Can I Pour Buttercream?

Baking By lordbuffington Updated 11 Feb 2010 , 4:16pm by lordbuffington

lordbuffington Posted 11 Feb 2010 , 2:09pm
post #1 of 6

OK, my boss asked me to make two cakes for a luncheon tomorrow. I have very little time to so them as it is (with working and all) but I want them to be perfect (of course). I want a smooth look but am not going to use fondant. A Wilton instructor once told me you can warm buttercream and pour it over cakes, however, I've never seen or even heard of it being done. Have any of you had experiences with this? I've already made two batches of buttercream, so if it can't be done, I'll just do what I can with what I've already made, but hopefully someone here can shed some light for me.

Thanks so much!

Andrea

5 replies
TexasSugar Posted 11 Feb 2010 , 2:42pm
post #2 of 6

I've never heard of this nor have I tried it. My thoughts though is if you are already working with limited time, it probably isn't a good time to try something new that may not even work out for ya.

windemire Posted 11 Feb 2010 , 2:45pm
post #3 of 6

Poured buttercream is another term for steam buttercream. Here's a link for a recent discussion on the topic. It includes a link to a site that has complete instructions and photos.

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-661572-steam.html+buttercream

HTH! thumbs_up.gif

mamawrobin Posted 11 Feb 2010 , 3:06pm
post #4 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasSugar

I've never heard of this nor have I tried it. My thoughts though is if you are already working with limited time, it probably isn't a good time to try something new that may not even work out for ya.




I'm with TexasSugar on trying something new since you have limited time. If you do try this I hope it works out for you. Be sure to post some pictures.

lissyUK Posted 11 Feb 2010 , 3:13pm
post #5 of 6

What about using a poured fondant? We can buy this by the box in powdered form in the UK. You just mix it up with some water and pour it over. Just keep it really thick when you make it up- if it's too runny it just goes everywhere! I think you have to seal the cake with warmed apricot glaze before you apply it.

lordbuffington Posted 11 Feb 2010 , 4:16pm
post #6 of 6

Thanks everyone...I was thinking that with my limited time I shouldn't try anything new but I thought I'd ask anyway. The "steam buttercream" sounds like something I could try, but - is "fresh cream" considered butter? My buttercream has butter, in which case I'd skip this altogether, but maybe I could make some extra cakes to practice with?

Thanks again for all the info!

Andrea

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