Stenciling - What Did I Do Wrong??

Decorating By The_Sugar_Fairy Updated 8 Dec 2009 , 6:02am by pippilotta

The_Sugar_Fairy Posted 6 Dec 2009 , 7:04pm
post #1 of 10

Hello all! I just tried stenciling on two cakes - one fondant and one buttercream. It did not work out as I had hoped. I used royal icing. The first time I did it, the icing was too thick and stuck to the stencil when I tried to pull it off. Then I thinned the royal icing a bit and tried again. It worked better but some of the icing still came up with the stencil. I tried to include a picture, but it didn't work. Please check out the cakes in my profile - they are the two fuschia coloured cakes together in the picture. Any tips or advice would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!

9 replies
leah_s Posted 6 Dec 2009 , 7:19pm
post #2 of 10

Looks pretty normal to me. The RI might be a little thick. You do need to clean up any points after you take the stencil off.

pippilotta Posted 7 Dec 2009 , 1:39pm
post #3 of 10

I made two stenciled cakes, both with thinned paste colour from sugarflair.
The paste was thinned with a little bit vodka and I stenciled with a wide, chopped paintbrush.
It worked perfect - take a look in my pics...

uberathlete Posted 7 Dec 2009 , 1:55pm
post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by pippilotta

I made two stenciled cakes, both with thinned paste colour from sugarflair.
The paste was thinned with a little bit vodka and I stenciled with a wide, chopped paintbrush.
It worked perfect - take a look in my pics...




pippilotta, you mean just paste color? So you didn't use an actual icing like royal icing or colorflow icing?

pippilotta Posted 7 Dec 2009 , 2:27pm
post #5 of 10

Yes, I used only thinned paste colour without icing.

obabassa Posted 7 Dec 2009 , 2:56pm
post #6 of 10

Are you using a spatula or a brush. I find the spatula will allow you to get thinner more even layer on. It looks like to me your applying the icing kind of thick. It only needs to be a thin layer of icing. I think when your icing is applied too thick when you lift the stencil it will catch and pull your icing up. Go a little thinner with the consistency of your icing (not tooooo thin or it will drip) and a little thinner application of icing. I would say a good consistency is like the consistency of elmers glue.
Also, I suggest practicing on something first. Apply it to the side of a cake pan or if you have a Wiltons practice board so you can get a feel for it before you put it on your cake.
Hope this helps.

uberathlete Posted 7 Dec 2009 , 3:45pm
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by pippilotta

Yes, I used only thinned paste colour without icing.




Oic. Just one more question. What's a "chopped" paintbrush?

ericaplh Posted 7 Dec 2009 , 6:26pm
post #8 of 10

if you mix royal icing with some piping gel, it will work great.

just_for_fun Posted 7 Dec 2009 , 6:46pm
post #9 of 10

I used a small offset spatula, and my RI was pretty thick. I made a smooth "wipe"which left only a thin layer of icing, and lifted the stencil. Then I used a damp finger to tamp down the spikes that formed when I lifted the stencil. (Mine was on cookies, see my pics)

pippilotta Posted 8 Dec 2009 , 6:02am
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Quote:

What's a "chopped" paintbrush?



That's a large, wide paintbrush, where I cut the long bristles...

Sorry for my english, explain in german is easier for me icon_confused.gif

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%