Dusting And Steaming Gumpaste

Decorating By crazydoglady Updated 18 Jun 2013 , 9:14pm by cairocats

crazydoglady Posted 27 Oct 2009 , 11:34pm
post #1 of 11

after i dust gumpaste flowers with chalk and or petal dust, i'd like the colors to set.
i've heard that steam will work. does steam also make it shiny?
also, do most decorators dust petals as they are added or after the flower is complete?

tia

10 replies
Texas_Rose Posted 27 Oct 2009 , 11:38pm
post #2 of 11

Steam will make them shine for a couple of days, or sometimes less. I dust them after the flower is complete because it's easier to tell where I want to add a bit of color.

Sweet_Guys Posted 28 Oct 2009 , 1:40am
post #3 of 11

OMG...The steamer works WONDERFULLY to enhance the way the flowers look...It gives them a very nice sheen...We found a really cheap steamer at one of the chain bedding stores.

Paul

bobwonderbuns Posted 28 Oct 2009 , 1:44am
post #4 of 11

If you look in my pix, I did a Fall calla lily cake. Those callas were dusted with lustre dust and steamed with a tea kettle. They stayed shiny for the duration. It's a wonderful way to set color -- and gives a lovely sheen too.

cas17 Posted 28 Oct 2009 , 2:05am
post #5 of 11

i just did this myself for the first time (dusting and steaming) and it does shine for a day but then it has the prettiest velvety sheen that looks gorgeous! you can peek at my cake with the deep purple roses. sorry my camera is not the best. the biggest plus is that it indeed sets the dust so as to not make a mess on your icing. i just boil a pan of water on my stove and held the roses over it for about 5 seconds twirling them to get the entire rose done. easy peasy!

Sugarflowers Posted 28 Oct 2009 , 3:54am
post #6 of 11

Steaming flowers and leaves is one of my favorite techniques. It sets the color, removes the dusty look, and blends colors beautifully. If you want the flowers or leaves to remain shiny then you will need to use Luster Dust.

I like to use a tea kettle to steam my stuff. I can see the steam easily. I've over done it with a pot of water. Others are much better with that than I.

I like to add color before attaching petals so that I don't get color where I don't want it and I break fewer flowers this way. icon_smile.gif If I am making small flowers or blossoms then I dust them after they are dry. I normally dust leaves after they are dry as well.

HTH

Michele

crazydoglady Posted 28 Oct 2009 , 1:17pm
post #7 of 11

sounds wonderful! thanks everyone.

Rylan Posted 28 Oct 2009 , 1:42pm
post #8 of 11

Good luck!

NYCGiGi Posted 28 Oct 2009 , 1:54pm
post #9 of 11

I really want to try this technique!

jlynnw Posted 28 Oct 2009 , 2:08pm
post #10 of 11

I got a steamer at the fabric store and love it. I also like to use the tea kettle if I am only doing a few things. My roses and callas where done this way. Make sure you do not touch the flowers when they have been steamed until they dry all the way. It will take the color off and your will never be able to get that spot to take the color for some reason.

cairocats Posted 18 Jun 2013 , 9:14pm
post #11 of 11

Another way is to put water in a saucepan, cover it with foil with a small hole in the center.  It works really well.

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