Covering Boards For Stacked Cakes??

Decorating By Yizzi Updated 8 Feb 2010 , 11:51pm by all4cake

Yizzi Posted 8 Oct 2009 , 12:06am
post #1 of 17

I'm not asking about the base board that the entire cake sits on -- I'm asking about the boards that are under the middle cakes (that you can't see). I have been buying the plastic type cake boards and cutting them to size -- however I just read that someone uses the cardboard circles and hot glues wax paper to it. When I buy the plastic type I have to cut it before I put my cake on it and of course it is jagged and a little off :/ So I find myself trying to cover the edges with icing. If I did a cardboard circle - I'm assuming I could use a box cutter/xacto knife and cut it directly to size after the crumb coat but before the final coat or fondant.

What do you do?

16 replies
cylstrial Posted 8 Oct 2009 , 2:46am
post #2 of 17

I like to just buy the cake boards smaller than the cake that I'm baking.

If I'm out of the right size, I'll cut the cake board down with an exacto knife. I put the cake on there once it has cooled and trace around it. Then I put the cake back on the cooling rack and cut the cake board down to size.

It works for me.

Yizzi Posted 8 Oct 2009 , 2:55am
post #3 of 17

But wouldn't the regular round cardboard circles soak up grease and get soggy?

dandelion56602 Posted 8 Oct 2009 , 2:59am
post #4 of 17

They won't get soggy, but if you're worried about it you can use the glad press'n seal

chasebrad Posted 8 Oct 2009 , 3:15am
post #5 of 17

I always use the press'n seal to cover my boards!

Also maybe you want to get a hot knife to help you cut the plastic boards. I use mine to cut my own cake boards from foam boards. That way you don't have jagged edges. You can find them very expensive to very reasonable. I just bought one at Michaels for less than $15 and it works great.....now I have smooth edges on my boards!

Texas_Rose Posted 8 Oct 2009 , 3:35am
post #6 of 17

I use the press and seal wrap too...it sticks to foam boards perfectly and doesn't tear when the cake is cut. I use a box cutter on my foamboards. They're always nice and smooth. I've looked at the hot knife before but I am rather accident prone so I decided to stick with what I'm used to.

Yizzi Posted 8 Oct 2009 , 4:23am
post #7 of 17

Yay!! This is the info I was looking for! Thank you all so much!! icon_smile.gif

__Jamie__ Posted 8 Oct 2009 , 4:31am
post #8 of 17

Foam core, and very soon thanks to JeffArnett (bless him, I wanna picnh his cheeks for this!), we'll have access to precut foam core!! Yay! I just got done cutting a bunch of rounds from the skinny stuff, piece of cake, but the 1/2 inch...ugh! Hot knife or not...ugh!

doodledo Posted 8 Oct 2009 , 2:40pm
post #9 of 17

I have seen when using foam core for the base they stack 3 together. How many for the middle layers?

__Jamie__ Posted 8 Oct 2009 , 3:00pm
post #10 of 17

I use the thinnest for tiers. For bases, I now use masonite, or standard English drums. Dang it's cheap (masonite or MDF) when you cut it yourself. I don't trust foam core for bases for heavy cakes.

tirby Posted 8 Feb 2010 , 10:14pm
post #11 of 17

Foam Core?? Where do you get it? and what thickness? Curious because I have a few cakes coming up and the bride wants buttercream. and the seemless look. NO boarder so???

_Jamie_ Posted 8 Feb 2010 , 10:17pm
post #12 of 17

It's the stuff at Michaels, Joann, places like that. Even Walmart. In the art section.

Texas_Rose Posted 8 Feb 2010 , 10:19pm
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by tirby

Foam Core?? Where do you get it? and what thickness? Curious because I have a few cakes coming up and the bride wants buttercream. and the seemless look. NO boarder so???




Foamcore comes from the craft store or walmart or the dollar tree. The thinner kind is 1/4" and it's pretty strong. If I were doing a tier bigger than 10" I might use two thicknesses of it.

It comes in sheets like a posterboard and at Walmart you'll find it with the school supplies.

all4cake Posted 8 Feb 2010 , 10:41pm
post #14 of 17

I use regular cake circles...sometimes, they're waxed...most times not. Depending on the overall size of the cake, I may double them and criss-cross the corrugations with just a smear of icing between them to stick them together.

tirby Posted 8 Feb 2010 , 10:47pm
post #15 of 17

thanks its good to know.I had no idea what foam core was?! SO which is cheeper? as a decorator I want strong reliable and cheep icon_smile.gif
REALLY at the $ store?? I know I have seen it at walmart before but NEVER realised it could be what everyone was talking about

tirby Posted 8 Feb 2010 , 11:34pm
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by all4cake

I use regular cake circles...sometimes, they're waxed...most times not. Depending on the overall size of the cake, I may double them and criss-cross the corrugations with just a smear of icing between them to stick them together.




where do you get them

all4cake Posted 8 Feb 2010 , 11:51pm
post #17 of 17

Whoever sells them...just regular ol' corrugated cake circles...Sometimes, Hobby Lobby, Michael's, Ben Franklin, order them online by the dozen and some by the case from places like fondant source . com and CKproducts and oasisupply.com and bakerycrafts.com...I did use foamcore on a couple of cakes but the cakes were set onto cardboard circles then attached to the foamcore with icing (I use foamcore when I make cakes with suspended edges...like a 12-8-10-6-8-4...).

I've found that the base is the key to a stable cake...as long as it is rigid/not flimsy, there's not going to be any give in the upper tiers either. JMESHO

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