jannp Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 5:38pm
post #1 of

am trying to find accurate cake serving charts. on wilton, it shows that an 11x15 cake will serve 54 people (can that really be?) and found another site that shows an 11x15 cake serving 35 people. any help will be greatly appreciated.

8 replies
CoutureCakeCreations Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 5:45pm
post #2 of

I do use the wilton chart and it has not failed me yet. I wouldnt mind another one though.

indydebi Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 5:54pm
post #3 of

I'm betting the 54 serving chart is for "party" servings on a 2-layer cake. I know the 35 servings is for the industry standard 2x2x2 on a single layer cake.

On a rectangle cake, it's easy to do the math to figure servings.

11x15, when cut in 2" by 2" pieces, means the cake will be cut in approx 5 rows (11 divided by 2 = approx 5 rows) by 7 columns (15" divided by 2" = approx 7 columns). 5x7=35 servings.

If you were going to cut them 2x3x2" for example, then the 11x15 would be cut in 5 rows by 5 columns = 25 servings.

prterrell Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 5:58pm
post #4 of

All of my cakes are 4" high and all my my servings are 1"x2"x4", so for me, an 11x15x4 cake would serve 82.

jannp Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 8:13pm
post #5 of

if you can get 2 different servings from a single cake, how do you price it out?

indydebi Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 8:36pm
post #6 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by jannp

if you can get 2 different servings from a single cake, how do you price it out?




You pick one chart and stick to it. Example: A 10" cake serves 38 per the wilton wedding chart, which is what I go by to determine pricing. I like to work in round numbers, so 35 x my per-serving-rate = cost of cake. I tell customer, "This cake serves 25-35, depending on how you cut it. The price is $xx.xx."

My 11x15, single layer, serves 35. I tell the customer, "This cake serves 25-35, depending on how you cut it. The price is $xx.xx."

*IF* you choose to have party pricing and wedding price (I, and a number of other CC'ers, strongly advise against it), then it just becomes semantics.

A 2-layer cake, industry standard piece for a wedding is 1x2x4 = 8 cubic inches. If you go by party serving, 1.5x2x4 = 12 cubic inches. The party serving is 50% more cake per serving, ergo the price should be 50% higher per serving.

6" square, cut in 1x2x4 = 18 servings (6 rows by 3 columns) x $3/serving = $54.
6" square, cut in 1.5x2x4 = 12 servings (4 rows by 3 columns) x $4.50/serving ($3 + 50% more) = $54

It's all the same price per cake. YOu're just letting the customer know the range of servings they can get. But you PRICE by the maximum number of servings the cake is DESIGNED to serve.

Some people would cut a 6" square into 4 pieces, but that has nothing to do with how you price it.

jannp Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 8:47pm
post #7 of

thank you so much - am starting out and trying to get a handle on servings and pricing.

indydebi Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 8:50pm
post #8 of

Here's a couple of charts to get you started:

Earline's tend to allocate larger pieces: http://www.earlenescakes.com/ckserchart.htm

Wilton's is the industry standard, 1x2x4: http://www.wilton.com/wedding/wedding-cakes/wedding-cake-data.cfm

prterrell Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 9:52pm
post #9 of

I price per cubic inch of cake, not by serving, but it really comes out to the same thing.

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