Can Smbc Be Used Under Fondant?? Seems Too Soft!

Decorating By Kellbella Updated 5 Oct 2015 , 1:50am by writezoe

Kellbella Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 5:24pm
post #1 of 32

I'm making a grooms cake for my brother's wedding tomorrow and am having second thoughts about useing SMBC under my choco-pan fondant like I had planned. The SMBC seems like it will be too soft and i can just picture the fondant sliding off...will it work...any advice? Please help..TIA

31 replies
-K8memphis Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 5:38pm
post #2 of 32

I use it all the time but I place my fondant on chilled cake so...

__Jamie__ Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 5:43pm
post #3 of 32

Ditto to K8.

miny Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 5:49pm
post #4 of 32

Just put your cake in the fridge for a couple hours before applying your fondand to harden it. It works great!

Godiva Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 5:52pm
post #5 of 32

Same here...that is all I use and never had a problem. Always wait until your cake is nicely chilled before you cover in fondant.

Kellbella Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 9:07pm
post #6 of 32

Thank you all sooo much...you've helped calm my nerves icon_cry.gif

Thanks again!

mom2abc Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 9:20pm
post #7 of 32

Hold the phone...I thought you were supposed to keep fondant away from cold cake/icing? I am really confused. Does it cause condensation? I have wondered about this for such a long time, I only just got stumped enough to ask. Sorry for the (apparently) dumb question.

__Jamie__ Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 9:27pm
post #8 of 32

Nope, a big fondant myth. Problems occur when people take their fondant covered cakes out of the fridge, condensation begins to form and they panic. They start to wipe at it, or mop it up. Leaaaaaave it alone. Hands off! Put it by a fan. Let it sit for a bit. The condensation evaporates in no time, and your cake is fine. Now, that said, if you have large fondant details that are heavy, or figurines with pieces that can droop or sag, by all means, put these on the cake before delivery, NOT before they go in the fridge. Regular details like stripes, beads, balls, anything that lays flat....are fine.

I can't think of any fondant covered cakes that I have NOT stored in fridge at some point.

mom2abc Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 9:31pm
post #9 of 32

What a relief! This opens me up so much. I have been afraid to even try it! I have so many other recipes and flavors and combinations to try now! Thanks so much, Jamie!!!!

miny Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 9:32pm
post #10 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by mom2abc

Hold the phone...I thought you were supposed to keep fondant away from cold cake/icing? I am really confused. Does it cause condensation? I have wondered about this for such a long time, I only just got stumped enough to ask. Sorry for the (apparently) dumb question.


Its a valid question, yes, you can refridgerate fondant as long as it's NOT Wilton but don't touch it while it comes to room temperature because it will sweat but the condensation won't be a problem with the flavor

__Jamie__ Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 9:34pm
post #11 of 32

Lol, now there's a brand of fondant that wouldn't ever have a chance in hell of coming near my fridge. Dang though, it sure is great to work with, for my dumb-dumb-dummy cakes! icon_biggrin.gif

mom2abc Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 9:36pm
post #12 of 32

I'm so glad no one can see me do my happy dance! I love this website!!!

doodledo Posted 12 Sep 2009 , 1:23am
post #13 of 32

Can I ask how does the SMBC cut after it has been chilled? Does it go back to being creamy?

__Jamie__ Posted 12 Sep 2009 , 1:28am
post #14 of 32

Yep! It returns to it's wonderful soft consistency.

AKA_cupcakeshoppe Posted 12 Sep 2009 , 4:32am
post #15 of 32

_Jaime_ I just wanted to ask, cause I've done SMBC under fondant before but the moment I put the fondant over it and smooth it with my hands first, the fondant gets sticky and the SMBC gets so soft like in less than 5 minutes. Do you work in an AC room? Thanks!

__Jamie__ Posted 12 Sep 2009 , 4:55am
post #16 of 32

Really?? That fast? Hmmmmm. Where are you and is it humid? I would bet the farm that it must be humid. And yes...a/c for sure. Where I am it is 100+ now, with some days humid, some days dry. And I always put it on over a very chilled cake. That always helps.

AKA_cupcakeshoppe Posted 12 Sep 2009 , 6:12am
post #17 of 32

yeah it's very humid here. it never gets lower than 80% humidity I think. I live a stone's throw away from the equator and in an island so lots of water. How long do you chill it? and do you use premade fondant?

sorry to hijack the thread OP.

__Jamie__ Posted 12 Sep 2009 , 6:18am
post #18 of 32

Ah, that's it then. I guess your drinking glasses sweat all over everything too, right? I chill them for at least an hour...longer usually. So they are very firm when I got to work on them.

I make Michelle Foster Fondant...MFF. If you look it up, and there is still more than one recipe from her, use the one with the most 2 tbsp measurements.

AKA_cupcakeshoppe Posted 12 Sep 2009 , 8:21am
post #19 of 32

I use MFF too. yeah everything and everyone sweats LOL so better use the AC room then. Thanks _Jaime_!

carmycakes Posted 16 Sep 2009 , 12:59am
post #20 of 32

Hi
What's wrong with the Wilton Fondant? I see a lot of negative posts. I never used before and just bought it. I am afraid to use it.

Thank you

__Jamie__ Posted 16 Sep 2009 , 1:28am
post #21 of 32

Lol....don't eat it! Nastiest stuff on earth. On the flip side though, the BEST fondant to work with, in my opinion. Handles beautifully. But you just can't eat it. Seriously, grossest stuff on earth. It's the reason fondant has such a bad reputation.

KitchenKat Posted 16 Sep 2009 , 1:58am
post #22 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by AKA_cupcakeshoppe

yeah it's very humid here. it never gets lower than 80% humidity I think. I live a stone's throw away from the equator and in an island so lots of water. How long do you chill it? and do you use premade fondant?

sorry to hijack the thread OP.




Hey cupcakeshoppe I'm probably near the same latitude as you, only we're smack dab in the equator. Same humidty and temp. When working with IMBC or SMBC under fondant I always chill my cakes. I let the torted and filled cakes settle at room temp for at least 12 hours then spackle them with cake crumbs and frosting and pop them in the fridge for a couple of hours or overnight. Then I frost with IMBC - thinly, just enough to make it smooth. Usually the residual coolness of the cake is enough to set the IMBC but if not, it goes back in the fridge for another hour or 2. Then I cover with fondant.

I always work in an air conditioned room but if that's not possible, a fan blowing towards your workspace should also work, if you don't mind the sugar & cornstarch dust flying around.

riagirl Posted 8 Jul 2011 , 6:24pm
post #23 of 32

ressurecting this thread. i tried smbc under fondant a couple of weeks ago and it was a disaster. covered the cake in SMBC and let it chill for a couple of hours - it was hard as butter when I was ready to cover in fondant. i didn'd plac eit back in the freezer, just let it rest on my countertop. after a couple of hours, as the SMBC came back to room temp under the fondant, i got a lot of bubbles and cracks on the fondant....it was very very soft, i couldn't even put any decorations without cracking the fondant. i live in DC so it is very humid. although i did have the AC blasting. what did i do wrong? i loved the taste of smbc under fondant so i'd like to be able to learn this icon_smile.gif thanks!!

AnotherCaker Posted 8 Jul 2011 , 6:27pm
post #24 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by riagirl

ressurecting this thread. i tried smbc under fondant a couple of weeks ago and it was a disaster. covered the cake in SMBC and let it chill for a couple of hours - it was hard as butter when I was ready to cover in fondant. i didn'd plac eit back in the freezer, just let it rest on my countertop. after a couple of hours, as the SMBC came back to room temp under the fondant, i got a lot of bubbles and cracks on the fondant....it was very very soft, i couldn't even put any decorations without cracking the fondant. i live in DC so it is very humid. although i did have the AC blasting. what did i do wrong? i loved the taste of smbc under fondant so i'd like to be able to learn this icon_smile.gif thanks!!




You let it sit out before you started decorating it? Part of the problem right there. Once you cover in fondant, start decorating it. When I have a lot of decorating to do, I'll put it back in fridge to firm back up, and pick back up decorating. Sorry to hear you had a disaster, but give it another shot.

SaraClassic Posted 25 Sep 2014 , 1:47pm
post #25 of 32

AOk so in reference to the last few posts.. When Can it come to room temp? Never? Once chilled with smbc and fondant it must stay chilledto decorate and deliver too? I've done everything but keep it chilled all the way to deliver and is hate a wedding cake to soften up an hour after delivery yikes!

AZCouture Posted 25 Sep 2014 , 8:15pm
post #26 of 32

AI remove them from the fridge in time with when I want them to come back to serving temp, or deliver them early enough so theu come to temp where they are sitting in place for the party.

Small two tier, I give it a couple hours, three tier, three, etc., etc.

lanawith Posted 27 Sep 2014 , 10:41am
post #27 of 32

AIf it's 100% butter smbc it will be just fine. I use it all the time with no problems. When chilled it's rock hard and solid for a perfect fondant application.

ashwee7 Posted 1 Oct 2014 , 4:48pm
post #28 of 32

For those of you who use SMBC under fondant and keep it chilled, do you ever have issues with air bubbles, sagging fondant or blow outs when it comes to room temp at a venue or when it has been delivered to a client?

writezoe Posted 3 Oct 2015 , 1:36pm
post #29 of 32

I just used SMBC made with 50/50 butter and high ratio shortening on my 1st 4 tier wedding cake.  I'll never do that again.  Baked and froze the cakes in advance,  thawed, torted, filled and lightly iced, sat in fridge overnight.   Brought cakes back to room temp, then chilled each one just enough to harden SMBC for fondant application. Used Satin Ice.

Cakes were fine, set in a cupboard overnight to set fondant and next day buldges, cracks and blowouts.  Luckily, my design has the cakes totally covered in flowers and ruffles and they look great today (bottom 2 tiers are stacked and top 2 tiers are stacked for transportation - will finish stacking them on site). But I'm afraid the blowouts will compromise the structure when it's all put together and the cake will sag or fall at the reception.  I used 1/2" dowels on the 12 and 10" tiers, 6 and 4 respective,  and 4 Bobo tea straws in the 8".  6" top tier will be secured with a center dowel through the middle of all 4 tiers.

Oh, did I mention it's an outdoor wedding, 50 degrees Fahrenheit, windy and raining?   I think this might be my first and last wedding cake.  LOL. I'll try to post pictures tomorrow (usually have trouble with that but I'll try).

Brookebakescake Posted 3 Oct 2015 , 2:07pm
post #30 of 32

Ashwe7, no, I don't have a problem with that. I keep my cakes in the fridge, unstacked, until time to deliver. No problem with sagging or bulging, because the smbc firms up in fridge. When it comes to room temp, the fondant has set and no sagging or bubbles happen. 

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%