Drying Time Question

Baking By cookiescookies Updated 11 Sep 2009 , 4:21am by emlashlee

cookiescookies Posted 7 Sep 2009 , 5:06am
post #1 of 11

I know this has probably been discussed several times before, but for some reason I can never find threads in the forums using the search function.

How long do you generally let cookies dry between flooding the base and adding additional colours? I read an article on cakecentral that said you should wait at least 18 hours...i've never let mine dry that long before writing and decorating, but I'm pretty new to this. I'm planning a couple of cookie projects and want to ensure the colours don't bleed.

Thanks! (and sorry for the repeat)

10 replies
Elise87 Posted 7 Sep 2009 , 10:25am
post #2 of 11

18 hours is for like the whole cookie to dry when it's finished before you can package etc. When i flood a cookie and want to flood more on top of that i usually wait maybe 1 to 2 hours to make sure it has a nice firm well crusted surface so the piping on top of it won't bleed into it, but that time may vary from person to person or the temp that your working in

HTH

antonia74 Posted 7 Sep 2009 , 3:31pm
post #3 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by cookiescookies

I read an article on cakecentral that said you should wait at least 18 hours...i've never let mine dry that long before writing and decorating, but I'm pretty new to this.




I think you mean the one I wrote? I had to write an article that would cover logistics for every size of cookie someone might be icing and all the different temperatures/humidities of regions out there in cyberspace.

I know 2"-4" cookies would be well dry within 18 hours, but if someone was making 6"-10" sized cookies they may well take that long to dry. It was just as a precaution that I said 18 hours, to be sure. (I've actually had people email me griping about the article advising their cookies would be dry in 18 hours and they weren't.....then I find out they are in extremely humid climates or making giant 14" sized cookies. Come on! icon_rolleyes.gif)

Just make some extra cookies in your order. When your base coat is hard to the touch (depending on the size of cookie you happen to be doing, say about 8-10 hours, you can then add the details you want.

Bleeding also occurs when two different consistencies of icing are applied. For example, using regular white icing and then a thinner red icing. The red is thinner and able to "bleed" into the other colour. I find if you make one single batch of icing, thin it and then only tint your colours from that without using more water....the colours won't run/bleed.

Even better, and to save yourself a lot of time, try adding your details onto the wet background icing right away. If the colours are the same consistency the details sink into the background for a cool pro effect, there should be no bleeding AND you don't have to wait for the white to dry first. If you want to experiment with this technique, start with simple things like polka dots and stripes on cookies. SUCH a time-saver!

luv2bake6 Posted 8 Sep 2009 , 6:08pm
post #4 of 11

When i make cookies, i bake and flood the cookies with glace or RI(depending on the amount, i may ice the next day). the cookie sit out overnight to dry. By the next day, i'm able to decorate them. I allow them to dry a few hours and am then ready to package.

kneadacookie Posted 9 Sep 2009 , 1:22am
post #5 of 11

wow i outline and then flood. usually after maybe an hour i can start adding detail work. i can't imagine working on cookies for several days.

luv2bake6 Posted 9 Sep 2009 , 4:07am
post #6 of 11

some decos can be done after a bit of drying time but i cannot stencil after that short of time or write with markers, or stamp, etc etc. They need to dry overnight

emlashlee Posted 10 Sep 2009 , 2:38am
post #7 of 11

Okay, I'm a newbie here and am SO glad I read this thread. Am I right that in the drying time (overnight) that you just are supposed to leave the cookies uncovered? I'm just worried about them drying out the cookie. Does the icing keep it from doing that?

antonia74 Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 12:21am
post #8 of 11

Yes, uncovered. Good air circulation dries the icing quickly.

No worry about the cookies getting "stale" or "dried out" within a day or two. You're not icing a soft. chewy cookie anyway. These are firmer, crisper cookies usually.

luv2bake6 Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 12:41am
post #9 of 11

I have a small pizza rack that holds my cookie sheets. When i leave them out to dry, i just put a plastic tablecloth (those disposable ones) over the top so it drapes down loosely. I do this to ensure nothing drops or gets stuck on the cookies while drying. The cookies will stay fresh, don't worry about it. Like antonia said, it's a firm cookie to begin with so it can stand overnight and still be great.

indydebi Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 1:34am
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by antonia74

Even better, and to save yourself a lot of time, try adding your details onto the wet background icing right away. If the colours are the same consistency the details sink into the background for a cool pro effect, ......



This IS a cool effect! Here is a photo of some cookies I just threw together one day (so overlook the smudged ghost eyebrow!): http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1279485

The purple cookie has this effect that antonia is talking about. You can also see it on the Christmas Tree ..... the white 'garland' was added when the green was still wet an it blended in, while the orange garland was added after the green/white had set.

LUV the purple cookie effect, though!! thumbs_up.gif

emlashlee Posted 11 Sep 2009 , 4:21am
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by antonia74

Yes, uncovered. Good air circulation dries the icing quickly.

No worry about the cookies getting "stale" or "dried out" within a day or two. You're not icing a soft. chewy cookie anyway. These are firmer, crisper cookies usually.




Thanks, antonia74 and luv2bake6! I appreciate the help! icon_smile.gif

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