How Tall Are Your Cake Tiers?

Decorating By buggus Updated 9 Apr 2014 , 3:51am by AZCouture

buggus Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 12:08am
post #1 of 27

I'm making my first wedding cake next week and I'm wondering what the average height of tiers are? Alot of the ones I'm seeing look to be about 5-6 inches tall?? What is the average? What height do you make them? I always think the thicker tier looks more impressive kwim?

26 replies
Tika35 Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 12:19am
post #2 of 27

I always use 2" pans and have 2 layers per tier, so even after leveling my cakes and adding my filler they are about 4" high. This has always worked for my tiered cakes, but I'm also doing my first wedding cake in a few weeks and I'm using the same methods since it's worked with all of my other tiered cakes.

-K8memphis Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 12:42am
post #3 of 27

I think three and a half to five inches tall is the norm. I think when you get into a six inch tall slice of cake it doesn't fit the dessert plate as well.

rharris524 Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 12:46am
post #4 of 27

I'd say 4 or a little taller...I think that under 4 looks 'wimpy' for lack of a better word on a wedding cake

cakelady31 Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 12:52am
post #5 of 27

Mine end up between 4-5 inches tall. icon_smile.gif

ayerim979 Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 12:59am
post #6 of 27

I always use my 3 " pans (2 for each layer),so Im going to say they ae usually about 6 inches after leveling and filling. I also believe it depends on the cake design as far as height , some cake designs look nicer tall . IMO

leah_s Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 1:04am
post #7 of 27

4" is pretty standard. And like the previous poster said, often those taller tier slices don't fit on the dessert plate. If you're providing something 6" tall, be sure that the bride knows to order dinner plates for dessert plates.

tonedna Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 1:06am
post #8 of 27

4 inches standard for me too.
Edna icon_smile.gif

indydebi Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 1:09am
post #9 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonedna

4 inches standard for me too.
Edna icon_smile.gif


same here

FlourPots Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 1:11am
post #10 of 27

I always use 2" pans too, but I like the height of three layers.

buggus Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 1:30am
post #11 of 27

double post!

buggus Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 1:30am
post #12 of 27

hmm, a real mixed bag of answers! I guess it all depends on your preference, but good to hear 4" is the norm. I was thinking to use to 2" in pans and stack them. I figured with filling, etc, they'll be a bit higher anyway. I'll have to give it a shot. Thanks guys!

Kiddiekakes Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 1:32am
post #13 of 27

Mine end up being about 5 inches once the filling and icing is on.

indydebi Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 1:45am
post #14 of 27

Industry standard is 4" tall (1x2x4), so anything in the +/- range.....

BeeBoos-8599_ Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 1:53am
post #15 of 27

This is a good spot for my question then. I have only done a few tiered cakes and most of them have used my Wilton stand that has a center collumn a plates that each tier sits on so they do not normally stack on each other.

The few stacked cakes I have made tend to look heavy or frumpy for a better term. I did a 3 tier last winter (yeah the only picture I cannot for the life of me get to load) and it was a 12" 9" 6" and it just looked squatty and heavy. I use 2" pans and each tier has 2 layers. It was a fondant covered cake if that matters.

When I look at the pictures of say wedding cakes on CC and they look tall, gracefull and light (at least those done by the more experienced do). Do you think it is a matter of to thick of crumcoat or fondant rolled to thick? What else could cause this? Just wanted an opinion.

rharris524 Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 2:30am
post #16 of 27

I think that taller tiers would help the squatness also, making sure your tiers have a 4 inch difference helps...i.e. 14" 10" 6"

jamiekwebb Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 2:40am
post #17 of 27

Make sure that you support right too. If not it can cause the cake to smoosh some and become squat.

Cathy26 Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 9:09am
post #18 of 27

my birthday and christening cakes are probably just about 3 inches but my wedding cakes are 2 sponges leveled to 2 inches to get a 4 inch tier but next time im going for a 5 inch. the taller the better IMO

MikeRowesHunny Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 9:51am
post #19 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeeBoos-8599_

This is a good spot for my question then. I have only done a few tiered cakes and most of them have used my Wilton stand that has a center collumn a plates that each tier sits on so they do not normally stack on each other.

The few stacked cakes I have made tend to look heavy or frumpy for a better term. I did a 3 tier last winter (yeah the only picture I cannot for the life of me get to load) and it was a 12" 9" 6" and it just looked squatty and heavy. I use 2" pans and each tier has 2 layers. It was a fondant covered cake if that matters.

When I look at the pictures of say wedding cakes on CC and they look tall, gracefull and light (at least those done by the more experienced do). Do you think it is a matter of to thick of crumcoat or fondant rolled to thick? What else could cause this? Just wanted an opinion.




I am delivering a cake this afternoon that is the same size as the one you mentioned. All my layers were levelled to 2in and there are 2 cakes per tier, that plus filling and fondant and the cake board must make them at least 4.5-5in tall. It definitely doesn't look squatty. I will post a pic after delivery so you can see.

xxx

-K8memphis Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 9:51am
post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeeBoos-8599_

...The few stacked cakes I have made tend to look heavy or frumpy for a better term. I did a 3 tier last winter (yeah the only picture I cannot for the life of me get to load) and it was a 12" 9" 6" and it just looked squatty and heavy. I use 2" pans and each tier has 2 layers. It was a fondant covered cake if that matters.




I'm glad you said this. It helps me illustrate the fine point I was considering making.

See it's the same thing like my kid's age, when she was born she was less than 1/28th my age. Now she's over half my age~~She's 29 and I'm 58.

In other words it's all in the perspective.

A 14 inch cake that's 4 inches tall looks shorter than a 6 inch cake that's 4 inches tall. It's just the perspective.

So if you want that graceful look, you not only graduate the circumference of your tiers you graduate the heighths.

Which is why I suggested a range of heighths.

-K8memphis Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 9:56am
post #21 of 27

And you don't have to use more cake to get this look either. Range of height can be manipulated with the foamcore boards and additional cardboard circles cut the same size as the cakes tiers.

Because otherwise the bummer is you gotta use more cake on the biggest cake--but just build it up with some foamcore

Construction zone thoughts for you.

MikeRowesHunny Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 11:17am
post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by K8memphis-

And you don't have to use more cake to get this look either. Range of height can be manipulated with the foamcore boards and additional cardboard circles cut the same size as the cakes tiers.

Because otherwise the bummer is you gotta use more cake on the biggest cake--but just build it up with some foamcore

Construction zone thoughts for you.




thumbs_up.gif I have used 2 drums under the bottom tier before to balance it out with the top tier, which ALWAYS look taller, even when they are the same height. K8 has given you a great tip!

BeeBoos-8599_ Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 9:03pm
post #23 of 27

K8, That makes perfect sense. So, using the size cake I spoke about what would you have done to improve its look?

I also think that rolling my fondant to thick and or to thick of crumb coat makes them look wider but maybe that is just my perception. I really need to figure out how to get that cake posted (the picture was taken by the photographer I spoke about in my "I need advise" thread. It was for her daughter). It is a huge file since it was taken by a pro camera. I have resized it so many times and no luck. I will try again when I get a few minutes. Thanks for the input.

-K8memphis Posted 5 Sep 2009 , 9:48pm
post #24 of 27

I woulda shaved some of the height off the middle tier and shaved the most height off the top tier--then I'd assemble the layers and i'd ultimately have shorter tiers than the bottom tier.

I do try & bake the bottom tier real high though.

I mean Margaret Braun bakes off two inch cakes four inches tall kid you not~~not to mention 4-inch cakes that are 4 inches tall. So everything is right, nothing is wrong and however you do it is way cool.

icon_biggrin.gif

BeeBoos-8599_ Posted 6 Sep 2009 , 5:21am
post #25 of 27

FINALLY! Here is the cake I am talking about. I actually think the sizes were larger than I posted earlier. It was months ago and frankly, I am not sure. lol
LL

linnod Posted 9 Apr 2014 , 3:12am
post #26 of 27

How many cake layers do you use? I have heard of some baking 2 , 2" cakes and I have also seen 3 baked cakes with filling. 

 

Thank you

Linda

AZCouture Posted 9 Apr 2014 , 3:51am
post #27 of 27

Quote:

Originally Posted by linnod 
 

How many cake layers do you use? I have heard of some baking 2 , 2" cakes and I have also seen 3 baked cakes with filling. 

 

Thank you

Linda

Several ways, and the two you just mentioned are some. I bake in two 2" pans, and I collar the 8" pans and above. Once they're filled, iced, and covered with fondant (or not fondant covered), they come out to about 5" tall, maybe a hair over.

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