Modeling Chocolate

Sugar Work By lauriekailee Updated 23 Aug 2010 , 8:33pm by musician911

lauriekailee Posted 27 Aug 2009 , 5:28am
post #1 of 7

I am having trouble making people out of modeling chocolate. I bought a large oval tub of it-label is all in french. I tried to make a person and it got warm too fast. Does it need internal support? Can someone tell me what book I can read to help me or a site or am I doing something wrong?

HELP!!! javascript:emoticon('icon_cry.gif')

Laurie

6 replies
madgeowens Posted 27 Aug 2009 , 5:34am
post #2 of 7

I didn't know you could buy it, I thought you had to make it, thats news to me...
......I would use fondant myself.....

icer101 Posted 27 Aug 2009 , 5:38am
post #3 of 7

i alway use fondant/g/p to make people, animals, etc. sometimes pastillage to make people.. never , have use modeling chocolater for any of this. i love to make flowers from modeling chocolate,etc. hope you find your answer..

TooMuchCake Posted 27 Aug 2009 , 4:50pm
post #4 of 7

If you really want to use modeling chocolate, I'd suggest mixing it no less than half and half with fondant to help give it stability and make it less temperature sensitive. I use a LOT of modeling chocolate and wouldn't use anything other than Michele Foster's (Sugarflowers) chocolate leather recipe. But your best bet for figure modeling is either fondant or gumpaste.

HTH,
Deanna

lauriekailee Posted 28 Aug 2009 , 9:04pm
post #5 of 7

I know you can make people out of fondant and gp, but did any of you see the Cake Boss episode where they made the male "dancers" that were almost naked? They made them out of modeling chocolate and they had wonderful definition on the chest and abs. That is what I am trying to do.

CrankyCakes Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 10:19pm
post #6 of 7

I do wiring for the body, it just helps it keep its shape better though you don't really have to. Keeping a fan blowing on your work station helps me... hands are too hot. Good Luck!

musician911 Posted 23 Aug 2010 , 8:33pm
post #7 of 7

You don't need an internal structure (armature) for support. The chocolate has to be somewhat thicker depending on the particular piece you are trying to sculpt.

People can be tricky, caricatures often times help reduce the stress of trying to get to detailed.

If you want a person or piece to be in a particular position using an armature is best and easier. You first get the general shape of the peice using a wire frame. When creating this think of it as a skeleton think of where the joints would be and try to keep the piece close to the final position.

Next build up the structure with cereal treat (rice krispy treats) use this to help determine where the muscles would be. I recommend if detail is important in the hands, not going beyond the elbow area with the cereal treat. This allows for the arm / leg to taper and you to develop the hands without the forearm being really bulky.

When your piece is has its general form, cover and build any area that would be exposed flesh tone ( hands, calf, forearm, foot, neckline) Once that is created and set, add clothing. The method for doing this depends on the detail you are trying to achieve. This is something you'll have to play with to find what works for you. I hate making shoes.

Heads can be a challenge. Watch some videos on sculpting faces to learn some techniques. Applying them to chocolate rather than clay is tricky, but through practice, you'll get it.

Hope that helps. Sorry I got long winded. lol

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