Pricing Gourmet Cakes?

Decorating By kakedreamer1212 Updated 23 Aug 2009 , 3:21am by indydebi

kakedreamer1212 Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 6:39pm
post #1 of 10

Do you charge more money for a gourmet flavored cake than you do for your basic chocolate, white, yellow or stw. cake flavors and how much more? I got some great flavor ideas from the Gourmet cakes thread but am wondering how much more to charge for them.

9 replies
Texas_Rose Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 6:57pm
post #2 of 10

Some of them do end up costing more to make. They also have some really different textures so you may want to try them out before you offer them to customers.

gramofgwen Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 7:30pm
post #3 of 10

My standard cakes (boxed mix plus pudding, some kind of extract, extra egg) are all the same price. If I do a cake that calls for ingredients beyond those listed above, then I charge more. For instance, a hummingbird cake would require the addition of chopped nuts, pineapple, coconut, etc. so it would cost more. I use the old formula of ingredients times three to get my price, so all those extras would make the cake have a higher price.

__Jamie__ Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 7:39pm
post #4 of 10

I don't offer anything that is standard. Everything is premium and everything is scratch. And yes, I am considerably costlier than what would be considered average in my area.

prterrell Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 7:57pm
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by __Jamie__

I don't offer anything that is standard. Everything is premium and everything is scratch. And yes, I am considerably costlier than what would be considered average in my area.




Ditto.

kakedreamer1212 Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 7:59pm
post #6 of 10

I tried out Macsmom's Orange creamsicle cake a few days and it was AWESOME and let a few of my friends and family try it. They went crazy for it. It definately has way more ingredients in it than I'm use to putting in my usual cakes like choc. which I sometimes will add choc. pastry cream between the layers or strawberry that I may put a stw. pastry cream filling in and then just cover in basic buttercream ( I dont really consider these to be gourmet) and I do use a box mix. The Orange creamsicle cake was worth every penny in it but definately cost ME more than usual. What do you tell your customers when then ask why a cake like this cost more than say... a choc. cake with a choc. pastry cream filling?

KitchenKat Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 2:25am
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by prterrell

Quote:
Originally Posted by __Jamie__

I don't offer anything that is standard. Everything is premium and everything is scratch. And yes, I am considerably costlier than what would be considered average in my area.



Ditto.




Double ditto.

indydebi Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 2:44am
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakedreamer1212

What do you tell your customers when then ask why a cake like this cost more than say... a choc. cake with a choc. pastry cream filling?



You tell them that it costs more to make. Period. You don't have to hand over your recipe nor do you have to explain the process. If they press with "But what makes it more expensive?", a simple 'Oh you'd be surprised what it takes to create a masterpiece like this!" and then drop it.

matthewkyrankelly Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 3:03am
post #9 of 10

Richard Feynmen said of his work," If I could explain it to the average person, I wouldn't have been worth the Nobel Prize."

That's why its called gourmet. If it was easier, it would be called vanilla.

indydebi Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 3:21am
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by matthewkyrankelly

If it was easier, it would be called vanilla.


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