She Wants To Save The Cake For Five Days Before Serving It!!

Decorating By lomfise Updated 23 Aug 2009 , 9:03pm by Cathy26

lomfise Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 12:00pm
post #1 of 30

A group of collegues ordered a cake from me for another collegue's birthday. They gave it to her today and she loved it. The problem is, that she want's to save it for Tuesday when she'll be having a retirement reception.

I told her it would not taste as good in five days and the jam inside would make the cake soggy, even if she keeps it in the fridge, but she said that as long as there will be no health issues about it, she insists.

Now, what do you think I should tell her? I don't want people to eat this cake on Tuesday and think my cakes taste old and dry, which I'm pretty sure this cake will. icon_cry.gif
It's chocolate cake with vanilla buttercream and raspberry jam, covered in fondant.

29 replies
chefbarbie0513 Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 12:29pm
post #2 of 30

I'm not sure what to tell you! But, good luck

-K8memphis Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 12:31pm
post #3 of 30

I think it will be fine--make sure it is sealed well in a box that is then well covered in plastic wrap--I'd do two layers of plastic.

woodruffbn Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 12:34pm
post #4 of 30

Are you going to refridgerate? Sounds like you have a perishable filling. Maybe that could be your opt out. icon_smile.gif

brincess_b Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 12:35pm
post #5 of 30

my cake would be fine after 5 days, although as you say, a little bit soggier round the jam. perfectly tasty, but not quite the same. certainly not dry. especially if you make sure she knows it needs to be fully covered.
i think you just need to let it go, its her cake, and unless you are volunteering to make a fresher, free one, i dont think you will convince her (and you should not do that!).
xx

-K8memphis Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 12:36pm
post #6 of 30

I mean it might be showing a little wear but it's her cake.
I'm sure she'd be forthcoming with the facts if they were necessary.
I mean people could tell if it's in a 'used' condition so the hold time will be duly noted and discovered to be by her insistance.

But it will be very edible and might be a little squishy but...she's obviously ok with that possibility.

No worries.

lomfise Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 4:27pm
post #7 of 30

Thank you all. I guess I was just a little bit peeved that she didn't want to eat the cake. I know it's decorated and all, but cake is supposed to be eaten.

I will now take a step back and no longer worry, it is, as you said, her cake now.

LaBellaFlor Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 4:37pm
post #8 of 30

I make everything from scratch and it would not be fine 5 days later. I personally would tell her that it could spoil. I wouldn't want anyone to think thats what my cake taste like.

cylstrial Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 4:48pm
post #9 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaBellaFlor

I make everything from scratch and it would not be fine 5 days later. I personally would tell her that it could spoil. I wouldn't want anyone to think thats what my cake taste like.




I think that's a good idea! I wouldn't want someone to keep my cake for an extra 5 days either. Because I've already been working on it 1 or 2 days.

Good luck!

LaBellaFlor Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 4:51pm
post #10 of 30

Exactly! I average 3 days to make a cake as well, then delivery. That ends up being 9 days tell its served. Thats a long time.

mommyle Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 4:58pm
post #11 of 30

I can't imagine having a cake in my house and not eating it!!! that thing would be GONE!!! It's like Martha Stewart giving tips on using left-over wine! What???? Left-over wine??? Who are you kidding????

-K8memphis Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 5:00pm
post #12 of 30

Yes this would be where those nasty earth destroying, polar bear killing,
arctic circle melting chemicals come in handy. <lightening flashes menacingly>
< thunder rattles the rafters > <raaahhhhhr>
Nothing says 'holding the cake for five days' like c.a.k.e. m.i.x)

icon_biggrin.gif

JGMB Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 7:55pm
post #13 of 30

This reminds me of the time I made a pecan pie as a thank-you for a guy who had done some work around the church. He said, "Oh, this is great! I'll take it on my hunting trip next week." Eeeeewwww!!!!!

__Jamie__ Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 8:07pm
post #14 of 30

I wouldn't want a cake that could last that long. Chemicals, preservatives, whatever. No thanks. I like to think my cakes are delicate dainty babies that must be cared for and consumed in a timely manner. icon_biggrin.gif

Win Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 8:12pm
post #15 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by JGMB

This reminds me of the time I made a pecan pie as a thank-you for a guy who had done some work around the church. He said, "Oh, this is great! I'll take it on my hunting trip next week." Eeeeewwww!!!!!




Again, if he were to freeze his pie (well-wrapped) it would fine. No different than frozen pies in the grocery... (except I'm sure yours tastes better.)

lomfise: If the lady who wants to wait to serve her cake were to freeze it, it would be fine as well. She just needs to take it out the day of the event and let it thaw in its box. I ran across an article written by a pastry chef whose friend insisted that she make her wedding cake -even though she'd (the chef) had previously scheduled an out-of-town seminar for the week of the wedding. Her friend was not to be persuaded to use a different baker. So, long story short, the writer of the article made her friend's cake. She boxed it well, froze it, and left instructions for it to be thawed and delivered the day of the wedding. It turned out beautifully and all the guests raved. The bride was happy and the chef was pleased with the results of the experiment.

edited for typos... sorry, long day, I'm sure there's more than the one.

megmarie Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 8:17pm
post #16 of 30

I guess your only option left is to distract her("hey look a birdie!"), grab the cake, and run? icon_biggrin.gif

JanH Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 8:23pm
post #17 of 30

Most food comes with a "best used by" or "expiration date."

However, if the purchaser/recipient wishes to keep the product past that date to be eaten later - there's nothing the seller can do to prevent this.

If the purchaser/recipient chooses to feed "out of date/code" cake to her guests, it's her party. And any negative feedback falls on the hostess not on the baker. (After all, you did deliver a freshly baked, custom decorated cake on the date ordered.....)

HTH

emrldsky Posted 21 Aug 2009 , 8:24pm
post #18 of 30

So your colleagues ordered this cake for her for a celebration and they don't get any of it? I'd be totally PEEVED if I were them. :/

lomfise Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 5:32am
post #19 of 30

The cake is at this moment sitting well wrapped in the fridge at the office, and I don't feel like using my saturday going there to freeze it, so I'll just hope for the best come tuesday.

We don't get very good cake mixes where I live, so everything is from scratch and with as few chemicals as possible. I'll just get another collegue (who's on my side and peeved not to get any cake) to spread the rumour that it's been saved for five days.

Thanks again for all the advice and comments, I really needed some laughs.

By the way, if you want to see it, it's the golf cake in my photos.

-K8memphis Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 3:49pm
post #20 of 30

That cake is adorable I can see why she wants to save it. I mean a semi-sane person might want to take a picture and show her other group of party people but...this way you get the added drama of_____ ___ ____ fill in the blank anything can happen huh.

Try to develop an I don't give a flip mindset in the meantime.

Being a bookseller never looked better.

icon_lol.gif

Fabulous cake!

Relznik Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 4:00pm
post #21 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by K8memphis-

I think it will be fine--make sure it is sealed well in a box that is then well covered in plastic wrap--I'd do two layers of plastic.




It's more likely to sweat and then go mouldy if you wrap it in plastic.

If she's insisting, then it just needs to stay in the cake box, somewhere cool and dry (not the fridge - depending, of course, on the type of buttercream you've used).

How far in advance of her receiving the cake did you bake it?

sknnypggy Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 4:36pm
post #22 of 30

I made the unicorn cake for my step daughter's party, and the bottom tier was served to guests, and the top tier was saved for the actual birthday (4 days later). My husbands ex wife said it was delicious, and she liked the flavor of the top teir, better than the bottom tier, (two different flavors). I wasn't to sure saving it for so long was good for the cake, but she placed it in the cake box and put it in the fridge. It was fondant covered. It had a strawberry whipped cream filling.

She was happy, (and this woman Despises ME) and if she was happy, then i don't think you have anything to worry about.

HTH

-K8memphis Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 10:07pm
post #23 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relznik

Quote:
Originally Posted by K8memphis-

I think it will be fine--make sure it is sealed well in a box that is then well covered in plastic wrap--I'd do two layers of plastic.



It's more likely to sweat and then go mouldy if you wrap it in plastic.

If she's insisting, then it just needs to stay in the cake box, somewhere cool and dry (not the fridge - depending, of course, on the type of buttercream you've used).

How far in advance of her receiving the cake did you bake it?




I mean it's six of one half dozen of another.

It shouldn't get sweaty until it undergoes a temperature change and comes out of the frige at which time the plastic can be removed.

I suggested the plastic in case someone puts their leftover french onion soup in there or reuben with extra kraut.

If it goes moldy from lenghth of time the plastic or no plastic will have no effect on that.

A scratch cake at room temperature for an extended period with fruit in it?
No thanks I'll pass.

I think the biggest problem is she made it too cute.

We need to make ugly cake so people will eat them huh.

luvbugcreations Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 10:18pm
post #24 of 30

HI

As I stated I did have a mom-to-be save her 2 tier cake top tier chocolate fudge cake with a peanutbutter filling and bc crumbcoat and fondant 2 tier was yellow with a chocolate fudge filling with a bc crumbcoat and fondant they ate it the following saturday night at a shower that her husbands friends where throwing for him. I don't advise this as I am all about freshness I never bake any of my cakes any earlier than 2 days before they are due. They ate it and everyone loved it they where so amazed at how moist and delicious they where. Go figure she did keep it in the refridgerator.

Thanks
Kerri
Luvbug creations

CakeMommyTX Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 10:20pm
post #25 of 30

So wait is this a new form of re-gifting happening here?
Re-Caking?
I can't wait until a groom saves his Red Velvet Armadillo cake for "the next wedding"...lol

luvbugcreations Posted 22 Aug 2009 , 10:22pm
post #26 of 30

Hi
as I posted on my rply to they didn't want to eat my cake. I had a mom-to-be refuse to cut my cake it was a 2 tier cake top being chocolate fudge with a peanut butter filling and bc crumbcoat and fondant covering 2 was yellow cake with a dark chocolate filling and bc crumbcoat and fondant to make a long story short she wanted to save it for the shower that her husband's friends where having for him the following saturday. she kept it in the fridge and everyone loved it they where saying how moist and delicious they where funny because I never bake any cake befor 2 days it is ready to go

lomfise Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 7:11am
post #27 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relznik

Quote:
Originally Posted by K8memphis-

I think it will be fine--make sure it is sealed well in a box that is then well covered in plastic wrap--I'd do two layers of plastic.



It's more likely to sweat and then go mouldy if you wrap it in plastic.

If she's insisting, then it just needs to stay in the cake box, somewhere cool and dry (not the fridge - depending, of course, on the type of buttercream you've used).

How far in advance of her receiving the cake did you bake it?




I baked it Wednesday and filled and decorated Thursday, so that's almost a week when she finally does eat it. I'm not too worried about the cake it self, nor the buttercream, it's the jam between the buttercream and cake I'm worried about. Won't it ooze into the cake and make it all soggy?

Well, I've (almost) reached a point of not caring about it anymore. I'm not going to the reception on Tuesday, but another of my collegies is, and I'll have her spread the word if there is any sign of the cake not being good.

Quote:
Originally Posted by K8memphis-

We need to make ugly cake so people will eat them huh.




I don't think I could do that, but if this is what happens, I will try. LOL

Relznik Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 9:00am
post #28 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by lomfise


it's the jam between the buttercream and cake I'm worried about. Won't it ooze into the cake and make it all soggy?




No - it'll be fine. icon_smile.gif

lomfise Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 3:33pm
post #29 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relznik

Quote:
Originally Posted by lomfise


it's the jam between the buttercream and cake I'm worried about. Won't it ooze into the cake and make it all soggy?




No - it'll be fine. icon_smile.gif




Thanks Relznik icon_biggrin.gif BTW I love your signature, I have one of those inside me too.

Cathy26 Posted 23 Aug 2009 , 9:03pm
post #30 of 30

I have this problem all the time particularly with one family who give me a LOT of business. the first cake i made was already 3 days old due to a number of orders that week but it was a christening cake so i assumed it would be all eaten at the christening on sunday - boy was i wrong. they loved it do much then waited until wednesday to even start cutting it but they said it was gorgeous - it was chocolate with chocolate buttercream,

it gets worse....they got a jam and buttercream madeira mothers day cake, took a week to start cutting it and were still eating it A MONTH later.... even recently, i made a mini topsy turvey for them and they kept it a full two weeks before eating it.

now they say the cakes are lovely and moist etc and i dont used perishable fillings, just buttercream and jam AND i give a slip of paper saying about dowels, storage of figures and not to eat them, and also that the cake will be good for a few days out of the fridge so im doing all i can but i definitly wish people would just get a cake and eat it at the event instead of just looking at it and then taking it home and waiting a fortnight to start it icon_sad.gif

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