What Is A 2 Layer Cake Mix

Decorating By kim_catt Updated 14 Aug 2009 , 2:10am by Kandy4283

kim_catt Posted 13 Aug 2009 , 10:40am
post #1 of 9

this may be a odd question, But i am going to ask it anyway.

A lot the wilton pans say, use one 2 layer cake mix. I have been told that all cake mixes are 2 layer cake mixes. I find that the no name and a few other brands, don't fill/bake the way they should to show the pans they way they should.

so my question to you is what mixes, do you recommend and/or what is the batter measurements they are talking about when saying (batter for a 2 layer cakes mix)?

8 replies
beachcakes Posted 13 Aug 2009 , 11:18am
post #2 of 9

You're right. a two layer cake mix is a regular box mix. Most box mixes make about the same amount, i know Duncan Hines makes slightly more batter. Here is a chart from wilton http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-party-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

indydebi Posted 13 Aug 2009 , 12:37pm
post #3 of 9

There is one cake mix I've seen on the shelf that is a one-layer cake, but you can see from the box that it's REALLY small. It's the "Jiffy" brand cake mix. It tastes really cheap, too, so I'd never recommend using it. (It was practically the only cake mix my mom ever used, but when you're stretching your grocery dollar to feed 6 kids, you always buy "cheap"!)

CutiePieCakes-Ontario Posted 13 Aug 2009 , 1:17pm
post #4 of 9

I use only Duncan Hines or Betty Crocker - never a no name mix. A box cake mix indicates "Makes 4 to 6 cups of batter". That's a big range, so I usually make 2 mixes, and then make a small cake for the family (or neighbours if we're sick of cake) or an 8" and freeze it for future use. Most Wilton pans need about 5 - 5 1/2 cups, but that, to me isn't enough either.

Total cost of making 1 cake mix is about $2.75 (mix, eggs, oil, water), so for the cost of double that, you save yourself the anguish of the cake not being tall enough (you still have to level it, and possibly torte, if you're brave enough), and the time it takes to bake another one (plus now you've had to use 3 mixes). BTW: You must use cake batter right away - you can't store it and use it later. Says so on the box.

HTH!

indydebi Posted 13 Aug 2009 , 1:22pm
post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by CutiePieCakes-Ontario

BTW: You must use cake batter right away - you can't store it and use it later. Says so on the box.




I think they put that on there just for CYA. I save batter in the 'frig all the time, for days, and it bakes up fine. I've frozen it in pans, taken it from freezer to oven, and it bakes up fine.

beachcakes Posted 13 Aug 2009 , 1:43pm
post #6 of 9

You can always use the cake extender recipe or WASC that are posted here in the recipe section. these will giv eyou more batter

CutiePieCakes-Ontario Posted 13 Aug 2009 , 1:54pm
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by CutiePieCakes-Ontario

BTW: You must use cake batter right away - you can't store it and use it later. Says so on the box.



I think they put that on there just for CYA. I save batter in the 'frig all the time, for days, and it bakes up fine. I've frozen it in pans, taken it from freezer to oven, and it bakes up fine.





Good to know, Debi. I'm still only baking for family and friends, so it's often a week or two between cakes - might as well use it up and let the kids decorate. But when I get going, I'll definitely remember this tip. Thanks.

Gingoodies Posted 13 Aug 2009 , 1:58pm
post #8 of 9

The cake mix extender recipe is great. I have used it many times. Usually it is just enough to make the cake full enough, and not a ton of batter left over to deal with.
It also makes your cake a little bit sturdier.

Kandy4283 Posted 14 Aug 2009 , 2:10am
post #9 of 9

This is all nice to know! I always thaught that you had to throw the extra batter out too! But I think that I might give this a try! thanks ccer's!!

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