What Ups Your Base Price?

Business By rharris524 Updated 28 Jun 2009 , 2:12am by cocorum21

rharris524 Posted 26 Jun 2009 , 6:31am
post #1 of 14

Most of you (so far as I can determine) have a base price for BC and one for fondant and then increase that price depending on what the customer wants. What are some of the things that you charge extra for and is it a per slice increase or is it just a tacked on extra charge?

13 replies
MLand Posted 26 Jun 2009 , 6:44am
post #2 of 14

I think it depends on what they get. If the cake is covered in fondant, then it is per slice. If they get say a bow, it is a set price. (I am gathering this from reading the posts, I could be unclear though)

indydebi Posted 26 Jun 2009 , 12:13pm
post #3 of 14

If they order a full buttercream cake, I have no upcharges. I don't charge extra for any design elements.... not for square cakes, basketweave, lace, number of BC roses, cake or filing flavors, etc. Flat price all the way.

Fondant cakes have a flat price per slice. That includes most fondant work/decors. Exceptions are bows, crowns, etc. .. pieces that require significant add'l work.

Mindy1975 Posted 26 Jun 2009 , 1:57pm
post #4 of 14

I guess I'm the odd ball here. I don't charge by the slice. I charge by size of cake ( which is basically number of servings) and then I charge by complexity of design. Whether it's fondant or buttercream. You can have two cakes, exactly the same size, and one could take twice as much time as the other, based solely on design. I'm a major stickler on getting paid for labor!

sari66 Posted 26 Jun 2009 , 9:43pm
post #5 of 14

I do exactly what indy does.

cocorum21 Posted 26 Jun 2009 , 10:16pm
post #6 of 14

fruit fillings -per serving
IMBC is more than ABC -per serving
Fondant -per serving
Fondant figures - per figure
Topsy Turvy cakes -per serving

kellertur Posted 27 Jun 2009 , 4:23am
post #7 of 14

How do you price figures or bows? May I ask what you charge?

Bonnie151 Posted 27 Jun 2009 , 6:23pm
post #8 of 14

I don't charge by serving - I don't know of anyone here who does. I charge by an hourly rate so each cake is individually priced according to how long it's going to take me. I do have a different hourly charge for wedding vs celebration cakes to cover the difference in overheads and I also charge a set price for cakes with just icing & ribbon (as mentioned in another thread it's a very high price!).

indydebi Posted 27 Jun 2009 , 6:49pm
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonnie151

I don't charge by serving - I don't know of anyone here who does. I charge by an hourly rate so each cake is individually priced according to how long it's going to take me. I do have a different hourly charge for wedding vs celebration cakes to cover the difference in overheads and I also charge a set price for cakes with just icing & ribbon (as mentioned in another thread it's a very high price!).



Under this pricing structure, I (a 30 year cake maker, who can whip 'em out really fast) would make less than the newbie, who has been making cakes for a year and it takes her 3 days to do a cake that I can do in 3 hours. I understand this works well for you ... just illustrating why I wouldn't prefer it.

And it all comes down to semantics. If I charged $50/hour for a 4 hour cake that served 100 people, it breaks down to $2/serving. In the reverse, I could take my $350 cake for 100, break it down to time and say I charge $100/hour.

Semantics.

1234me Posted 27 Jun 2009 , 8:55pm
post #10 of 14

I have a base price for buttercream cakes, regardless of the design on the cake. If they want fondant accents, bows, etc, I add an additional charger depending on what they want. Depending on the size of the cake, I usually add $15 for a bow and fondant accents. I feel like the bow charge is a fair price because it doesn't take me long to do it. I was looking at some competitors prices lately and saw that one locally charges $50 for a loopy bow - OUCH! People in this area just won't pay that for something they are not getting to eat. Maybe they charge that much because they really don't like making them. I can make thiem in 10 minutes so it is worth $15 to me.

Bonnie151 Posted 27 Jun 2009 , 9:11pm
post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Under this pricing structure, I (a 30 year cake maker, who can whip 'em out really fast) would make less than the newbie, who has been making cakes for a year and it takes her 3 days to do a cake that I can do in 3 hours. I understand this works well for you ... just illustrating why I wouldn't prefer it.




Except that I set my hourly rate much much higher than I would expect a newbie to set theirs (though some may be deluded enough to think that they can charge say $3000 for a three day cake that I'd charge $450 to cover three hours worth of work). Over here no one charges by serving - it's a completely different charging structure and my consultations tend to revolve around explaining the different amounts of work involved for various designs so that the customers understand why cake A on my website costs B vs cake X which costs Y. It's all about the total cake price here rather than per serving (and I'm not saying one approach is better than the other, just that I don't think in terms of per servings - semantics, yes).

kellertur Posted 27 Jun 2009 , 10:28pm
post #12 of 14

Sorry to ask this again, but my question may have been missed.

How are you pricing figures? Could anyone please give me an example of how much they charge?

Thank you. icon_smile.gif

Annabakescakes Posted 28 Jun 2009 , 1:27am
post #13 of 14

I do charge extra for basket weave, tons and tons of flowers, if they want cornelli (sp?) lace, bows...stuff like that. I start with a pretty low price though, because I do want most people to be able afford a basic and if they want a super fancy one, well, that's extra!

cocorum21 Posted 28 Jun 2009 , 2:12am
post #14 of 14

$15+ figures
$25 bows

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