Can I Make My Own Molds?

Decorating By mrsclox Updated 18 Jun 2009 , 5:10pm by varika

mrsclox Posted 18 Jun 2009 , 4:47am
post #1 of 13

I need a golf ball mold, but don't have time to find one online to order. Has anyone ever made their own molds???

12 replies
Texas_Rose Posted 18 Jun 2009 , 4:54am
post #2 of 13

If you mean to make a fondant golf ball, you could just roll a ball the right size and then use the end of a paintbrush or the pointed end of that white wilton ball tool, if you have one, to make the indentations.

Cookie4 Posted 18 Jun 2009 , 4:54am
post #3 of 13

I have a golf ball mold that I make white chocolate balls for grooms cakes which I purchased from a local supplier. Yes, you can make your own molds using the two part silicon from Make Your Own Molds, or you can use the stuff made by Crayola for modeling at Michaels or Hobby Lobby. It dries hard and is non-toxic, not food grade however, but I don't think it will hurt just to pour or push a substance into it for a few minutes. Hope this helps! thumbs_up.gif

shanna_banana Posted 18 Jun 2009 , 5:02am
post #4 of 13

I've made molds using hot glue. It takes quite a bit but works like a charm. You could cover the entire golf ball and then cut it in half to remove the ball. Then you have a two piece mold you can use for chocolate or fondant. HTH

FlourPots Posted 18 Jun 2009 , 7:35am
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by shanna_banana

I've made molds using hot glue. It takes quite a bit but works like a charm. You could cover the entire golf ball and then cut it in half to remove the ball. Then you have a two piece mold you can use for chocolate or fondant. HTH




Damn...that's brilliant!

kayla1505 Posted 18 Jun 2009 , 7:59am
post #6 of 13

I make my own molds all the time. I use amazing mold putty. its food safe and they sell it at micheals

shanna_banana Posted 18 Jun 2009 , 8:52am
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlourPots

Damn...that's brilliant!




Thanks FlourPots! icon_biggrin.gif It works great for seashells too.

ninatat Posted 18 Jun 2009 , 1:16pm
post #8 of 13

hot glue, gezzzzz i've been racking my brain trying to figure out what i can use to make swirls, and other shapes to decorate a butter cream, i do henna and alot of the shapes are the same but i have a problem with cemerty and i tried piping on a cake and just not good, thanks

bisbqueenb Posted 18 Jun 2009 , 2:41pm
post #9 of 13

You can use hot glue on acetate to make scroll type designs.... use a pattern book or a design form the internet....lay the acetate over the design and carefully follow the lines! Remember to use a mirror image to print out if you need things like alphabet letters that are directional. Let it cool, and you have a great flexible impression mat that will wrap around a curved surface.

traceyjade Posted 18 Jun 2009 , 2:49pm
post #10 of 13

Is hot glue food safe? If so that is so amazing thumbs_up.gif

lilboo529 Posted 18 Jun 2009 , 3:01pm
post #11 of 13

would the hot glue work on something flat? i want to make my husband a honda cake for fathers day i have the emblem just wasnt sure how to make the mold

ninatat Posted 18 Jun 2009 , 4:48pm
post #12 of 13

yes i think it would, i've used alot of hot glue, i don't know if you have one but get a small are very inexpensive, and the cool melt, it's not as near as hot as the others, you can get it from wallmart, you could try covering the logo with powdered sugar, or if you're using gum paste maybe a little vasasline, something that will make it release easy you'll have to remove gum paste faster because it might crack, hmmmm i think i'd use 50/50 gumpaste i thick gumpaste cracks. to easy i can't wait to make some but i'm in the middle of making people, i'm going to try and make my dad an air plane our of fondant, runway bottom cake and see if my son can make me a base so it looks like it taking off. let me know how the hot glue comes out

varika Posted 18 Jun 2009 , 5:10pm
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by bisbqueenb

You can use hot glue on acetate to make scroll type designs.... use a pattern book or a design form the internet....lay the acetate over the design and carefully follow the lines! Remember to use a mirror image to print out if you need things like alphabet letters that are directional. Let it cool, and you have a great flexible that will wrap around a curved surface.




I found out from a book at the library that you can use rubber stamps for this kind of thing, too--just was them in soapy water and don't use them with ink if you're using them on cake, the book said.

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