Homemade Rolled Buttercream Fondant~ Help!

Decorating By Country_girrl Updated 15 Jun 2009 , 1:00am by FlourPots

Country_girrl Posted 13 Jun 2009 , 12:46am
post #1 of 13

I had a baby shower cake that the customer requested rolled btrcrm fondant. I have used this one other time and it was o.k., but very hard to work with. Well, today was no exception and when I finished with it I was disapppointed with the outcome. I took it to the customer and the look on her face said it all. I was sick and by the look on her face, so was she.
My question is: Has anyone used this before? It was so hard to work with, the recipe called for 2 pounds of powder sugar, I used 3 and it was still wet feeling, so I continue to add more sugar, nothing made it any better. I am wondering if the humidity here has an effect on it and if so, what do I do?
I also made the bow for this out of Wilton fondant, and it still did not dry very good. I had 3 of the loops broke, keep in mind I made the parts on Monday. So it had 3 full days to dry. So when that happened I filled it in with ribbon. To say the least she looked disgusted! She offered me $10 for my supplies and then asked me if i would make her daughter a castle cake for her birthday. I dont get that. What would you do? The cake is the blue and white w/baby feet. Feedback please!

12 replies
rharris524 Posted 13 Jun 2009 , 1:55am
post #2 of 13

I've never worked with it before so I have no advice...this recipe seems to have decent reviews http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Rolled-Buttercream-Fondant/Detail.aspx

Anyhow, the cake isn't perfect but it isn't horrible either. If she was so disappointed as to only offer to cover supplies (assuming she didn't keep the cake) I wonder why she turned around and place another order.

HoodiesGoodies Posted 13 Jun 2009 , 5:18am
post #3 of 13

Fondant can be pretty hard to deal with especially if you are making it from scratch. And it is hard to say what went wrong when I am not really syre which recipe you used. I have made the fondant where you have to cook the sugar and water to a certain temp and let it cool slowly to a certain temp and if any of that goes wrong you might as well start over. And most definatley can be the humidity. Humidity has a tendency not to let things dry or when they do dry it id very brittle. If I was you I would probably try the pre made fondant more and try and work with that to get it to work. You can always add moisture and powder sugar to get it to the consistancy you need. You will just have to play with it more. Practice, practice, practice..... Hope this helps thumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif

schnumvf Posted 13 Jun 2009 , 5:35am
post #4 of 13

I only made rolled buttercream once. I've been wanting to make it again, but just haven't had a reason to. I think I'll just make a cake for fun though, I'd like to play with it some more.
It definitely has a different texture to it than your regular fondant (I generally use homemade marshmallow fondant) I think that if you were having things break you probably had too much powdered sugar. The one time I did make it I was surprised at it's slick texture. It was very shiny. I wondered if I measured properly. However, aside from the shine it tasted wonderful and looked great. I didn't have any problems with cracking and it didn't seem as delicate as mmf. Humidity does have an affect on all fondant. Icing too. So you will need to adjust if you are in a humid area, but I think an extra pound of sugar sounds like a lot. Not sure what went wrong there. Give it another try on something that doesn't really matter. It's not like regular fondant, thats for sure.
As for your customer placing another order...??? weird! Is this someone that you know? Is she just trying to rip you off? Was the cake really that bad? Her next order, was it still requesting rolled buttercream fondant? If you wanted to do it because you need/want the business go ahead but let her know that you have a $XX minimum order. $10 is a joke and doesn't cover supplies.

Country_girrl Posted 13 Jun 2009 , 7:06pm
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by rharris524

I've never worked with it before so I have no advice...this recipe seems to have decent reviews http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Rolled-Buttercream-Fondant/Detail.aspx

Anyhow, the cake isn't perfect but it isn't horrible either. If she was so disappointed as to only offer to cover supplies (assuming she didn't keep the cake) I wonder why she turned around and place another order.




She did keep the cake and I wouldn't have accepted the $10 for the life of me. I realize the cake was not perfect however. I felt like $10 for my supplies was an isult. It came nowhere near covering them. 3 cakeboards, fancifoil, cake box, just for starters nearly adds up to that. I also gave her pictures of all of the cakes that I have done to this point, and told her up front, my experience with fondant was minimum. I don't think I could have been anymore honest with her. She was disappointed it didn't "look like the picture" she gave me from the internet. Uhhhh no, it didn't because she had marked through 80% of the cake and made changes...all I know is I did the best I could with what I had to work with.

Country_girrl Posted 13 Jun 2009 , 7:10pm
post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by schnumvf

I only made rolled buttercream once. I've been wanting to make it again, but just haven't had a reason to. I think I'll just make a cake for fun though, I'd like to play with it some more.
It definitely has a different texture to it than your regular fondant (I generally use homemade marshmallow fondant) I think that if you were having things break you probably had too much powdered sugar. The one time I did make it I was surprised at it's slick texture. It was very shiny. I wondered if I measured properly. However, aside from the shine it tasted wonderful and looked great. I didn't have any problems with cracking and it didn't seem as delicate as mmf. Humidity does have an affect on all fondant. Icing too. So you will need to adjust if you are in a humid area, but I think an extra pound of sugar sounds like a lot. Not sure what went wrong there. Give it another try on something that doesn't really matter. It's not like regular fondant, thats for sure.
As for your customer placing another order...??? weird! Is this someone that you know? Is she just trying to rip you off? Was the cake really that bad? Her next order, was it still requesting rolled buttercream fondant? If you wanted to do it because you need/want the business go ahead but let her know that you have a $XX minimum order. $10 is a joke and doesn't cover supplies.




I know who she is but do not know her intimately. I couldn't believe that she askme to make another one at the moment she looked so disgusted. Makes me wonder why she did that, especially after not paying anything for the first one. I was very upfront about their would be no more of that fondant. PERIOD! Also, I would have to really consider it...I just dont want her to bad mouth my work and be the cause of any bad publicity. So.... all I can say is if she really was disappointed and felt like she shouldn't pay so be it. If she did rip me off I have to believe that she will get that back ten fold.

amielyn Posted 13 Jun 2009 , 7:20pm
post #7 of 13

I just wanted to add, rolled buttercream is not the same as fondant. Rolled buttercream is simply a thickened buttercream. It does not have anything in it to give the elasticity that fondant has. Rolled buttercream can be used to cover cakes, but it is not as easy to work with as fondant. I would recomend using marshmallow fondant, or a ready made like Satin Ice, until you get the hang of it. Don't give up on fondant because of this!

Country_girrl Posted 13 Jun 2009 , 7:25pm
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by amielyn

I just wanted to add, rolled buttercream is not the same as fondant. Rolled buttercream is simply a thickened buttercream. It does not have anything in it to give the elasticity that fondant has. Rolled buttercream can be used to cover cakes, but it is not as easy to work with as fondant. I would recomend using marshmallow fondant, or a ready made like , until you get the hang of it. Don't give up on fondant because of this!




WOW! Thank you! I am not giving up on it, it makes me only want to work more with it. I am pretty hard on myself, and something like this only gives me more drive to improve! I really appreciate you letting me know that, it makes better sense to me now. Thank you!!!

BlakesCakes Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 3:14am
post #9 of 13

Rolled buttercream and good fondant are two very different animals and in no way act the same when it comes to covering cakes.

When I work with RBC, I'm usually covering some odd shape like a sphere. I measure out how much I'll need for covering, roll it out, and then transfer the piece to the fridge or freezer. I let it stiffen up completely and then put it on the counter for a few minutes. I drape it over the object to be covered, rub my hands with a combo of CS & PS, and mold the RBC to the cake. I then buff it more with a combo of CS & PS.

I like the RBC for some things, dislike it for others. It's self healing with the heat of your hand, so repairs are easy, but fact is, it's hard to get it completely smooth. I also find that I have to roll it much thicker than fondant in order to work with it. It's also just too sweet in any quantity--it makes your teeth hurt.

That woman got a great deal for $10. Personally, I'd have taken the cake home if she'd offered me $10 and told her to go to the nearest grocery store and spend the $ there.

Her asking for another cake makes me wonder if she thinks she can get another one so cheap. If you really want to do another cake for her, I suggest making certain that she understands that the final price is it--or no cake.

HTH
Rae

Minstrelmiss Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 3:27am
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by rharris524

Anyhow, the cake isn't perfect but it isn't horrible either. If she was so disappointed as to only offer to cover supplies (assuming she didn't keep the cake) I wonder why she turned around and place another order.





She ordered another cake because she only paid $10 for the first one!!!

Country_girrl Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 2:58pm
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minstrelmiss

Quote:
Originally Posted by rharris524

Anyhow, the cake isn't perfect but it isn't horrible either. If she was so disappointed as to only offer to cover supplies (assuming she didn't keep the cake) I wonder why she turned around and place another order.




She ordered another cake because she only paid $10 for the first one!!!




Correction....she did not pay anything for this cake! She got a free cake, I am sure that is why she wanted me to do another one. After thinking about this situation nonstop, I have decided it would be in my best interest to cut myself loose from anymore dealings with her. I am sure there is no way that I would ever be able to please her. So why put anytime or money into something that I know the outcome will not be a pleasant one.

Win Posted 14 Jun 2009 , 3:14pm
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

Rolled buttercream and good fondant are two very different animals and in no way act the same when it comes to covering cakes.




Correct! (...and Rae would know so well!) Rolled buttercream wants to stretch and slide. It's more work than fondant altogether. I have seen some designers combine fondant and rolled buttercream for a different medium, and that seems to be a much more workable formula.

Your cake was worth much more than the insult of $10.00... and I would agree that you should not deal with this person again. She has set a standard of making you feel inferior, and would therefore (IMO) forever make you feel as if your cakes are not worth much.

The only thing I might have done differently was to scrap the entire top bow of fondant and replace all of it with real ribbon rather than intermix the two... even then, it does not look bad, it would have just been more consistent.

FlourPots Posted 15 Jun 2009 , 1:00am
post #13 of 13

From what I've read here at CC, rolled buttercream seems to work very well for covering cookies, not cake.

For cake, you should combine it with fondant...2/3's rolled bc with 1/3 fondant, or 1/2 and 1/2.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%