Refrigerate Fondant Cakes??

Business By oksugar Updated 22 Apr 2009 , 4:43am by oksugar

oksugar Posted 19 Apr 2009 , 4:11am
post #1 of 12

hi guys,

I am getting ready to start ordering equipment for my cake shop this week!! (been doing cakes about 4 years and working towards a shop)

A big question I have is whether to buy a refrigerated display case for my ready to go cakes or just a nice display case. I mostly do fondant covered cakes and plan to stick to that but I will have cupcakes also. I don't want the cakes to condensate and ruin the finish but I want them to stay fresh longer! We are thinking we should just keep the temp barely cool, but it will be an experiment and the cases are very expensive!

Any experience or thoughts?

Thanks a'bunch

11 replies
Santa_Kitchen Posted 19 Apr 2009 , 4:16am
post #2 of 12

I refrigerate all my cakes, including fondant ones...i never had problems with condensation, or running fondant...at least my experience.

madgeowens Posted 19 Apr 2009 , 4:17am
post #3 of 12

Everything I have read has said not to refrigerate fondant because of the condensaton marks it gets. Personally I don't like my cakes refrigerated either, but thats me, maybe thats why I make all our cakes instead of buying.

CRykens Posted 19 Apr 2009 , 4:22am
post #4 of 12

I typically let the filling type dictate whether I refrigerate, however, I would think that if you kept them at a cool temperature you shouldn't have a problem. Even when I have refrigerated my fondant cakes, they have come out fine if you allow them to cool to room temperature.
Good luck with the new business!! thumbs_up.gif

oksugar Posted 19 Apr 2009 , 4:40am
post #5 of 12

Nice! I normally don't refrigerate my custom cakes but if I make ready to go cakes it seems like the should be refrigerated.

I'm so excited about the new shop and this forum has been very informative!

Bluehue Posted 19 Apr 2009 , 5:08am
post #6 of 12

I never refridgerate my *covered* cakes once completed.
Even if you don't see the condensation already starting to form on the outside - it is coming - trust me....even if it is minute beading.
Not only that - that very fine line between the Fondant and the cake starts to sweat on the inside - and that can become quite a tacky sticky area when people go to eat the cake.

If your shop is a/conditioned then that that would be cool enough for your cakes to be on display *ready for sale*.
Taking them out of a fridge - into the shop - into someones car - then into a venue - hmmmm, thats alot of different variable temperatures for one cake.

Opinions may vary as it also depends where you live and what the temperature range is.
There is high humidity here in the Summer time - thus another reason why i do not refridgerate my cakes...as that will surely make them sweat once coming out of the fridge.

Wishing you all the best with your new venture icon_smile.gif
Bluehue

MaisieBake Posted 19 Apr 2009 , 5:45am
post #7 of 12

If you're not refrigerating, you're committing to fillings and icing that are safe and legal at room temp.

Do you want to do that?

brincess_b Posted 19 Apr 2009 , 9:29am
post #8 of 12

refridgerated cake = stale cake. it dries out, so it doesnt stay fresh longer. doesnt seem to be such a problem when your cake is sealed in with icing, but say on a cupcake with exposed edges, you migt have problems?
so as long as the area is cool, and your products dont need refridgerated (whether thats to do with the recipe or the law - some places need everything refridgerated) why bother? who wants to eat cold cake?
xx

Deb_ Posted 19 Apr 2009 , 12:34pm
post #9 of 12

Yeah, I agree..........unless you have *professional humidity controlled* refrigeration, (which it sounds like you will) I don't ever refrigerate.

If you have perishable fillings or whipped cream toppings then by all means you NEED to refrigerate those.

I bake exclusively from scratch and my butter recipes HATE the fridge, it definitely dries them out quicker.

Legally I can't sell anything perishable, so it's not an issue with me, my recipes have all been approved by the HD as shelf stable at room temp. phew.......... icon_biggrin.gif

Hey by the way BEST OF LUCK TO YOU IN YOUR NEW BUSINESS!!!! That's so awesome, I wish you much success. icon_smile.gif

solascakes Posted 19 Apr 2009 , 12:55pm
post #10 of 12

oksugar best of luck in your new bussiness.Sorry i do not have any advice for you but personally i don't do cakes in the fridge.

oksugar Posted 22 Apr 2009 , 4:42am
post #11 of 12

ok, we have decided to get a dry pastry display case. Something to make the cakes look nice icon_smile.gif

My cakes don't require refridgeration so I guess why take the chance of drying them out.

Thanks everyone for helping me make a decision!!

oksugar Posted 22 Apr 2009 , 4:43am
post #12 of 12

ok, we have decided to get a dry pastry display case. Something to make the cakes look nice icon_smile.gif

My cakes don't require refridgeration so I guess why take the chance of drying them out.

Thanks everyone for helping me make a decision!!

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