Furious, But Relieved...what My 4 Year Old Did

Decorating By SpringFlour Updated 25 Apr 2009 , 11:58pm by LisaR64

SpringFlour Posted 17 Apr 2009 , 3:40pm
post #1 of 17

Today is my son's 4th birthday. He had told me that he wanted a Star Wars cake. He was very specific about the characters he wanted and how it should look. I made a Lego Luke Skywalker, in his orange x-wing fighter suit, out of gumpaste. I also made a little R2D2. They actually turned out really well...better than I expected. My husband even wrote me a little note (ships passing in the night) saying that I had "outdone myself" with the figures. icon_smile.gif I had planned to make the x-wing fighter tonight for his party cake.

I showed my kids the figures last night, then put them away to keep drying.

Well, this morning, when I came downstairs, my 4 year old told me, "I lost Luke." My first reaction was to be pis*ed off. icon_mad.gificon_mad.gif We searched the kitchen for Luke, and I asked my son where he went with him, but getting a 4 year old to answer questions is pretty tricky. icon_razz.gif Then I figured of course he ate Luke. I looked in his mouth, but there was no orange in his teeth. He insisted that he DID NOT eat him. Yes, I believe him.

Although I was furious at first, I realized that I am now relieved. I didn't actually want to make the x-wing fighter. icon_wink.gif Now I'm off the hook. I told him that since he wasn't careful with the parts of his Star Wars cake, he doesn't get a Star Wars cake. This just means that tonight I actually get to sleep and not stay up all night making a complicated cake. I'm going to just make a simple square camo cake. He'll still love it, and I get to sleep tonight!

I'm sure Luke will turn up as I'm finishing the camo cake.

Lesson learned: NEVER leave cake parts where the kids can see them. icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

16 replies
miss-tiff Posted 18 Apr 2009 , 2:41am
post #2 of 17

That's actually kind of cute that he wanted to play with your figure, although I would be frustrated, too.

I'm wondering just where he'll turn up??

xstitcher Posted 18 Apr 2009 , 6:54am
post #3 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by miss-tiff

That's actually kind of cute that he wanted to play with your figure, although I would be frustrated, too.

I'm wondering just where he'll turn up??




Been there done that. I've had way to many "accidents" when it comes to cakes in this house icon_lol.gif . I always do my figures well into the night (really I should say morning) and my DH always goes hunting for them the next day when he gets up for work. I never leave them anywhere the kids can get them now......... icon_biggrin.gif

lostincake Posted 18 Apr 2009 , 7:11am
post #4 of 17

Awww...sorry to hear (and happy too?)!

My DS turns 4 soon too and funny thing, he has also told me what his cake should look like and has pretty much designed the whole thing by himself. I kinda wish he would cause an "accident" so I don't have to do the Tidmouths Shed part of the Thomas cake he wants. I JUST finished the Gordon train out of MMF and that took me 5 hours! After that, I don't want to tackle the shed since it will require that I carve it and I have NEVER carved a cake and don't look forward to it lol.

But what we agree to for our kids....

You are a wonderful mom for trying but I don't blame you for being relieved.

icon_biggrin.gif

-K8memphis Posted 18 Apr 2009 , 12:49pm
post #5 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringFlour

Today is my son's 4th birthday. He had told me that he wanted a Star Wars cake. He was very specific about the characters he wanted and how it should look. I made a Lego Luke Skywalker, in his orange x-wing fighter suit, out of gumpaste. I also made a little R2D2. They actually turned out really well...better than I expected. My husband even wrote me a little note (ships passing in the night) saying that I had "outdone myself" with the figures. icon_smile.gif I had planned to make the x-wing fighter tonight for his party cake.

I showed my kids the figures last night, then put them away to keep drying.

Well, this morning, when I came downstairs, my 4 year old told me, "I lost Luke." My first reaction was to be pis*ed off. icon_mad.gificon_mad.gif We searched the kitchen for Luke, and I asked my son where he went with him, but getting a 4 year old to answer questions is pretty tricky. icon_razz.gif Then I figured of course he ate Luke. I looked in his mouth, but there was no orange in his teeth. He insisted that he DID NOT eat him. Yes, I believe him.

Although I was furious at first, I realized that I am now relieved. I didn't actually want to make the x-wing fighter. icon_wink.gif Now I'm off the hook. I told him that since he wasn't careful with the parts of his Star Wars cake, he doesn't get a Star Wars cake. This just means that tonight I actually get to sleep and not stay up all night making a complicated cake. I'm going to just make a simple square camo cake. He'll still love it, and I get to sleep tonight!

I'm sure Luke will turn up as I'm finishing the camo cake.

Lesson learned: NEVER leave cake parts where the kids can see them. icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif




I don't know--he should not have amputated Luke permanently but I'm a softie--I would still make him the Starwars cake sans Luke. I mean he's only 4.

I don't know I mean I know how fragile these creations are but a 4 year old would not really realize this. It would look like an action figure to them no?

Again, I'm a softie and I raised a hyperactive child too but I would make the SW cake--maybe scale it back but it seems like a discipline is intertwined in his birthday celebration. When it's only natural for a kid to go for a new toy.

I had to choose my battles carefully and I would have overlooked this in a heartbeat--just me. If he was 8 or 9 it'd be a different story. And I kept my stuff well protected from inquisitive minds and little hands. I woulda never peaked his interest in advance! But we all learn the hard way huh.

I remember one time my son (about age 3 I guess) took my icing spatula and was 'icing' the nightstand in his bedroom. First implulse (OMG AGH!!!! but I surpressed it.) Because, one, it was the right height for him. Two, he was doing what Momma does. No spanking no scolding. Just explained how & when to 'decorate.' He's 25 and a chef now. icon_biggrin.gif

I know he will love his camo cake that his Moma makes for him.

Spuddysmom Posted 18 Apr 2009 , 1:30pm
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by k8memphis

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpringFlour

Today is my son's 4th birthday. He had told me that he wanted a Star Wars cake. He was very specific about the characters he wanted and how it should look. I made a Lego Luke Skywalker, in his orange x-wing fighter suit, out of gumpaste. I also made a little R2D2. They actually turned out really well...better than I expected. My husband even wrote me a little note (ships passing in the night) saying that I had "outdone myself" with the figures. icon_smile.gif I had planned to make the x-wing fighter tonight for his party cake.

I showed my kids the figures last night, then put them away to keep drying.

Well, this morning, when I came downstairs, my 4 year old told me, "I lost Luke." My first reaction was to be pis*ed off. icon_mad.gificon_mad.gif We searched the kitchen for Luke, and I asked my son where he went with him, but getting a 4 year old to answer questions is pretty tricky. icon_razz.gif Then I figured of course he ate Luke. I looked in his mouth, but there was no orange in his teeth. He insisted that he DID NOT eat him. Yes, I believe him.

Although I was furious at first, I realized that I am now relieved. I didn't actually want to make the x-wing fighter. icon_wink.gif Now I'm off the hook. I told him that since he wasn't careful with the parts of his Star Wars cake, he doesn't get a Star Wars cake. This just means that tonight I actually get to sleep and not stay up all night making a complicated cake. I'm going to just make a simple square camo cake. He'll still love it, and I get to sleep tonight!

I'm sure Luke will turn up as I'm finishing the camo cake.

Lesson learned: NEVER leave cake parts where the kids can see them. icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif



I don't know--he should not have amputated Luke permanently but I'm a softie--I would still make him the Starwars cake sans Luke. I mean he's only 4.

I don't know I mean I know how fragile these creations are but a 4 year old would not really realize this. It would look like an action figure to them no?

Again, I'm a softie and I raised a hyperactive child too but I would make the SW cake--maybe scale it back but it seems like a discipline is intertwined in his birthday celebration. When it's only natural for a kid to go for a new toy.

I had to choose my battles carefully and I would have overlooked this in a heartbeat--just me. If he was 8 or 9 it'd be a different story. And I kept my stuff well protected from inquisitive minds and little hands. I woulda never peaked his interest in advance! But we all learn the hard way huh.

I remember one time my son (about age 3 I guess) took my icing spatula and was 'icing' the nightstand in his bedroom. First implulse (OMG AGH!!!! but I surpressed it.) Because, one, it was the right height for him. Two, he was doing what Momma does. No spanking no scolding. Just explained how & when to 'decorate.' He's 25 and a chef now. icon_biggrin.gif

I know he will love his camo cake that his Moma makes for him.


Sorry to hear about Luke's mysterious disapperance - he will definitely show up again - at least parts of him. Not exactly cake but when my youngest was that age I had just finished proofing a young adult historical fiction novel I'd taken many many months to write. Left the room for a lunch break. Returned to find my youngest "playing with the trash can" icon on the computer. Yup, deleted the entire thing, no back up copy, and I couldn't restore it. Had to leave the room for a while....... rewrote the book, raised the child (now 22) and learned about backing up files. Your little guy should love whatever you come up with even if it is just R2D2 on a rocky surfaced moon.

sweetjan Posted 18 Apr 2009 , 1:42pm
post #7 of 17

What your baby will remember is that he played with the coolest Luke that his mom had made for his birthday! That's all that matters, really! icon_biggrin.gif

costumeczar Posted 18 Apr 2009 , 1:46pm
post #8 of 17

When my son was in kindergarten he took a pencil and picked the tips off of the lace wraps that I'd put on a dummy cake. EVERY... SINGLE... TIP. I had to redo the entire thing, so this is what happened to him:

-No field trip to the circus with his kindergarten class
-No bike for a week
-I returned a birthday present that he received and really liked.

As a result, he has NEVER touched another cake. My husband said that I was being too hard on him, but I told him it was the same as if he'd taken one of my husband's reports that he'd been working on for his job and ripped it up, making it necessary to redo the entire thing.

4 year olds can tell the difference between what they should touch and what they shouldn't, and if he didn't before he will now! You have to make an impression on him. I do feel kind of sorry for him, but you did the right thing to teach him not to touch things you're working on. You're lucky, the same way I was, that it was something that wasn't for someone else. If it had been for a wedding cake I'd have been up the creek.

You can feel sorry for kids and still discipline them the right way, that's the paradox of parenting icon_rolleyes.gif

KookieKris Posted 18 Apr 2009 , 1:52pm
post #9 of 17

So sorry to hear about what happened! Atleast it was his own cake and not a cake for a customer! I've had many "accidents" involving cakes and kids and the only thing that kept me going was a large dose of wine and a prayer for sanity!

Good Luck with the cake whatever you decide to do!

solascakes Posted 18 Apr 2009 , 1:54pm
post #10 of 17

Whatever you end up making,he will love it,kids love cake even if it's not exactly what he wants.

-K8memphis Posted 18 Apr 2009 , 2:00pm
post #11 of 17

I think he should still get some kind of Star Wars cake though. I mean Mommy made the Luke for him--clearly he knew he shouldn't play with it which is why he got it when she wasn't around.

I never let my stuff out where my son could get inquisitive. I drew big bold lines that did not move. Never had to discipline him for vandalizing any of my cake stuff. Crumb coating the nightstand yes (though just a talking to) getting into any cake stuff--not to this day.

julzs71 Posted 18 Apr 2009 , 2:07pm
post #12 of 17

Good Luck on your cake. I might have done what you are doing also, or I would have just put some plastic men on it. Either way, have fun.

741mly Posted 18 Apr 2009 , 2:26pm
post #13 of 17

I am sorry, But I laugh just thinking how magical kids are!...He is just a kid acting as his age, You did a wonderfull job, So he got exited...I have a 19 y/o and a 10 y/o. Before I got sick everything had to be perfect, But Know I could look back to the little things that my kids did with other meaning...I laugh...They are just little people learning from every experience they had. One day you are going to be sitting in a sofa looking back laughing at everything that your kids did. I could imagine his face...hahahahaha Happy birthday to him anyway!...Take care mom and enjoy every little time you spend with him!

-K8memphis Posted 18 Apr 2009 , 2:59pm
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spuddysmom


... when my youngest was that age I had just finished proofing a young adult historical fiction novel I'd taken many many months to write. Left the room for a lunch break. Returned to find my youngest "playing with the trash can" icon on the computer. Yup, deleted the entire thing, no back up copy, and I couldn't restore it. Had to leave the room for a while....... rewrote the book, raised the child (now 22) and learned about backing up files. Your little guy should love whatever you come up with even if it is just R2D2 on a rocky surfaced moon.




Omg Omg I'm sill inhaling all the air out of the room.
Oh Oh Oh that hurt!
That whole Guppie eat the young thing starts making sense at times like these.
icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

When he was two--we lived in a little apartment and I had borrowed a sewing machine--I had just set it up on the coffee table and was sitting on the edge of the couch checking it out--he was standing on the couch behind me leaning over my shoulder real quiet, peaceful just absorbed in watching-me not realizing how absorbed.

I took out the bobbon shuttle--looked like a tiny space capsule--(I'm laughing already remembering this) Out of the blue he dives for it like a peilican snatching his dinner out of the sea, "Oooooh gimme dat!" he crooned with such passion in total fascination & he had sucha grip on it, me being caught completely unawares.

It happened so fast and he was pin point accurate, got his little fingers wrapped around it~ I could hardly get my breath I was laughing so hard I could not hang onto it or him. He took off for parts unknown. And somehow we found it and my mil's sewing machine was returned asap.

icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

pastryjen Posted 18 Apr 2009 , 3:25pm
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

When my son was in kindergarten he took a pencil and picked the tips off of the lace wraps that I'd put on a dummy cake. EVERY... SINGLE... TIP. I had to redo the entire thing, so this is what happened to him:

-No field trip to the circus with his kindergarten class
-No bike for a week
-I returned a birthday present that he received and really liked.

As a result, he has NEVER touched another cake. My husband said that I was being too hard on him, but I told him it was the same as if he'd taken one of my husband's reports that he'd been working on for his job and ripped it up, making it necessary to redo the entire thing.




I know my friends think I am hard with my punishments when I have to give them. But all I hear from them is how their kids are misbehaving all the time and I'm so lucky I have good kids icon_confused.gif

2 yrs ago, my kids were dd5 and ds3. They got into their first and only fist/kicking fight. Since we don't allow play fighting/aggressive behaviour this was huge.

Kids were went to room at 4 pm

Got out for 30 min to eat dinner (only healthy foods, no dessert)

Back to their rooms until next morning (they only have teddies and books in their room)

Evening at friends with a babysitter was cancelled.


I missed out on going out with the girls but...they've not done it since. My son still hits his sister once in a while but there is no brawl.

nechee Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 10:08pm
post #16 of 17

This reminds me of when I was in the second Wilton Class. I was making my royal icing flowers and I could not find the bag of pink icing that had my 101 tip on it. After looking for it and realizing my husband was asleep on the couch and not watching the three kids (3, 2, and 1 at the time) I finally found my three year old son, in his bedroom with pink royal icing everywhere!!! It was all over his bed, his curtains and the walls and carpet. It is very hard to get the stains out of white carpet btw. The red curtains he had in his room still show the marks of the pink icing.
Fast forward to this year and my sons 5th birthday. I had just finished his Eve from Wall-e cake, turned aroudn to get my camera and when I turned back there was a very neat finger mark through eves black eyes.

LisaR64 Posted 25 Apr 2009 , 11:58pm
post #17 of 17

I once taught pre-k and kindergarten and believe me, it's easy to tell the children who face consequences for their actions from the children who are never held accountable for their actions. Teach them young, because it's a hard lesson to learn later on. That said....I can't even discipline my dog like I should, so who am I to be giving advise icon_wink.gif

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