Drying?

Decorating By krysoco Updated 19 Feb 2009 , 7:07am by Marianna46

krysoco Posted 18 Jan 2009 , 4:39am
post #1 of 10

My DH got me a new oven. I really like it. The problem is that my cakes/cookies keep coming out dry. icon_mad.gif That's the only diff. thing. I'm using the same recipes & ingredients that I've always used. Any suggestions? I never had this problem before. I'm grateful for my new stove but I'm wanting my old one back. icon_cry.gif We had been together for such a long time and we worked really good together. icon_lol.gif J/j I'm wondering what the problem is.

TIA

9 replies
4kids Posted 18 Jan 2009 , 12:54pm
post #2 of 10

Put a thermometer in your new oven and test the different temperatures. Your new oven is probably at a higher temp than your old one and you may have to adjust your recipes. Take a deep breath. Once you play with it enough and figure out its quirks, you will love it just as much.

krysoco Posted 19 Jan 2009 , 4:31am
post #3 of 10

Thank you. I'm def. going to have to do that.

Rose_N_Crantz Posted 30 Jan 2009 , 12:10am
post #4 of 10

That's what it sounds like to me. I'm sure that new oven is really nice and toasty and you're just not used to that. It's like when someone gets a new car and they keep speeding on accident. Good luck!

This is a good excuse to get one of those fancy probe thermometers with a timer. That's if you don't already have one.

glendaleAZ Posted 31 Jan 2009 , 9:08pm
post #5 of 10

Do you go by the time listed on the recipe? If so, you may want to think about using your nose. Seriously, a finished cake can be smelled throughout the house. I never go by the time listed with a recipe or box.

Also, I always check my cakes for doneness by using a toothpick, and when it comes out with small little crumbs sticking to the toothpick (not liquid crumbs, but cake crumbs) I remove it form the oven, I do not wait for the toothpick to come out clean.

My co-workers always tell me that my cakes are very moist. And, in my department we have a graduate from a culinary arts school, and they still buy my cakes instead of hers.

cylstrial Posted 31 Jan 2009 , 10:04pm
post #6 of 10

Once you figure out how your oven bakes.. you won't have any trouble. Mine is really hot. I bake my sugar cookies for 5 minutes and sometimes they are still overdone with 5 minutes!

indydebi Posted 31 Jan 2009 , 10:15pm
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by glendaleAZ

Do you go by the time listed on the recipe? If so, you may want to think about using your nose. Seriously, a finished cake can be smelled throughout the house. I never go by the time listed with a recipe or box.



Agree. I find the time listed on the recipe to be merely a suggestion. Remember, everyone's oven is different and everyone likes their cakes/cookies different (I like mine soft ... have a friend who likes her's (what I call) rock hard and (what she calls) crispy.

I haven't used a timer in years.

krysoco Posted 2 Feb 2009 , 7:53pm
post #8 of 10

No, I dont follow cooking times. I usually just "eyeball" it. I baked a cake today. I lowered the temp to 315 then eventually to 300. The center was like jello but the top and edges were turing golden brown (yellow butter cake).
I'll have to get a thermometer.

Tatti74 Posted 18 Feb 2009 , 8:13pm
post #9 of 10

I also don't follow cooking time, but I place a pan of water in the oven (below the cake) while baking the cake and my cake is always moist. I don't use thermometer

Marianna46 Posted 19 Feb 2009 , 7:07am
post #10 of 10

The pan of water under the cake pan is a great idea, Tatti74. I'm certainly going to try it out. I don't have an oven thermometer either, although I'm on the lookout for one, but I go more by smell and start checking for doneness way before the time is up. It's paid off many times. Now the only thing I generally burn are cupcakes! Oh, well, one of these days...

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