Tips For An Upsidedown Wedding Cake...

Decorating By Jennifer9800 Updated 16 Jan 2009 , 5:35pm by Jennifer9800

Jennifer9800 Posted 31 Dec 2008 , 10:08am
post #1 of 8

Ok, So there is this amazing florist in my town and he had a birthday and I made his cake. We are friends and I know how he is..go big or go home. SO, I made his birthday cake upsidedown with the smaller tier on the bottom, etc. roughly 6,8,10" squares. It was a HIT!!! The bottom tiers were foam and the top was real cake because we didn't need that many servings. I now have a couple who have booked this cake for a wedding in April. The cake will be 2-8,12,16" rounds. I have an idea of the internal structure...pipe throught the middle, wooden cake boards and base, etc. but wanted to see if anyone else has attempted this type of cake for any hints. I included a picture of the cake I did for my friend to give a reference but this cake will be triple the size. Share any tips/hints or prayers! haha.
LL

7 replies
sasporella Posted 31 Dec 2008 , 10:21am
post #2 of 8

Sorry i have no advice on a cake like this....but i just wanted to say WOW!!!! what a fantastic cake. It looks stunning. thumbs_up.gif

FlourPots Posted 31 Dec 2008 , 12:58pm
post #3 of 8

There's an upside down cake posted in the galleries called the "Divorce Cake": http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1184694

and the decorator posted an instruction sheet: http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1185229

KHalstead Posted 31 Dec 2008 , 1:13pm
post #4 of 8

I imagine it wouldn't be any different than any other wedding cake except that you wouldn't want to make each descending tier too much smaller than the previous........you're going to need a very sturdy cake circle under each cake and that should support it all! The tricky part is going to be icing the underside of the cake plates.

Frankyola Posted 1 Jan 2009 , 9:33am
post #5 of 8

Thank You for posting this i will try it. thumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif , just to practice and fun. icon_smile.gif

Jennifer9800 Posted 16 Jan 2009 , 2:34pm
post #6 of 8

Thanks for the pic and instruction post. What I was thinking is using steel pipe in the middle attached to plywood with a flange. I have a cake corer so I was going to core, support like a typical cake and stack the next one. Keep in my my top tier is TWO 16" rounds which is why I'm not using a center wooden support. with the top being so heavy I'm going to use dowels in the cake instead of the boba tea straws I usually use in a typical cake. I am going to use the wilton cake plates because they are so heavy. I'm debating on using thin plywood too at least on the biggest round. Hmmm....It's not till april so we have time for trials. Thanks for the advice, or words of encouragement!! My husband loves any cake we have to go to lowes for!

melvin01 Posted 16 Jan 2009 , 5:20pm
post #7 of 8

That's awesome! So nice when you can get your husband excited about any kind of cake baking!

The cake you did is so awesome, no wonder you have people wanting it! Definitely look at the divorce cake template and picture. It was done so well and is a very popular idea. Since you have time, I would experiment if you can.

Being me, I would prefer to assemble on site if possible, as opposed to driving with something that is top-heavy (I just HATE turns!). Even with all of the support, it will still be heavy and cumbersome so if you can put the top tiers on when you arrive, it may help with some of the stress.

Good luck with it and make sure to post some pictures--I cannot wait to see what it ends up looking like!

Jennifer9800 Posted 16 Jan 2009 , 5:35pm
post #8 of 8

no doubt! Assembling on site is definitely in my plans too. I do want to do a trial..just still working on the infrastrcuture! I'll post the final when I'm done. THANKS!!!

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