How Much To Charge For Biscotti?

Business By missmeg Updated 6 Nov 2008 , 3:27pm by missmeg

missmeg Posted 5 Nov 2008 , 8:09pm
post #1 of 7

I mentioned to a coworker that I'm making biscotti this year, and she's interested in purchasing a dozen or so bars. I have no idea how much to charge for this. Any clues? I have 3 flavors: classic, dipped in chocolate; dark chocolate with almonds; and lemon with white choc chips. Also, what would be the best way to package them?

6 replies
Sweet_Guys Posted 6 Nov 2008 , 12:59am
post #2 of 7

Hey, Miss Meg!

We would do it one of two ways: We would either treat it like a cookie and charge it on a per cookie or per dozen basis or, since some of it involves chocolate, we would weigh it and charge per ounce.

HTH

Paul & Peter

Bethkay Posted 6 Nov 2008 , 1:50am
post #3 of 7

I agree with Paul & Peter on the price. I sell my biscotti per piece--just like a cookie. As for the packaging, I would try to find out what she is usisng them for--her family, gifts, or for a party? If they are just for her family, or she already has a tray for service, a small cake box should suffice. I always ask customers if they need a tray. I keep a stash of them around and add the cost of them to the final bill. If she wants to package a few of them for gifts, you can purchase cello bags in a variety of sizes and tie them up with bow or the colorful twist ties that are available. Hope these suggestions are helpful. icon_smile.gif

chutzpah Posted 6 Nov 2008 , 5:29am
post #4 of 7

I make tons of biscotti for the shop, and for corporate orders. But I don't make those huge long ones as I think they are vulgar. I realize that biscotti size is an american-european difference. In all my travels I have never seen those huge ones except in the US, and a couple places in England.

My biscotti are 5-6 cm long and about 1½ cm high which I have found is the perfect size for my needs (and my clients' needs) and I sell them by weight. Corporations usually purchase several kilos at a time to have in the break room.

MichelleM77 Posted 6 Nov 2008 , 12:08pm
post #5 of 7

That is good to know! I was worried my biscotti weren't big enough. icon_smile.gif

I don't have a retail location, so I sell by what a batch makes (I think it's about two dozen), so that's how I charge. Off the top of my head I think it's $10/dozen.

I bought one (a long one too!) at a local coffee chain and it was nasty and expensive, about $2. I had to try it just to compare it to mine. I get looks when I say $10/dozen, but you can buy 1 for $2 at the coffee shop?!?!?

It's like anything else really....research your area, figure your ingredients, and pick a price.

southerncake Posted 6 Nov 2008 , 3:15pm
post #6 of 7

I think $10/dozen is very reasonable! They are so expensive at the coffee shop.

Do any of you have a fabulous basic biscotti recipe you would mind sharing? I want to do just a very basic recipe and offer it plain and dipped in chocolate, but I am having a hard time finding a recipe that I like!

missmeg Posted 6 Nov 2008 , 3:27pm
post #7 of 7

Thanks for the tip on the size, chutzpah :thumbsup:. I'll keep that in mind as I bake this year.

I think I'm going to charge $14/dozen for them; the truffles I already sell at $25/dozen.

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