mamacc Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 1:39am
post #1 of

I just tried the dark chocolate mudcake recipe (Nati's) and it is so YUMMY! It's like a cross between a brownie and a flourless chocolate cake. Can't go wrong there! Anyway, thanks for posting that recipe Nati! The best part is that I actually get to eat this cake since it's for my daughter's first birthday, this Sunday. I'm definitely going to have to try the white chocolate mudcake sometime soon.

So far I've torted the cake and filled with a chocolate BC, and pink BC for the rest. That's as far as I've got with the design. icon_confused.gif I'm procrastinating big time! I feel like I have to do some kind of decorated cake since it's her first birthday, but I'm still tired from December's cakes!! icon_cry.gif I see so many really nice 1st birthday cakes on CC! I might play around with some leftover white modeling chocolate....

Courtney

35 replies
socake Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 6:33am
post #2 of

I love chocolate mudcake! It is so good for carving to make novelty cakes as well. Almost all of my cakes are chocolate mud!

Luby Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 1:59pm
post #3 of

I tried to "search" for this recipe, but can't seem to find it. Can someone please post a link or the recipe?

Thanks so much!
icon_smile.gif

tbittner Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 2:13pm
post #4 of

I believe this might be the recipe, it is the newest! I cannot wait tto try it!

http://cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-2417-22-Chocolate-mud-cake.html
Tracy

boonenati Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 2:16pm
post #5 of

Hi Ladies
I just wanted to point out that ALL the mudcake recipes i've posted should be baked at 160 degrees celcius NOT 180 like stated in the recipes. I only realised my mistake after the recipe was posted and for the time being it can't be fixed.
Enjoy : )
Nati
PS: The temperature for my other recipes are right icon_smile.gif

mamacc Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 2:18pm
post #6 of

Actually, that recipe is a different version than the one I tried. It's under Australian and New Zealand cakes. I'm sure that one's good too though!

Here's the dark chocolate mudcake recipe from Nati:
http://www.cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-2107-4-Dark-Chocolate-Mudcake.html

-C

tbittner Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 2:22pm
post #7 of

Thank you for posting the correct one! I hope to try them both nowicon_smile.gif
Tracy

boonenati Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 2:23pm
post #8 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamacc

Actually, that recipe is a different version than the one I tried. It's under Australian and New Zealand cakes. I'm sure that one's good too though!

Here's the dark chocolate mudcake recipe from Nati:
http://www.cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-2107-4-Dark-Chocolate-Mudcake.html



aaaaaaaah
I didn't even realise the first recipe wasnt mine icon_wink.gif
cheers
Nati
PS: Tis late and i should be in bed sleeping

CarolAnn Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 2:43pm
post #9 of

Nati, these recipes sound wonderful! I'm going to try the chocolate mud cake soon but have to convert from gms measurments. And I just checked and my new oven thermometer doesn't show celcius like my old one did. I hope there's a conversion chart here somewhere.

boonenati Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 2:49pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolAnn

Nati, these recipes sound wonderful! I'm going to try the chocolate mud cake soon but have to convert from gms measurments. And I just checked and my new oven thermometer doesn't show celcius like my old one did. I hope there's a conversion chart here somewhere.



Carol
According to my converter 160c is 320F
Does that sound right?
cheers
Nati

JaneK Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 2:51pm

Hey CarolAnn!!!..haven't seen you for a while..HNY!!

conversion in temp from the back of Toba's new book

162.79C = 325F

So it seems you would cook these cakes at just below 325...the next temp up or down is too far away..I think it would be fine at 325!!

edited to say: I think most NA ovens are only marked at 300, 325, 350 etc...maybe the new ones can be set to a more precise temp(I have an older oven)..if you can, set it to what Nati posted, 325 is closest of the std temps
Hope that helps
Jane

cindy6250 Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 2:52pm

Nati--That is what I got also.

Carolann---Here is a link to a conversion website.
I saved it to my favorites.

http://www.convert-me.com/en/convert/cooking

Cindy

Luby Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 2:58pm

A great big thanks to everyone for the links & info icon_smile.gif

zoraya Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 3:07pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamacc

Actually, that recipe is a different version than the one I tried. It's under Australian and New Zealand cakes. I'm sure that one's good too though!

Here's the dark chocolate mudcake recipe from Nati:
http://www.cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-2107-4-Dark-Chocolate-Mudcake.html

-C




ummm, I just went to this link and really want to try this recipe - it sounds so good. But would anyone be willing to convert it to simple english for me? I can do the measurement conversions but what is castor sugar, chocolate buttons and self raising flour? icon_eek.gif Maybe dumb questions but I'm just not getting it... icon_redface.gif

boonenati Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 3:12pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoraya

Quote:
Originally Posted by mamacc

Actually, that recipe is a different version than the one I tried. It's under Australian and New Zealand cakes. I'm sure that one's good too though!

Here's the dark chocolate mudcake recipe from Nati:
http://www.cakecentral.com/cake_recipe-2107-4-Dark-Chocolate-Mudcake.html

-C



ummm, I just went to this link and really want to try this recipe - it sounds so good. But would anyone be willing to convert it to simple english for me? I can do the measurement conversions but what is castor sugar, chocolate buttons and self raising flour? icon_eek.gif Maybe dumb questions but I'm just not getting it... icon_redface.gif



Castor sugar - Superfine sugar, just like regular but the granules are very very fine, so it melts quicker, if you're weighing your ingredients regular granulated sugar is fine.
Chocolate buttons - I think you guys call them choc melts?? I use Callebaut brand
Self Raising Flour - Flour that comes with raising agent included

cheers
Nati

zoraya Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 4:39pm

Thank you! thumbs_up.gif

Tkeys Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 6:18pm

Okay - I just did the conversions, but I haven't baked it yet. Here is what I have . . . . I'm thinking of trying this next week sometime:

150gms (5.25 ozs) dark chocolate buttons
250gms (1.09 cups, 17.5 tbs) butter
1 cup of milk
440gms (15.4 ozs, almost 2 cups) castor (superfine) sugar
2 extra large eggs
4tbs whiskey
80gms (about 1/3 cup +) self raising flour
120gms (about ½ cup -) plain flour
100gms (7 tbs) unsweetened cocoa

320 degrees Fahrenheit

NOTE ABOUT BUTTER: Butter in the UK/Australia weighs differently than in the US, so 250 grams of butter in the UK is just over 14 tbs, but 250 grams of butter in the US is 17.5 tbs. It has something to do with the difference in the fat content. So, I'm thinking that I'll probably just use 2 sticks of butter (16 tbs) and split the difference. I don't want to end up with a really greasy cake because I've used 3.5 extra tablespoons just because it weighed more. Just a few thoughts to think about! If someone has a chance to bake it first using the conversions, let me know. I was thinking of actually weighing in grams and then comparing in the measuring cups to make sure the online conversions were really accurate . . . but who knows if I would actually end up having the patience for that when baking day comes along.

nefgaby Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 6:41pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by boonenati

Castor sugar - Superfine sugar, just like regular but the granules are very very fine, so it melts quicker, if you're weighing your ingredients regular granulated sugar is fine.
Chocolate buttons - I think you guys call them choc melts?? I use Callebaut brand
Self Raising Flour - Flour that comes with raising agent included

cheers
Nati




So just to make sure, we are not talking Confectioners Sugar here, right? Since CS is super refined sugar...
Can I use regular sugar, you know, the stuff you add to your coffee?
icon_confused.gif
I'm sorry if this sounds dumb but would hate to mess it up... icon_rolleyes.gif

Tkeys Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 6:48pm

nefgaby - I've seen superfine sugar here in the stores - it is different than powdered sugar - basically, it is kind of like popcorn salt v. regular salt - just imagine sugar stuck in the blender to make a finer granule. In my grocery store, it comes in a box (Domino produces it), and it is right next to the regular sugar. It just says "superfine" or "extra fine" I believe on the box. I've never seen it as castor sugar here in the grocery store, but that doesn't mean it wouldn't be called that in baking supply shops. It is still a granulated sugar, and you could substitute regular sugar if you weigh it instead of using a measuring cup. (Once you weigh out 15.4 ozs, or the grams required, you could put that into measuring cups, and see how much sugar it measures out to be, and then use the measurements by cups in the future). Hope that helps!

nefgaby Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 6:51pm

Thanks Tkeys, that helps a LOT!! I will look for it next time I go grocery shopping! I really appreciate it.

JoanneK Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 6:56pm

Can you use something other then the whiskey in this?

Tkeys Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 7:18pm

Nefgaby . . . I just looked at a few of the other websites posted for conversion, then just measured the flour out . . . I'm not sure the conversions I used for flour were right (I used a straight converter online for dry ingredients). I think one of the links JanH gave in the other forum is more accurate (the Allrecipe converter) and I think 2/3 c for the self-rising flour and 1 cup regular flour might be more accurate, but I'm not 100% certain. I haven't tested the cocoa yet . . . the same website says 7/8 of a cup, but i think that sounds like a lot of cocoa. I happen to be baking another cake right now, so since I had the flour out, I just threw it on the scale out of curiosity.

Tkeys Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 7:21pm

One more thing . . . in looking at the web sites, it seems that 1 cup in australia is different than 1 cup here in the US . . . so i'm thinking that 1 cup of milk is also not the same (which I originally didn't think about). I think it is actually more, but I'm not sure. Allrecipes has conversion from US to Australia measurements, and 1 cup us, equals 3/4 cup plus a little bit Australia, so 1 cup australia must be closer to 1 1/4 cups . . . but I haven't found an exact converter yet. I'm working on it - I see baking this cake and making it taste good as a challenge now!

JanH Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 7:37pm

I really want to try the AU, NZ and UK recipes, but converting the cups and measuring spoon sizes has been difficult....

So I decided it would be easier just to buy metric measuring cups and spoons.

Here's what I found:

www.etacuisenaire.com

(Seems they sell to schools)

Metric Measuring Spoons:

http://www.etacuisenaire.com/catalog/product?deptId=MEASUREMENTMATERIALS&prodId=599&cs=598

Metric Measuring Cups:

http://www.etacuisenaire.com/catalog/product?deptId=&prodId=598&q=metric+measuring+cup

I posted to the CC store thread that I thought it would be useful to have these available, but nothing so far....

HTH

Tkeys Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 7:46pm

Okay - just found out that 1 cup in Australia is 250 ml . . . on a standard liquid measuring cup that we use, the ml are usually marked all the way up to 250. Hope that helps! Our cups are about 240ml . . . so it isn't a huge difference.

JanH Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 7:53pm

Recipe Equivalents:

British:

www.cooksrecipes.com/tips/brit.....ments.html

http://allrecipes.com/HowTo/Co.....etail.aspx

Australian:

http://allrecipes.com/HowTo/Co.....etail.aspx

US to Metric:

http://allrecipes.com/HowTo/Co.....etail.aspx

Cups to Grams:

http://allrecipes.com/HowTo/Co.....etail.aspx

www.faqs.org/faqs/cooking/faq/

Temperature Conversions:

http://allrecipes.com/HowTo/Ga.....etail.aspx

http://allrecipes.com/HowTo/Te.....etail.aspx

Cake Pans:

http://allrecipes.com/HowTo/Ca.....etail.aspx

FYI: Metric Measuring Cup/Spoons:

Australian cup = 250 ml
tablespoon = 20 ml
teaspoon = 5 ml

New Zealand cup = 250 ml
tablespoon = 15 ml
teaspoon = 5 ml

The NZ standard size tablespoon is 15 ml which is different from the Australian tablespoon (20 ml).

jsmith Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 7:56pm

I also would like to know what can be substituted for the whiskey.

Tkeys Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 8:03pm

Thanks JanH! You are amazing with the information! You should post some pictures (actually, I think all you need is one posted) so we can nominate you for the member spotlight! You are always such a help in responding to these posts with all of your links . . . you are better than a search engine or than any librarian I've ever met!

JanH Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 8:04pm

Here's a list of Alcohol Substitutes for Recipes:

www.cooksrecipes.com/tips/alcohol-substitutes.html

For whiskey, see Bourbon.

(Would help if I could type today.)

HTH

csera Posted 13 Jan 2007 , 8:06pm

Hi,
I have mud cake a few times (although not the CC recipe) and have found that you can substitute Kahlua, Brandy, or Rum for the whiskey.

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