Rolled Buttercream Problems

Decorating By tinas-treats Updated 16 Sep 2008 , 5:44pm by marccrand

tinas-treats Posted 16 Sep 2008 , 2:28am
post #1 of 6

I just tried rolled butercream for the first time on cookies. I used the "no fail sugar cookies" recipe and it was awesome and the the rolled buttercream to put on top. Well, not only was it really hard to roll out (it was sticking even after I added more powdered sugar), but then I couldn't pick it up icon_cry.gif (even though I rolled it on parchment to attempt to flip it over on my hand), and it stretched really bad and distorted it. tapedshut.gif Plus, how thin are you supposed to roll it? Some I rolled too thick and some I rolled to thin- whats a good amount? Since it was my first time, I'm sure it will get easier thumbs_up.gif , but if I had some tips maybe I could do much better next time. Thank you

5 replies
just_for_fun Posted 16 Sep 2008 , 2:37am
post #2 of 6

i tried rolled buttercream once for a cake and I found it too greasy, I couldn't roll it out easily and then to get it on the cake -GRRR! Still have to get the guts to try again. I hope someone can help you, maybe they'll help me too!!

confectioneista Posted 16 Sep 2008 , 2:58am
post #3 of 6

If the rolled buttercream recipe you used is the one I'm thinking of, I didn't like it either. Had the same issues you both described.

I would suggest either doing thinned RI or fondant on the cookies. I like to do mine with fondant that I make myself. Generally for cakes you would roll the fondant out to about 1/4" thickness. But if you're doing cookies, I've done mine thinner than that - more like 1/8" thickness. And I don't have trouble with it adhering to the cookies either. I just use my cookie cutter on the fondant so it comes out perfectly in the same shap as the cookies - no distortion.

HTH

PJ37 Posted 16 Sep 2008 , 3:06am
post #4 of 6

RBC IS hard to work with until you get used to it. I find that warm hands don't work well with it...so I avoid touching it! Here's what works for me...some are my own ideas, some I have learned from this forum.

About 24 hours prior to cookie baking, I make the RBC. After kneading, take a small amount and place it between a gallon sized ziplock bag (or the like). Cut the sides open so you can flip up one side after you roll it out. I usually roll it slightly less than 1/8 inch. Then cut out your patterns on the bottom half of the ziplock. Then take the plastic ziplock and flip the plastic over and put the cut outs in a large sheet cake pan (11x15 or so). If you have these lined with waxed paper, the cut outs come right off on the paper. I just keep layering these (on wax paper), until everything is cut out. Then I place these in the freezer.

After baking and very slightly cooling the cookie, I just place the frozen cut out on the cookie. (If you place it on too soon, it really does get greasy...if it is warm it works well!

Hope this helps! I really like the taste and texture of the RBC on the NFSC and everyone I've made them for loves them!

On

BlakesCakes Posted 16 Sep 2008 , 3:16am
post #5 of 6

I roll out the RBC between 2 sheets of parchment paper. I put the rolled out sheet of RBC (still on a sheet of parchment) into the freezer for a few minutes, take it out, cut out the shapes, and remove the excess. If the cookies are ready (warm, but not hot), I put the shape right on. If the cookies aren't ready, I put the shapes back in the fridge until the cookies are the right temp. Works very well for me.

HTH
Rae

marccrand Posted 16 Sep 2008 , 5:44pm
post #6 of 6

I've only used RBC twice for cookies and had a horrible time of it for the reasons you mentioned. It did get better as the day went on and I was playing around and learned a few things. Keeping it cold is a huge factor!

It doesn't dry quite as hard as Antonia74 so I didn't stack more than 2 high (good thing it wasn't a huge order) but man-o-man, talk about decadant!! When I get time I need to experiment some more because they were so good I want to use it again.

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