Trying To Figure Out Costs, Profit..couple ??'s

Business By sweetcravings Updated 29 Aug 2008 , 2:51am by cakefanatic

sweetcravings Posted 23 Aug 2008 , 7:02pm
post #1 of 30

Ok so i've really been hesitating selling my stuff up till now, but feel that the demand and possiblity are too hard to resist. I've sat down and figured out what the cost is per cookie, cannoli recipe, how long it takes for alot of my stuff. Now for marking up the product so that i make some money icon_confused.gif Do you include your wage per hour as part of the profit you make when you are making it all by yourself (no employees)? I'm sorry if it 's a silly question. My DH seems to think you shouldn't include your wage as profit, you should consider yourself an employee. So when looking at profit you should only look at the money you make on the markup of ingredients. Am i confusing you??? Example...For two dozen cannoli

whipped filling cost...6.09
2 boxes of pastry.....7.18
2 boxes of pudding..2.40
Total time 75min @ .25c/min...18.75
Oven time.............. .25c
box......................3.00

total............37.67
30%markup..11.30

total cost to customer...48.97

PROFIT..30.00 (this is the markup and my wage added)
My DH feels that you should only consider the 11.00 as profit. What is your opinion on this? Is 30%markup too high/too little. I'm thinking 2.00 is expensive per cannoli. I just don't know how to figure it all out.

We've purchased a small business book but there is sooo much to learn. The money part has got my mind spinning.
I haven't even figured out cakes yet..there are so many variables. I tried calling and asking around and the bakeries around are soooo private about their costs and wouldn't give me nothing upfront as far as their prices on stacked cakes etc. They all say make an appt to discuss it. I don't want to 'pretend' to be a bride all over town. I feel it's dishonest and frankly i don't think i could lie that well.
Cannolis in my area cost anywhere between...1.10 -2.00 peice. After taste testing many I believe mine are best by far, and people have said this as well.
Honestly the money part of this is enough for me to go crazy. I really do think it's a large part of why i haven't 'sold' my stuff. It's all so confusing. Like i said, i haven't even gotten to the cake stuff and already i am feeling overwhelmed. How does one figure out exactly how much icing is on a cake???doens't it vary from time to time? Different fillings, time... icon_cry.gif
Ya know my father started a business and he started with next to nothing. I was never really curious about business so i never sat down and asked all these types of questions while he was alive. icon_cry.gif Now that he is gone i realize i have not only lost a wonderful dad but also a valuable resource on how to start a business and run it effectively. I guess for now i will just have to rely on books and all of you for help in this matter.

suz

Edit to change the amount from one dozen - 2..;0) Typo the first time i posted.

29 replies
Mike1394 Posted 23 Aug 2008 , 7:26pm
post #2 of 30

I know I'm going to get it for this BUT. I never understood the idea of paying yourself an hourly wage. Do you think Bill Gates gets paid per hour? Now before everyone jumps, here's why. How do you know someone is willing to pay you that amount? You are always worth more than someone is willing to pay. Remember you are no longer an employee. This is a very hard thing to forget. It doesn't matter to your customer if it takes you five minutes to do a cake, or five hours.

Whenever I figure a price it's through what competition charges, my ability, what the market will bare, and cost of a certain item. I have a basic idea of how much profit I need to make on a certain item. The minimum profit after cost is 100% that is the very bare bones minimum.

Mike

sweetcravings Posted 23 Aug 2008 , 10:00pm
post #3 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike1394

I know I'm going to get it for this BUT. I never understood the idea of paying yourself an hourly wage. Do you think Bill Gates gets paid per hour?




I totally get your point on this one. i guess that's why when my DH said dont count your hourly wage as a profit I was kinda confused... icon_confused.gif I thought the same as you. I'm not an employee, i'm the boss. Even if i have to do the work essentially it's money in my pocket wether i want to call it my hourly wage or profit doesn't matter. When he said that ultimately i would make 11.00 on that order I kinda said, 'what, that doesnt' sound right." icon_confused.gif
I can't wait to get more feedback and opinions on this one. Thanks for your advise. Any help i can get understanding everything is so much appreciated.
Suzanne

Gingoodies Posted 23 Aug 2008 , 10:17pm
post #4 of 30

I am not sure I am seeing this correctly.. You are costing out 1 dozen cannoli and you come up with a figure of $48.97... that equals out to $4 per cannoli, not $2

liapsim Posted 23 Aug 2008 , 10:19pm
post #5 of 30

I'm with Mike on that one. Maybe once you get on your feet and know how much you make as profit a week on average...then you can cut yourself a check every week....and keep the rest of the profit for your company.

$2.00 doesn't sound high at all for a cannoli to me. I live in Georgia and they run about $2-$2.50 a piece here. I would pay it and I have paid it.

Good luck with everything and I hope you get on your feet quickly!

sweetcravings Posted 23 Aug 2008 , 10:57pm
post #6 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gingoodies

I am not sure I am seeing this correctly.. You are costing out 1 dozen cannoli and you come up with a figure of $48.97... that equals out to $4 per cannoli, not $2




That's the cost for two dozen cannolis. I was wondering if i should just set a two dozen minimum on them...they aren't all that big. I'm not sure if it will shy away people from ordering. In my family that will go in no time. icon_biggrin.gif

sweetcravings Posted 23 Aug 2008 , 11:08pm
post #7 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by liapsim

I'm with Mike on that one. Maybe once you get on your feet and know how much you make as profit a week on average...then you can cut yourself a check every week....and keep the rest of the profit for your company.

$2.00 doesn't sound high at all for a cannoli to me. I live in Georgia and they run about $2-$2.50 a piece here. I would pay it and I have paid it.

Good luck with everything and I hope you get on your feet quickly!




On Thurs i went all around town pricing and i only saw one place that had them on for 2.00 CAN a peice. It was a pathetic looking cannoli too. thumbsdown.gif I didnt' even want to spend the money to taste test it. Honestly, and i'm not just bragging but every single person who has tried my cannolis go on and on about them and these are some of the biggest italian critics. It's my filling they love. It's not all that compllicated..just white choco mousse but people go nutty over it. I want to guard it like a golden secret but eventually i will have to tell someone if they ask about the ingredients due to allergies or something. One of the most popular bakeries in town has cannolis but when we tried it, the filling was gross. This is probably what others have experienced when they've eaten it to. I figure if i can get the word out they could be a huge seller for me.
I would love to get 2.50 per cannoli but i wonder if people would pay it. You say you've paid it, so maybe i have a chance. Should i just price them at 2.00 and see what happens? If they don't balk at the cost increase it promptly. I'm sooooo new to this. icon_smile.gif
Thanks for all your input.

indydebi Posted 23 Aug 2008 , 11:09pm
post #8 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike1394

I never understood the idea of paying yourself an hourly wage. Do you think Bill Gates gets paid per hour?




This can be a confusing issue, especially if you are talking a one-man-show vs. a company or a corporation.

No, Bill Gates doesnt' get paid by the hour. But he does get a paycheck like everyone else, be it a salary per day, per week, per month, whatever. He can't just pull money out of the company coffer whenever he wants. His salary is part of the company expense and whatever is leftover is company profit. Being the major stockholder, he reaps the benefit of those profits.

If you are ready to start thinking like a business, then you have to always consider "what if I had to pay someone to do this"? If you are doing the work, then you need to look at yourself as "hired help" and you are part of the cost of making that item. So you should count "payroll" ... be it yours or someone you hire ..... as part of the expenses before you can call it profit.

It differs from a sole proprietor vs. LLC vs. "S" corp, etal, but writing yourself a paycheck can make a difference on the taxes you pay personally and thru the business.

Sometimes this whole thing is transparent if you are doing this as a hobby or even as a sole proprietor. But when you start moving toward a business, then you need to think and function like a business.

Gingoodies Posted 23 Aug 2008 , 11:19pm
post #9 of 30

Sweetcravings, the pricing makes much more sense now. $2 per cannoli is not an outrageous price at all. thumbs_up.gif Great minds think alike though, I have been mixing white chocolate mousse with my ricotta to make my cannoli filling for a long time now. It is so creamy and yummy. I even passed this recipe on to a "pastry chef" and she loved it. Says she will use it all the time now. Good luck with your venture. I hope it all works out for you!

sweetcravings Posted 23 Aug 2008 , 11:28pm
post #10 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gingoodies

Sweetcravings, the pricing makes much more sense now. $2 per cannoli is not an outrageous price at all. thumbs_up.gif Great minds think alike though, I have been mixing white chocolate mousse with my ricotta to make my cannoli filling for a long time now. It is so creamy and yummy. I even passed this recipe on to a "pastry chef" and she loved it. Says she will use it all the time now. Good luck with your venture. I hope it all works out for you!




Sorry about the confusion.

Ohhh i've never put ricotta with it..just the mousse. That sounds wonderful too. icon_biggrin.gifthumbs_up.gif
It's so funny how something so basic is sooo popular. I can't get the mix in our city so i have to cross the border to get it. I always stock up when i go. For some reason you can only get the sugarfree/fatfree version here. Good for me i guess. It's my(our) little secret for now. icon_smile.gif

suzanne

Mike1394 Posted 24 Aug 2008 , 1:29pm
post #11 of 30

More on the hourly thing. This doesn't mean your not going to get paid. You have to figure in some sort of salary. OR. Take loans from your company at the beginning. Pay them back with interest. This will build fast.

One other thing, equipment. Set up a separate leasing company. Heaven forbid something happens, but this is a lil umbrella. Your decorating company actually ends up leasing the equip from your leasing company. If things don't work out, or you get sued you won't lose everything. Nobody ever wants to hear that something bad could happen. This is a very hard business to compete in, and actually make $$$. There has to be a contingent plan to fall back on

Mike

PinkZiab Posted 24 Aug 2008 , 6:42pm
post #12 of 30

[quoteOhhh i've never put ricotta with it..just the mousse.[/quote]

Totally outside the point of this post, but how can you really call it a cannolli without ricotta? lol Guess I'm just a purist for some things lol.

KoryAK Posted 24 Aug 2008 , 6:54pm
post #13 of 30

And darling, who told you to mark your costs up 30%... I think the canned answer is usually 3x cost. It will be hard to get that price tho when your cost is so high from buying everything retail. Can you look into bulk options for at least the items that don't expire?

sweetcravings Posted 24 Aug 2008 , 9:38pm
post #14 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by KoryAK

And darling, who told you to mark your costs up 30%... I think the canned answer is usually 3x cost. It will be hard to get that price tho when your cost is so high from buying everything retail. Can you look into bulk options for at least the items that don't expire?




Dh told me to put it up to 30%, that's what they do at his workplace..not bakery but tool and mold icon_smile.gif Like apple and oranges i know. icon_biggrin.gif
I have heard of the 3x the costs so i will try and figure that out as well. We were just discussing tonight about possibly getting the pastry in bulk quantity and we can just keep it frozen till needed, as well as the pudding etc.. So much to think about..my head is spinning. I don't want to undercharge..i keep saying to myself, "i will not undersell myself", i've done that before on my cake and i felt horrible afterwards.

sweetcravings Posted 24 Aug 2008 , 9:41pm
post #15 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkZiab

[quoteOhhh i've never put ricotta with it..just the mousse.




Totally outside the point of this post, but how can you really call it a cannolli without ricotta? lol Guess I'm just a purist for some things lol.[/quote]

I know..most Italians will agree with you on that. icon_biggrin.gif In my family and those around me i think the most popular is either sweetened whip cream or mousse. I only know one person who likes the lemon filled ones.yuck.
I personally find the ricotta too heavy and rich for a dessert. Somehow i feel less guilty eating the whipped cream ones, they taste so light. icon_lol.gif I try not to think about all the butter in that pastry. icon_smile.gif

margaretb Posted 25 Aug 2008 , 8:39am
post #16 of 30

I think I would price the canollis at the 2.50 to start, and if you really can't sell them, then you could lower the price. I think it might be offputting to your customers to have the price raised immediately -- why does the same canolli suddenly cost more? Whatever price they see as the first price is going to be the anchor in their head, so they will always see $2 as the normal price, and if you raise it, they will see it as being above the normal price. If you want a lower price to reel in some customers, then you price it as $2.50 but you offer a special like the first ten orders receive a 20% discount (which would make the canollis $2).

I think you are overly stressed about whether your profit includes your wage or not. Seems to me that only matters to the accountant if it makes a difference in how you are taxed. I would think your concern is to make sure that you are not working for free, and also to have a reasonable way to set prices. Well, if you want to set a wage amount plus a profit, nothing wrong with that. If you choose to go by a per item price at what you see as the market rate or just set some amount times cost, also fine, but obviously you will figure out what that means to you as an hourly wage to make sure it is worth your time. I have noticed that the professional decorators on this site usually charge a per slice price. I suspect you will find that pricing is something of an art, and you will probably want to use cost plus wage as your minimum price to see whether it is worth doing, and then see how much higher you can go.

Good luck.

sweetcravings Posted 25 Aug 2008 , 12:01pm
post #17 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by margaretb

I think I would price the canollis at the 2.50 to start, and if you really can't sell them, then you could lower the price. I think it might be offputting to your customers to have the price raised immediately -- why does the same canolli suddenly cost more? Whatever price they see as the first price is going to be the anchor in their head, so they will always see $2 as the normal price, and if you raise it, they will see it as being above the normal price. If you want a lower price to reel in some customers, then you price it as $2.50 but you offer a special like the first ten orders receive a 20% discount (which would make the canollis $2).

I think you are overly stressed about whether your profit includes your wage or not. Seems to me that only matters to the accountant if it makes a difference in how you are taxed. I would think your concern is to make sure that you are not working for free, and also to have a reasonable way to set prices. Well, if you want to set a wage amount plus a profit, nothing wrong with that. If you choose to go by a per item price at what you see as the market rate or just set some amount times cost, also fine, but obviously you will figure out what that means to you as an hourly wage to make sure it is worth your time. I have noticed that the professional decorators on this site usually charge a per slice price. I suspect you will find that pricing is something of an art, and you will probably want to use cost plus wage as your minimum price to see whether it is worth doing, and then see how much higher you can go.

Good luck.




Thanks so much for your input. You make some valid points. I guess that is why i am thinking overly hard on this. I dont' want to price too low and then kick myself and have people complain when i raise it. I want to avoid that problem all together. $2.50 sounds wonderful for a price, i would love to charge that BUT i just don't think people would pay it in our area. I mean i visited 6bakeries in my area and surrounding and the cost per cannoli my size is anywhere from $.85 - 2.00. The average price was around a 1.50. I think the $2.50 would scare them off. Don't you? I was thinking more like $2.00/cannoli. WHere abouts do you live. What do they range in your area?
I have to call my neighbour with a price today and i'm kinda nervous. I don't know what her reaction will be when i say $2.00/each..but if i could get enough courage 2.50 would sound even better in my wallet.
Thanks for your help.

margaretb Posted 25 Aug 2008 , 4:17pm
post #18 of 30

I live in a rural area in Alberta, and quite frankly the only thing I know about canollis is what got written in this thread plus I think they talk about them on everybody loves raymond. I thought they were those big round noodles stuffed with cheese! From this thread, the impression I get is that they are closer to being like an eclair or a longjohn donut stuffed with whipped cream. If it is that sort of dessert thing and they are sort of a handful size, then I don't think $2.50 is unreasonable IF yours are better than whatever else is available. Remember, you are not competing with the cheapest ones. You want to have people who will pay for the extra quality of your product. The people who are only concerned about cost can go to a grocery store where the product is made to be cheap. I read somewhere, I think on the Earlene's cakes website, that you should never price your cakes at less than what the local bakery charges because you are going after a different class of customer.

I bought some pyrogies (sort of a filled dumpling) from a lady around here and she charges at least twice what they would cost from the grocery store, and hers are smaller, but MAN OH MAN, they were delicious. I will order from her again because they are just so much better. I could, in theory, make them myself for cheaper BUT they are a pain to make (for me) and mine don't actually turn out all that well.

I think with the costs you listed, you will make nearly as much profit from selling two orders (4 dozen total) at 2.50 per canolli as you would make from selling three orders (6 dozen total) at 2.00 per canolli. So the question is, does the higher price drive away more than one third of the orders? If not, then go with the higher price and you will make the same profit (and I did it counting your wage as part of the profit) with less work. BTW, if you only look at the profit without your wage, then you make twice as much by charging 2.50.

Another thought is that if you start charging more now, you can wait longer before raising prices even if your costs go up.

Here's another thought if you can't quite bring yourself to charge 2.50 and if you don't have anyone whom you can ask for an honest opinion about whether there will be any demand for your canollis at 2.50 (and why can't you call someone in your family and ask them what they think of 2.50 as a price?). I said this before, but tell your neighbour that your price for canollis is GOING to be 2.50, but because you are just getting started, you will let her order for 2.00. Then see what she says. Does she order but say she won't be buying any when the price goes up? Does she order dozens extra (assuming they are freezable) to avoid the higher price? Does she say that sounds reasonable? You could even say that the 2.00 price is good for orders placed in the next 2 or 4 weeks. Does she call all her friends and tell them to order your awesome canollis right away (which would be great marketing wise, right?)? You can even say that you had a hard time working out a price for them, but really it's not worth your while to charge less than 2.50, and ask her what she thinks. If the choice is between 2 and 2.50, everyone will choose 2. If the choice is between 2.50 and no canollis, it's a different story.

I'm interested in hearing how she reacts to the price and whether she orders.

chutzpah Posted 25 Aug 2008 , 4:36pm
post #19 of 30

Aaaauuugghhh.

I can't keep my mouth shut any longer (or would that be.... I can't keep my fingers still any longer?).

Cannoli is spelled C A N N O L I. Only one *L*. A single pastry is called a 'cannolo', and the plural is then *cannoli*.

There is no apostrophe *S* when talking about plural ANYTHING!


That said, I can now let you get back to work.

sweetcravings Posted 25 Aug 2008 , 4:36pm
post #20 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by margaretb

I live in a rural area in Alberta, and quite frankly the only thing I know about canollis is what got written in this thread plus I think they talk about them on everybody loves raymond. I thought they were those big round noodles stuffed with cheese! From this thread, the impression I get is that they are closer to being like an eclair or a longjohn donut stuffed with whipped cream. If it is that sort of dessert thing and they are sort of a handful size, then I don't think $2.50 is unreasonable IF yours are better than whatever else is available. Remember, you are not competing with the cheapest ones. You want to have people who will pay for the extra quality of your product. The people who are only concerned about cost can go to a grocery store where the product is made to be cheap. I read somewhere, I think on the Earlene's cakes website, that you should never price your cakes at less than what the local bakery charges because you are going after a different class of customer.

I bought some pyrogies (sort of a filled dumpling) from a lady around here and she charges at least twice what they would cost from the grocery store, and hers are smaller, but MAN OH MAN, they were delicious. I will order from her again because they are just so much better. I could, in theory, make them myself for cheaper BUT they are a pain to make (for me) and mine don't actually turn out all that well.

I think with the costs you listed, you will make nearly as much profit from selling two orders (4 dozen total) at 2.50 per canolli as you would make from selling three orders (6 dozen total) at 2.00 per canolli. So the question is, does the higher price drive away more than one third of the orders? If not, then go with the higher price and you will make the same profit (and I did it counting your wage as part of the profit) with less work. BTW, if you only look at the profit without your wage, then you make twice as much by charging 2.50.

Another thought is that if you start charging more now, you can wait longer before raising prices even if your costs go up.

Here's another thought if you can't quite bring yourself to charge 2.50 and if you don't have anyone whom you can ask for an honest opinion about whether there will be any demand for your canollis at 2.50 (and why can't you call someone in your family and ask them what they think of 2.50 as a price?). I said this before, but tell your neighbour that your price for canollis is GOING to be 2.50, but because you are just getting started, you will let her order for 2.00. Then see what she says. Does she order but say she won't be buying any when the price goes up? Does she order dozens extra (assuming they are freezable) to avoid the higher price? Does she say that sounds reasonable? You could even say that the 2.00 price is good for orders placed in the next 2 or 4 weeks. Does she call all her friends and tell them to order your awesome canollis right away (which would be great marketing wise, right?)? You can even say that you had a hard time working out a price for them, but really it's not worth your while to charge less than 2.50, and ask her what she thinks. If the choice is between 2 and 2.50, everyone will choose 2. If the choice is between 2.50 and no canollis, it's a different story.

I'm interested in hearing how she reacts to the price and whether she orders.




Thanks so much for the wonderful response. Youve given me so much tot think about. I wish i read it before i called her.
She wasn't home when i called her but i left a message...25.oo for 1dozen....or.. 45 for two dozen. My husband seems to think no one will pay 2.50around here and i will scare of people. He also thought i should make it more appealing to buy more by giving the next dozen at a reduced rate.

My sister's reaction when i told her a bakery in town sold them for 2.oo a cannoli when i mentioned it yesterday was...wow! She thought that was high. My BIL said he would buy a 2.oo cannoli without hesitation but would make it more appealing by lowering costs the more you buy. Me on the other hand wanted to keep it 2.00/cannoli straight across the board regardless how much you buy but DH thought it was a bad idea.

I think i will take your idea of mentioning to the neighbour about the 2.50/can and see what her reaction will be when she calls. If she doesn't seem shocked at the price i may just up them in the future orders. She hasnt' yet called me back so i'll let you know what she said.

Suz

Jasmine33 Posted 25 Aug 2008 , 5:24pm
post #21 of 30

Don't listen to family. My aunt told me this one cake I made she thought it would be worth about $20.00 or so. The one in my avatar. Everyone at the party loved it and were sorry to hear I lived so far away cause they would want to order.

This was a 3 layer, 8 inch cake, special request order made from scratch with real butter, fresh strawberry's, canned pineapple and coconut, home made frosting etc. I spent about 2.5 ours from start to finish and the ingredients/box/board alone cost me $15.00!!

Some people just have no idea the care and hard work that is put into things. Thankfully my customers do. lol

Anyhow what places are you "competing" against? If yours are so much better it seems to me you should be able to charge more.

thumbs_up.gif

margaretb Posted 25 Aug 2008 , 7:04pm
post #22 of 30

Sorry about the misspelling. I thought I was probably going to misspell, but it sounded so sterile to keep saying "your product". Go ahead with the slap if I did the 's on any plurals. Yikes.

Re your brother paying $2 without hesitation -- I've noticed that about men in general. If they like it, they pay what seems to me to be a shocking price for anything domestic-like. So there you are, there's your ideal market, men, especially single ones who don't know how to cook!

Don't stress about your quote. At least you figured it out and you know you won't be working for free.

sweetcravings Posted 25 Aug 2008 , 7:11pm
post #23 of 30

Update...my neighbour called..ordered 2dozen cannoli 45.oo. SHe didn't even hesitate at the price. Now granted she has admittingly said, "i will pay top dollar for something i know is fabulous". She herself has a home business of making baskets so she knows how much work and time goes into these sorts of things. We started talking costs and i told her it was possible i would be raising this costs and she said, "ya know,you will have to see what people will pay. Some, like me will pay it no problem, others will say no way and go get it cheaper somewhere else. Some people just don't care about quality they are more concerned about price." So i think had i told her a higher price she probably would've payed it.
I guess time will tell if this is a reasonable price or not. There will be alot of people at the party so i'm sure the word will get out quickly.
Thanks to everyone for their help on the matter.

suz

cakequeen50 Posted 26 Aug 2008 , 5:12am
post #24 of 30

so why don't you split the difference and charge $2.25???

A little story....my BIL is very wealthy.....has been all his life. in his "world", his attitude is, if Mary is selling cannoli at $2.50 and Sue is selling cannoli at $2.00 ..Mary's must be better and he will buy Mary's. What is wrong with Sue's that she is only selling them for $2?

It took me a while to understand this as I have never been wealthy, but I am starting to see it with my clients. If they want Walmart cakes, they go to walmart. If they want "special" cakes, they come to me. If your cannolis (sorry Chutzpah) are as good as you say they are, you need to get the price for them.

Jasmine33 Posted 26 Aug 2008 , 5:53pm
post #25 of 30

I love that comment cakequeen!! That is everything in a nutshell!

indydebi Posted 26 Aug 2008 , 10:07pm
post #26 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakequeen50

so why don't you split the difference and charge $2.25???

A little story....my BIL is very wealthy.....has been all his life. in his "world", his attitude is, if Mary is selling cannoli at $2.50 and Sue is selling cannoli at $2.00 ..Mary's must be better and he will buy Mary's. What is wrong with Sue's that she is only selling them for $2?

It took me a while to understand this as I have never been wealthy, but I am starting to see it with my clients. If they want Walmart cakes, they go to walmart. If they want "special" cakes, they come to me. If your cannolis (sorry Chutzpah) are as good as you say they are, you need to get the price for them.




Many folks have this attitude. I have a photographer friend who lost a wedding because the groom said, "If he's only $6000 icon_eek.gif , then he must not be any good."

So my photog friend added a new level to his package pricing. He has very affordable packages ... and he added a $10,000 package. He told me, "I am NOT losing another wedding because someone thinks $6000 is too cheap!"

snarkybaker Posted 28 Aug 2008 , 12:56am
post #27 of 30

Are you sure you're making a cannolo :

Image

and not a Cream Horn


Image


Cream Horns are baked, Cannoli are fried. Cream Horns usually have whipped cream based mousse type fillings, Cannoli have cheese based fillings.

For what it's worth, we get $2.75 for a cannolo, and can't keep them in stock.

covered-in-sugar Posted 28 Aug 2008 , 1:25am
post #28 of 30

Well, at one of our favorite italian restaurants in TX, they charge about $6.00 for two cannolis! I pay that because they are yummy and they are a nice treat!

If people like them and want them, then they will pay what you are asking.


A cannolo sounds good... Yummy!

sweetcravings Posted 28 Aug 2008 , 8:49pm
post #29 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by txkat

Are you sure you're making a cannolo :

Image

and not a Cream Horn


Image


Cream Horns are baked, Cannoli are fried. Cream Horns usually have whipped cream based mousse type fillings, Cannoli have cheese based fillings.

For what it's worth, we get $2.75 for a cannolo, and can't keep them in stock.




Let me stand corrected...cream horn is what i am referring too. I do hope most understood that. In our area they are all called cannoli..even in our 'little italy'.

cakefanatic Posted 29 Aug 2008 , 2:51am
post #30 of 30

Here in Colorado they sell for $2.99 ea. at a local supermarket and they are selling. The price you have isn't bad at all. Can you share your secret ingredients? Thanks.. icon_lol.gif

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