Need To Get Dark Brown Royal Icing To Firm Up Hard!!!

Decorating By kimkake Updated 11 Aug 2008 , 11:59pm by KoryAK

kimkake Posted 9 Aug 2008 , 6:20pm
post #1 of 12

I just sent a cake out the door today with a dark brown royal icing chinese symbol standing on the top - but had to send 2 extras with her just in case one crumbled. I have a wedding coming up where the sides are covered in royal icing decals - and they are rather large - how do I get dark brown royal icing to firm up - it always seems the dark colors never harden enough. Is there a special brand of color or a trick to get the dark colors get firm???

11 replies
seagoat Posted 9 Aug 2008 , 6:32pm
post #2 of 12

how about adding tylose? Anyone heard of doing that? I know you can add it to fondant to make it hard. Tylose is also known as polident denture powder. Might try it out and see

Good luck

BlakesCakes Posted 9 Aug 2008 , 7:52pm
post #3 of 12

Crumbling can be a result of adding too much air to the royal. You want to mix it long & slow--by hand is the best, but it's a real test of endurance.

If you have access to Wilton Color Flow mix, I'd use that for things that require extra strength & size.

You can add gum arabic to your royal to make it stronger, too. This is done to strengthen royal for stringwork.

Adding liquid colors to royal can really mess with the texture. For dark colors like brown & black, try using powdered colors.

HTH
Rae

jules1719 Posted 9 Aug 2008 , 9:23pm
post #4 of 12

I seem to harp on this, but it's for good reason. Dark colors in any form (fondant, buttercream, g-paste, royal) are best when painted or airbrushed. Maybe I should say easiest?

While too much air or excessive grease can cause royal to crumble, I have noticed that some colors dry more easily than others. Reds and oranges and brown (which is dark orange) seem to be problematic. Get yourself a cheap airbrush and avoid the issue altogether. icon_biggrin.gif

Don't forget that paste colors contain glycerin... adding large amounts of color to royal means you are adding large amounts of glycerin.

BlakesCakes Posted 10 Aug 2008 , 1:47am
post #5 of 12

Well, airbrushes are great, but they're not for everyone or for every application. Good airbrushing is an art and bad airbrushing can ruin a lot of good work.

I wouldn't be inclined to pipe scrollwork or stringwork in white and then try to airbrush it black or brown. I'd want to start with the brown or black.

Sometimes, you just have to color the royal. Powdered colors will do the job without changing the consistency very much.

Rae

kimkake Posted 10 Aug 2008 , 8:17pm
post #6 of 12

Thanks so much - I'm going to search for powdered colors right now!!!

KoryAK Posted 10 Aug 2008 , 9:29pm
post #7 of 12

Tylose is my vote.

jules1719 Posted 11 Aug 2008 , 11:01am
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

Well, airbrushes are great, but they're not for everyone or for every application. Good airbrushing is an art and bad airbrushing can ruin a lot of good work.

I wouldn't be inclined to pipe scrollwork or stringwork in white and then try to airbrush it black or brown. I'd want to start with the brown or black.

Sometimes, you just have to color the royal. Powdered colors will do the job without changing the consistency very much.

Rae




There are drawbacks to using lots of gel color in royal. And powdered colors leave small spots of undissolved color throughout the royal. So, OBVIOUSLY, not every application is amenable to an airbrush nor is every application amenable to powdered colors or gel paste. DUH. SO without knowing the specific application, I offer this:

There are many, many ways around coloring royal at the start.

Depending on the application, use a crisco/10x frosting for piping fine designs. It can be colored black or brown by adding cocoa first, is heat stable, dries nice, and is easily piped into delicate designs. I question the use of royal icing for most designs.

Use your head, if the design is already on the cake, maybe an airbrush isn't the way to go. You needn't be an expert at anything but aiming to use an airbrush. And coloring large areas of cake or multiple applied pieces of royal icing a solid color is a no brainer. Black and brown stringwork excepted.

For most applications, in all but the fanciest and most delicate designs, you can still go back over royal icing with a paint brush, and many times this is still preferable to coloring the royal at the start. Black and brown stringwork excepted.

The point is many people obsess over problems such as these and sometimes you just need to change your technique.

stampinron Posted 11 Aug 2008 , 7:18pm
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by seagoat

Tylose is also known as polident denture powder. Might try it out and see




What? icon_eek.gif Like in the tooth paste isle?

BlakesCakes Posted 11 Aug 2008 , 10:43pm
post #10 of 12

I don't think tylose, or any other gum agent is the answer here. You add tylose, cmc, or gum-tex to fondant to make gum paste. It adds stretch and helps it to dry, but it's the stretch factor that is most important in that application.

Yes, I've too been told that tylose (or the generic of it, cmc --a methyl cellulose gum) is in denture powder fixatives. I've heard of people using it in a pinch. The powdered denture stuff is getting harder to find (I was looking in Wal-Mart a few days ago because I wanted to check the ingredients panel) and couldn't find any. Wilton's Gum-Tex would be my choice, if I needed cmc & didn't have tylose.

If you use powdered colors and find that it doesn't all dissolve to your liking, you can get a clean, unused nylon stocking, put about a cup of icing in it, twist it off, and force the icing thru (it will gather on the back of your hand) and then use it--works beautifully to take out any type of tiny clump.

See, I've used my brain icon_twisted.gif No DUHS, or airbrushin' about it!

HTH
Rae

playingwithsugar Posted 11 Aug 2008 , 10:51pm
post #11 of 12

Powdered colors work best if you sift them directly into your sugar before adding to your batter, icing, or sugarpaste.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

KoryAK Posted 11 Aug 2008 , 11:59pm
post #12 of 12

Tylose makes things dry faster and firmer, I believe its gum tragacanth that gives it more stretch (could be wrong). Faster and firmer is what she is looking for, tylose will work fine.

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