How Many Layers Of Filling?

Decorating By chelley325 Updated 21 Jun 2008 , 3:07am by terri-jo

chelley325 Posted 20 Jun 2008 , 9:36pm
post #1 of 16

I never thought about this until I saw a response below. I have just been making 2-layer cakes with 1 layer of filling in between. What is "standard"?

Sorry for all of the posts! Lots of questions over here icon_wink.gif

15 replies
indydebi Posted 20 Jun 2008 , 10:58pm
post #2 of 16

"standard" is whatever is normal for you and/or normal for your area.

I would consider a torted cake "above and beyond" normal. It's a beautiful look when cut and makes a cake look grand.

tirby Posted 20 Jun 2008 , 11:05pm
post #3 of 16

I agree 1 layer. But question indydebi, What would you charge if a bride did want the look? I HATE torting large cakes.

seagoat Posted 20 Jun 2008 , 11:17pm
post #4 of 16

I usually fill my cakes twice. But recently people have been complaining because the cake is too tall for the box.

I love "the look" when it's cut.

I think I'll have to start doing torted, filled once cakes...?

leah_s Posted 20 Jun 2008 , 11:18pm
post #5 of 16

I torte every cake that goes out my door. (four layers of cake, 3 layers of filling for each tier). It helps set me apart from bakeries around town.
Torting, even large tiers, is a snap with the Agbay.

dahir Posted 20 Jun 2008 , 11:21pm
post #6 of 16

What is a agbay?

terri-jo Posted 20 Jun 2008 , 11:25pm
post #7 of 16

I also torte my cake. Four layers of cake, three of filling. It really sets my cakes above a lot of other bakers in my area. I don't have an agbay yet, but I'm saving up my pennies, and it will be my next big purchase!! Go to the site and check out the video...its aaaaaamazing!

msulli10 Posted 20 Jun 2008 , 11:37pm
post #8 of 16

I torte my cakes as well and find that the filling doesn't bulge out the sides because the layers are lighter in weight. And, it does look impressive when you cut the cake.

sassycleo Posted 20 Jun 2008 , 11:38pm
post #9 of 16

When you torte since you have "extra" layers of filling do you use less filling on each vs on single filling layer?

If not how are you able to keep your cakes around the 4 in tall that is pretty much standard and how on earth do you do it with the SPS system?

indydebi Posted 20 Jun 2008 , 11:41pm
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by tirby

I agree 1 layer. But question indydebi, What would you charge if a bride did want the look? I HATE torting large cakes.




Right now, I will do it "upon request", but I don't get many (any) requests. But like leahs says, I realize it would set me apart and/or put me in the "upper" category of cake makers .... I'm considering making it standard for all my cakes.

sassycleo, yes I use less filling per layer and it's logical. With a 2-layer cake, you have 2" of cake, about 1/4" of filling, then 2" of cake. If you half the cakes, then you should half the filling..... 1" of cake, 1/8" of filling, 1" of cake, etc. Otherwise you have too much filling and you increase the chance of sliding. Plus you want to keep the cake-to-filling-taste proportionate.

terri-jo Posted 21 Jun 2008 , 12:20am
post #11 of 16

Yep, like debbie says, more layers, less filling. As well, I don't worry about a four inch cake. Mine end up being more like five inches, and I really like the look...quite impressive when it's all put together.

Narie Posted 21 Jun 2008 , 12:44am
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Quote:

Otherwise you have too much filling and you increase the chance of sliding.


Oh, so true. Do not get carried away with the filling when torting. Been there, done that. The cake slid apart when cut.

indydebi Posted 21 Jun 2008 , 12:55am
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by terri-jo

Yep, like debbie says, more layers, less filling. As well, I don't worry about a four inch cake. Mine end up being more like five inches, and I really like the look...quite impressive when it's all put together.




So true.

Ironically, I delivered a 12" torted cake today to an attorney's office for one of the partner's birthdays. I had taken some free cookies to them a few weeks ago. They called on Wed for this cake (needing a Friday noon delivery for this and the 10" german chocolate) and laughed that they were "testing" me with this cake. I told them the 12" cake would be $125 and she said, "ok.... and we also want ....." (heck, I should have just told them the full regular price instead of trying to schmooze 'em with this "tester" cake! icon_cry.gif ).

So I went "above and beyond" and torted it, with 2 layers of raspberry cream filling and one layer of choc-raspberry fudge filling. It BARELY fit in the 5" tall box!

Anyway .... the "ooh's!" and "ahhh's!" I got just from them looking in the box at this big 'ole honkin' cake was great for my ego!!

Hmmmm ..... I think I just talked myself into it. All cakes from this day forward will be torted!!!!! thumbs_up.gif

patrincia Posted 21 Jun 2008 , 12:57am
post #14 of 16

While we're on the subject of torting... what do you guys use to move large individual torted layers around? sometimes my cake layers stick to cardboards.

terri-jo Posted 21 Jun 2008 , 3:06am
post #15 of 16

I have several rim-less cookie sheets that I use to move the layers around. They're big enough, and knock wood, so far no sticking. As for cakes so tall they don't fit in the box...mine never do, especially with the tall decorations I tend to put on top. I close it as far as I can without damaging the cake, staple it, and cover the opening with plastic to keep out dust or rain.

terri-jo Posted 21 Jun 2008 , 3:07am
post #16 of 16

I have several rim-less cookie sheets that I use to move the layers around. They're big enough, and knock wood, so far no sticking. As for cakes so tall they don't fit in the box...mine never do, especially with the tall decorations I tend to put on top. I close it as far as I can without damaging the cake, staple it, and cover the opening with plastic to keep out dust or rain.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%