Using Potato Starch... (Cakelove)

Decorating By namaman Updated 28 Jun 2008 , 5:56am by bwonderful

namaman Posted 18 Jun 2008 , 2:29pm
post #1 of 9

Has anyone used this in their cakes? I just got Warren Brown's book, cakelove, and he swears by using this and a little less flour to get what he feels is a better texture / taste with his cakes. I am going to try to use it (once I can find it!!) to see how it works. But he uses it in everything from layer cakes to pound cakes to some of his icings.

I just was wondering if anyone else had tried it and what they thought about it...

8 replies
vww104 Posted 18 Jun 2008 , 4:11pm
post #2 of 9

I haven't tried this yet either but I did get Warren Brown's book and found it interesting. His recipes are definitely "off the beaten path" however I do want to try some of them if I can find potato starch and turbinado sugar.

LeanneW Posted 18 Jun 2008 , 4:51pm
post #3 of 9

how intersting.

I recently made a cake with potato starch but it was a vegan cake and the potato starch was a substitue for eggs.

the cake sucked and potato starch is definately not a good sub for eggs. I only used a TBSP or 2 mixed with some water.

What I used can be found in a Whole Foods or health food store. it is called "Ener-G Egg Replacer"

it is a small box though so if you are subbing flour you will probably need more. it should be enough for your test recipe though.

good luck and don't forget the eggs.

HerBoudoir Posted 18 Jun 2008 , 5:18pm
post #4 of 9

Bob's Red Mill line of whole grain "stuff" - flours, grains - has potato starch. Many supermarkets carry that line, as does Whole Foods.

Mike1394 Posted 18 Jun 2008 , 6:02pm
post #5 of 9

All it does is cut the protien content of the flour. So yes you will get a softer cake. I'm curious as to what kind of flour he was using to begin with. If your using a cake, or pastery flour with a low protien %, and then add the potato starch you might get to soft of cake. It will depend on what % of flour you use to begin with.

Mike

namaman Posted 18 Jun 2008 , 6:28pm
post #6 of 9

He uses unbleached, all-purpose flour for his cakes. He does not use the potato starch to replace the eggs, but instead, his theory is to cut down the amount of protein by using less flour with gluten and add more sugar.

Here is a link to a couple of his recipes:

http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/25142339/

I am going to head to Whole Foods to see if I can find some and give it a try...

Mike1394 Posted 18 Jun 2008 , 6:36pm
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by namaman

He uses unbleached, all-purpose flour for his cakes. He does not use the potato starch to replace the eggs, but instead, his theory is to cut down the amount of protein by using less flour with gluten and add more sugar.

Here is a link to a couple of his recipes:

http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/25142339/

I am going to head to Whole Foods to see if I can find some and give it a try...




I totally see cutting the AP flour. For someone that bakes very few cakes I would think it would be a viable option. This way you only have to buy AP flour. You can accomplish the same thing w/ corn starch. For someone that bakes a lot of cakes I think it would be a pain in the butt. Just get cake, or pastry flour, and not mix anything.

bevyd Posted 28 Jun 2008 , 1:12am
post #8 of 9

I have eaten cake from his bakery and I did not like it. According to the people who work there(Cakelove) you should let the cake come to room temp. and then eat it, because of the butter. Well I had it both ways cold and at room temp. I did not enjoy it either way, I have had better.But that's just my humble opinion.

bwonderful Posted 28 Jun 2008 , 5:56am
post #9 of 9

potato starch is a huge componet in gluten free baking. Just watch how much you use if you decide you want to try it. It's not a total replacement for flour.

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