Has Anyone Ever Used A Decorating Nail As A Heating Core?

Decorating By lauralee422 Updated 6 Apr 2008 , 3:40am by wendy1273

lauralee422 Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 12:37am
post #1 of 22

I'm just wondering if I should invest in buying one or just using my decorator nail (that is used for making roses)

21 replies
tracey1970 Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 12:41am
post #2 of 22

I use my flower nail(s) all the time. For smaller cakes, I use one, and for larger cakes (maybe 10" or larger), I use two or more. I've found them very helpful, in addition to the baking strips.

julesn20716 Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 12:47am
post #3 of 22

I use them too and they work perfectly.

CakesByLJ Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 12:48am
post #4 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by lauralee422

I'm just wondering if I should invest in buying one or just using my decorator nail (that is used for making roses)




Sure, use it all the time, successfully too..... icon_biggrin.gif

dawndelicious Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 12:49am
post #5 of 22

I was watching something on the internet and saw someone use a flower nail instead of a heating core. I thought, "It just can't be that easy", but, it is! The nails work wonderfully, and I haven't used my heating core since then. I had a flower nail, and then I bought another one at a craft store for less than $2. It was well worth the investment!

Hope it works for you!

Win Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 12:51am
post #6 of 22

I tried it for the first time this past weekend and it worked beautifully! Go for it!

GrandmaSweetiePie Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 12:50am
post #7 of 22

I also use the large nail for my cakes.

busymom9431 Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 12:52am
post #8 of 22

I use nails also and they work great! Give it a shot! thumbs_up.gif

MomMomX3 Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 12:56am
post #9 of 22

I made a large sheet cake and used 3 nails cake came out perfect.

mcook1670 Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 1:12am
post #10 of 22

I do it all the time.. they work great! The larger the cake the more nails i use and have had nothing but perfect results icon_biggrin.gif

HIPrincess Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 1:22am
post #11 of 22

Yes, I actually asked the same question a while back and got some wonderful information from this site. I have used rose nails for heating cores and they have worked quite well. I grease them well, put them in the pan with the round side facing the pan and then pour in the batter. For anything larger than an 8" cake I have used 1 if not 2 nails and in very, very large cakes, I have used 3. I do take them out of the baked cake as soon as I invert them so they don't stick. HTH. Good luck!

Ursula40 Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 1:27am
post #12 of 22

I use flower nails, the only thing I use the heating core for now is for baking the bottle necks for 3D bottles

lauralee422 Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 4:31pm
post #13 of 22

Thanks for all the great info- when u use more than one, do u put them right next to each other, or spread them out? Thanks again I so missed you all!

Win Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 6:22pm
post #14 of 22

I spaced mine evenly and it seemed to work perfectly. It just made sense to do it that way. HTH

Arriva Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 8:33pm
post #15 of 22

I put my homemade cake release all over the nail and it works like a charm. I bought a heating core -- used it once and put it in a drawer -- never to be used again!

lillielu Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 9:14pm
post #16 of 22

I was just wondering if when you use the flower nails if they tear the bottom of the cake,or leave holes?

Lillielu

tracey1970 Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 10:41pm
post #17 of 22

If the nail is well greased, it shouldn't pull out any cake. There will be a small hole from it, but nothing you won't cover with icing/fondant.

lillielu Posted 5 Apr 2008 , 12:30am
post #18 of 22

Thanks Tracey 1970! But I have one other question: If you put the nail in before you put in the batter, how do you tap the pan to get bubbles out? i know that maybe a silly question; but its one I don't know the answer to.

Thanks,
Lillielu

xstitcher Posted 5 Apr 2008 , 9:13am
post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by lillielu

Thanks Tracey 1970! But I have one other question: If you put the nail in before you put in the batter, how do you tap the pan to get bubbles out? i know that maybe a silly question; but its one I don't know the answer to.

Thanks,
Lillielu





I just used the nail for my last 2 cakes and it still stays put when you tap the pan. I have put the nail in the middle and then spread my batter around it but I just read here that some folks put the batter in and then put the nail in. I'll have to give that a try next time but the first way has worked for all 4 pans that I have used them for.

Steph36 Posted 5 Apr 2008 , 10:02am
post #20 of 22

I cant sing the praises enough, I was really confused at first about the whole heating core thing and found so much helpful info on this site about the flower nails.

Like the PP's, I put the nail in first and then pour the batter in, tap the mix with no problem. I find the weight of the batter holds the nail in place any way. Crumb coat covers the small hole with no problem.

Have a go at doing a trial cake if you aren't sure, you will be amazed!

Good Luck
Steph

lillielu Posted 6 Apr 2008 , 1:16am
post #21 of 22

Thanks to all!!!! I'm going to try the nail on my next cake. I'll let you all know how it turns out. You guys are so helpful. Bless you all!!

Lillielu

wendy1273 Posted 6 Apr 2008 , 3:40am
post #22 of 22

Everyone,
I used the nail too and it worked ok until I found better way.
If you wrap a wet strip of towel around the pan it works like a charm, I promise that you are going to love me for ever for this tip.

I use it on any size pan even on a 14" x 14" and I don't have to put a flower nail or a heating core. I been doing this for a few months and I have no problems at all and the cake rise evenly and you don't have to level it by cutting.

I learned this from Jennifer Dontz the cake teacher (Love her work, she is the best)

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%