Display Cakes

Business By lovetofrost Updated 25 Apr 2008 , 6:35pm by jenbakescakes

lovetofrost Posted 25 Mar 2008 , 2:48am
post #1 of 17

I was talking to a possible customer and she said she went to a bakery and they had several cakes on display and that is why she decided to use them b/c they had a cake there they really loved. How do you make a display cake and how long would it last? Do you use some kind of box instead of cake and royal icing or is there another trick. Just was interested in making my own display cakes and didn't know the procedure. Thanks.

16 replies
funbun Posted 25 Mar 2008 , 3:27am
post #2 of 17

Just use a cake dummie (styrafoam or wood) and cover in plastic wrap and cover in fondant or royal icing as you would a regular cake. icon_biggrin.gif

I have kept decorated dummies for at least a year on display and they still look as pretty as when they were first made.
HTH

Bonnie151 Posted 25 Mar 2008 , 6:45am
post #3 of 17

Yep, definitely invest in some dummies. Most of my cake photos are dummies right now because I'm just starting to get set up in business- you can reuse them so they're a fairly cheap way to be able to play about with different styles as well as giving you an instant display to show off your cakes. icon_biggrin.gif

Solecito Posted 25 Mar 2008 , 8:20pm
post #4 of 17

Bonnie 151: Your cakes are so beautiful!!

Bonnie151 Posted 25 Mar 2008 , 10:06pm
post #5 of 17

Thank you Solicito - that's very kind of you to say. icon_smile.gif

indydebi Posted 25 Mar 2008 , 11:08pm
post #6 of 17

I have 9 or 10 styrofoam cakes on display and over half of them are a year old. I use BC right on the styrofoam. It's funny ..... the same BC that crusts well but stays soft for eating on cakes, will turn as hard as concrete when applied to styrofoam.

It's helpful, not only to showcase your work, but you can point to a 14/10/6 on display and tell them "That's the sizes we will be using for your cake".

Erdica Posted 26 Mar 2008 , 11:18am
post #7 of 17

Cake dummies are great!

I have 2 cakes that are over 3 yrs old and they still look really good. I'm slowly taking them out of the cycle as I add new designs to my little army of display cakes.

craftyone65 Posted 28 Mar 2008 , 11:42am
post #8 of 17

I live in Florida (can't sell from home...not even sure I want to) but I just got a job working in a cafe baking 2 days a week. Was thinking of investing in some dummy cakes to display in the future. Where is the best place to buy them?

tiggy2 Posted 28 Mar 2008 , 6:53pm
post #9 of 17

A lot of people buy their dummies from Dallas Foam and say they have the best prices.

tcakes65 Posted 28 Mar 2008 , 7:16pm
post #10 of 17

I tried covering the dummy in plastic wrap as funbun said, but the fondant would not stick to it. What's the trick?

Indydebi, I did the same with buttercream and was shocked at how hard it gets. I do have one question, could this potentially attract unwanted insects? I was a little concerned to continue that method.

krazykat_14 Posted 28 Mar 2008 , 7:46pm
post #11 of 17

I got my dummies from dallas-foam.com- GREAT prices and really nice people.

ok, what's up with that? I put it in without the hyphen and it said [blocked]... was it because that was the incorrect link or because we don't like them anymore?

indydebi Posted 30 Mar 2008 , 12:15am
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by metrocakes

I tried covering the dummy in plastic wrap as funbun said, but the fondant would not stick to it. What's the trick?

Indydebi, I did the same with buttercream and was shocked at how hard it gets. I do have one question, could this potentially attract unwanted insects? I was a little concerned to continue that method.




I've had dummy cakes sitting out for over a year and never had any unwanted critters!

lovetofrost Posted 4 Apr 2008 , 1:40am
post #13 of 17

Thanks guys for all your advice on this. I ended up purchasing a round set and a hexagon set from taylorfoam.com. Man it shipped fast. I just got them in today and am soooo excited to practice. Hopefully I'll be adding more pics soon now.

funbun Posted 5 Apr 2008 , 4:51am
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by metrocakes

I tried covering the dummy in plastic wrap as funbun said, but the fondant would not stick to it. What's the trick?




Sorry it took so long to get back to you! icon_redface.gif

This is what I do and it works for me. I wrap the dummy in plastic wrap and then add a thin layer of buttercream icing, then I roll out my fondant and apply over the buttercream. I hope this makes sense and solves your problem with the fondant not sticking. I know some people who just omit the plastic wrap and treat the dummy like a regular cake.

Good Luck icon_biggrin.gif

alidpayne Posted 23 Apr 2008 , 1:04pm
post #15 of 17

Ok guys, question. I was looking at Dallas Foam's website, and I see that they have like a MILLION size combos. I am a total newbie, and I have no idea what the most common sizes and shapes are.

I just want to get some dummies to practice on. I intend to practice on them and take photos of the results to learn & build a portfolio of sorts. I have only made a few cakes, and they have been met with great enthusiasm from the recipients. I know that if I logged some practice hours I will impove. My husband is on a very strict diet for health reasons, so I don't want all kinds of cake laying around tempting him, so I am trying to limit real cakes to ones that will be going somewhere else to live. lol

What are the most commonly reqested shapes & sizes? I also notice that most of their dummies come in 3", 4" or 5" tall, which of those is more common?

indydebi Posted 23 Apr 2008 , 1:08pm
post #16 of 17

4" tall is the standard. 14/10/6 is the most common size (approx 100 servings+/-). YOu can do display cakes that are smaller, just to show design, but I find brides what to know "what size cake will I have", so I like ot have multiple combinations ... 14/12/8 .... 14/10/8/6, etc. I use a lot of 8"

jenbakescakes Posted 25 Apr 2008 , 6:35pm
post #17 of 17

Also I wanted to add that you can go to Lowes and get a 4 ft x 8 ft sheet of 1 or 2 inch thick styrofoam and cut your own dummies. I havent checked online prices of dummies, but it's pretty cheap the way I described. I did both my State Fair cakes and a recent practice cake this way. I just cut the sizes and shapes I needed with an electric knife and hot glued them together. It's a little more work but gives you total freedom of sizes and shapes and you can get it right away. It's in the insulation section at Lowes. Good Luck! thumbs_up.gif

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