Do You Tell The People About The Dowel Rods In The Cakes

Decorating By cakebaker1957 Updated 30 Oct 2007 , 1:17am by indydebi

cakebaker1957 Posted 29 Oct 2007 , 6:47pm
post #1 of 10

Just wondering when i do a cake for someone and have to add dowel rods i get a little nervous i tell them several times about them being in the cakes, do you all do this and if you do a wedding cake do you have them to sign something stating that they know there in the cakes and your not responsible for accidents, just wondering the more i bake cakes and have the rods in them the more i get nervious.
Thanks for everthing

9 replies
tiptop57 Posted 29 Oct 2007 , 7:20pm
post #2 of 10

Of course, why not and I also tell them what pieces should be pulled off because of the gumpaste being so hard and I tell them the easiest way to cut it. And no to the release as long as they have my contract.

HTH

jescapades Posted 29 Oct 2007 , 7:24pm
post #3 of 10

i just did a cake this weekend that had 4 dowels in the bottom layer and a cake board in between layers. i told the customer that they were all there, so they wouldn't try to cut the two cakes together and wonder what was up (then ultimately ruin it). she seemed to know what i was talking about, so it was no problem. i have yet to do a wedding cake, but i would say if you add it to your contract, they are signing it anyway.

good luck!

mamacc Posted 29 Oct 2007 , 7:24pm
post #4 of 10

Yes, I usually tell people about the dowels but more for 3D cakes than wedding cakes. I figure people usually expect them in wedding cakes. I like to give people a heads up on the 3D cakes though b/c it's not obvious as to WHERE all the dowels are.

Courtney

ccr03 Posted 29 Oct 2007 , 7:38pm
post #5 of 10

Ditto. Whenever and wherever I use a dowel, I tell the customer. I see no reason why not to. I'd rather them be expecting it than to be surprised.

MFitz Posted 29 Oct 2007 , 7:39pm
post #6 of 10

I have a "Drop Off Customer Signature Form"- signed by the "designated person" at the banquet hall or party.

It has a diagram where the dowels are and how to cut and slice the cake
This ensures:

That the cake serves as many as the contract promises (they can't say we only got 75 slices etc)

and the cake was in perfect condition at delivery and our responsibilty ends there (if friend or waiter causes damage it is not our responsibility.)

Even at small functions this is a good idea.

indydebi Posted 29 Oct 2007 , 8:40pm
post #7 of 10

Since I'm the one who usually cuts my own wedding cakes, it rarely comes up.

However.... I do have D&R cakes once in a while (Drop-n-Run). In that case, I will tell the facility contact person if I have done the dowel-rod-down-the-center thing so they know how to take it apart. Otherwise, they are well aware of how a wedding cake is constructed.

I also tell them what equipment needs returned and that I have provided a white trash bag for the equipment and that i will come back and pick it up on Monday; I put the bag under the cake table and it has my name/number written on it with black magic marker.

If everything is disposable or not worth the gas to come back and get it (not making a special trip for ten or fifteen bucks worth of pillars and masonite boards), I let them know they can keep it or trash it but I don't want it back. (The country club the past weekend said, "YAY!!!!!!!! No REturnables!!!!!!!!" icon_lol.gif )

But logically, when they go to cut your cake and they remove the top tier, they will see the wooden dowels in the bottom tier.

MFitz Posted 30 Oct 2007 , 12:17am
post #8 of 10

Indy Deb-

Do you have a cake cutting charge?
How long do you stay at the reception or do you or someone come back for the cutting?

fondantgrl Posted 30 Oct 2007 , 12:59am
post #9 of 10

what's there to hide about dowels ? it's part of cake construction.

They need to know so they can remove them b4 cutting, although it is something that can be seen easily when cutting .

indydebi Posted 30 Oct 2007 , 1:17am
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by MFitz

Indy Deb-

Do you have a cake cutting charge?
How long do you stay at the reception or do you or someone come back for the cutting?




No, I do not have a cake cutting charge.

I sell my wedding cakes two ways: One is cake-only (what you've seen me call a D&R - Drop 'n Run). This is cake, delivery, set-up only. $3/person.

2nd way is the full package which includes plates & forks, punch & cups, mints & nuts, tablecloth/skirting, delivery, set-up, I stay and serve the cake, clean up and tear down. This is $6/person.

Cake only, whether it was full package or D&R, was only 6.2% of my 2007 sales.

Most of the time, I'm also doing the buffet catering, so I'm there anyway..... no big hardship, time-wise, to take 10-15 minutes to cut a cake. ALWAYS encourage brides to do the cake-cutting ceremony shortly after they arrive at the reception, THEN open the buffet. This way, when people are done eating, I can go ahead and cut the cake. If they do the ceremony later in the night, then I have to sit around and twiddle my thumbs waiting for them to cut the cake.

If they get the cake from someone else and the buffet from me, I will cut the cake for them at no extra charge *IF* they do the cake-cutting ceremony when they arrive. Otherwise, if they make me hang around longer than necessary just to cut someone else's cake, then I charge them a $50 minimum.

I also put a $35 per 100 guests "plates and forks" charge on my invoices if they buy the cake from someone else. If they buy the cake elsewhere, the bride has to provide the plates and forks. and they never do. And they look to me to bail them out. And it gets expensive. So I put the charge on the invoice up front. If they "forget" the plates, they are covered with plates and forks and I'm not providing them for free. Win-win.

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