Omg!!!! I'm Beyond Annoyed Right Now

Decorating By Babarooskie Updated 31 Oct 2007 , 2:02am by joynerkitchen

Babarooskie Posted 29 Oct 2007 , 5:21pm
post #1 of 27

I have 3 orders this weekend. 2 of them are driving me crazy!!!!
Both women have no idea what they want for their children's cakes. So then they ask the infamous question, " What do you think? What would you do?"

AAAAHHHHHH... It's not my kids party, geez!
Then one of them says it's a little too much.
40 people, Chocolate & Vanilla w/ cookie dough filling, BC, and fondant roses and flowers. I charged her $80. I think thats fair!
I'm about to tell them both to send me a copy of the invitations and let me make a replica of their birthday party invitation- I always think thats easiest...What do you all think?
Thanks for letting me vent icon_sad.gif

26 replies
leepat Posted 29 Oct 2007 , 5:30pm
post #2 of 27

If they have an invitation, I always like to try to match it as close as possible. They usually love it.

pat

fooby Posted 29 Oct 2007 , 5:33pm
post #3 of 27

Sounds like the party invitation is a good way to go. Goodluck!!

Denae Posted 29 Oct 2007 , 5:33pm
post #4 of 27

i know what you mean, i hate it when people are indecisive. i love to get a copy of the invitation, that wasy i can go with it. it's so much easier. i think $80 is plenty fair. if she doesnt want to pay that much for it, then she should get all the different things. people aren't paying for the cake itself. they are paying for the time and decorations. hth! good luck!

angelas2babies Posted 29 Oct 2007 , 5:33pm
post #5 of 27

That's a great idea about the invitations. The only thing that makes me nervous when dealing with uncertain people that want me to decide on the cake is that it's very easy for them to not be happy.

I would ask for the party theme and send them multiple cakes for ideas and at the very least get some feedback. Is there something they like or hate about the cakes, for instance. I need something to go by for a cake order. Unless it's a gift cake, I make sure they know what they are paying for.

As for pricing, I am the queen of undercutting myself, so I can't offer good advice other than to stick to your price. People just don't understand the amount of time that goes into cake decorating.

Good luck!!
Angie

Babarooskie Posted 29 Oct 2007 , 5:41pm
post #6 of 27

Thanks everyone for your input and advice!
And what kind of ticks me off, is that I make those roses by hand- and I'm not an expert on cake decorating either but, geez..it bothers me.

chovest Posted 29 Oct 2007 , 5:43pm
post #7 of 27

The invitation is a great idea. For my daughters' birthdays I just ask them what they want. (This can be a brave step at times though.) They are usually very quick with coming up with a favorite character or color scheme. If the birthday child is thrilled with the cake, the parents are likely to be too!

imagine76 Posted 29 Oct 2007 , 5:52pm
post #8 of 27

yeah, the invitation idea is your safest bet. how many times have we all had those moments where it runs through your head "well you could bake some cup cakes yourself for a few bucks!"

your frustration is not unwarrented and neither is your price!

Babarooskie Posted 29 Oct 2007 , 6:20pm
post #9 of 27

Thank you all so much!!
I sent them an e-mail and still waiting for a response...

snowshoe1 Posted 29 Oct 2007 , 7:08pm
post #10 of 27

Love the invitation idea.

I'm wondering why the frustration at clients not knowing what they want - I'm not a professional and when I need a REAL cake I go to an accomplished baker/designer such as many of you on this board (I'm on the board to get ideas, admire others work, and learn (and I've learned alot so a big thanks)).

But I so often read this frustration from the CC pros: someone comes to them with no idea what they want. I do the same thing - I go to my local designer, tell her what my party is for, how many attending, and she runs ideas past me. I always figured I'm paying her $2 - 4 a serving for her creative brain power and skills in putting the confection together. Isn't this the case?

Babarooskie Posted 29 Oct 2007 , 8:39pm
post #11 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by snowshoe1

Love the invitation idea.

I'm wondering why the frustration at clients not knowing what they want - I'm not a professional and when I need a REAL cake I go to an accomplished baker/designer such as many of you on this board (I'm on the board to get ideas, admire others work, and learn (and I've learned alot so a big thanks)).

But I so often read this frustration from the CC pros: someone comes to them with no idea what they want. I do the same thing - I go to my local designer, tell her what my party is for, how many attending, and she runs ideas past me. I always figured I'm paying her $2 - 4 a serving for her creative brain power and skills in putting the confection together. Isn't this the case?




I understand what you're saying- but it'll make it easier if the client had something that she wanted, any suggestions, etc.
First my client said to match her daughters dress- no problem, I gave her ideas and she liked it. Then I sent her pictures of other cakes so she can see my flowers...then she changed her mind...then she spoke to her husband and changed her mind again. It's frustrating because then you (or me at least) has to calculate a new price for them and come up with other things now.
But we had sent e-mail to each other and she apologized for being a pain, but I guess I'm over it. I mean, this is just a cake for 40 people- imagine her wedding!

indydebi Posted 29 Oct 2007 , 8:46pm
post #12 of 27

I run into this once in a blue moon with a bride. At some point, I pretty much tell her, "Oh I don't mind indecision. It just means I get to do whatever I want and you get to like it whether you do or not!" That usually gets them laughing and we start narrowing it down.

Normally, they are shopping way in advance and I can tell them they don't have to decide today ... they have plenty of time, so search the internet, look thru magz, and we can get together about 2-3 months before their wedding to finalize everything.

I understand you rarely have that kind of time before a birthday, though. I don't open Pandora's box. If she liked the dress idea (using the above example), then we're going with the dress idea. I'm not going to send her more ideas because I would consider the issue closed.....no new ideas needed.

tonedna Posted 29 Oct 2007 , 8:52pm
post #13 of 27

The invitation is usually a no fail way to win..They bought the invite cause they like the design so probabilites are they will like the cake cause it matches!icon_biggrin.gif

playingwithsugar Posted 29 Oct 2007 , 8:57pm
post #14 of 27

For FamilyFests that require an invitation, we always use the invitation as the source of inspiration for the cake (weddings excluded, unless that is what the bride wishes).

I would call them and tell them that you need an answer or a copy of the invitation by today, or you will not be able to do anything but plain writing and borders. That should set a fire under their butts.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

tonedna Posted 29 Oct 2007 , 9:11pm
post #15 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by snowshoe1

Love the invitation idea.

I'm wondering why the frustration at clients not knowing what they want - I'm not a professional and when I need a REAL cake I go to an accomplished baker/designer such as many of you on this board (I'm on the board to get ideas, admire others work, and learn (and I've learned alot so a big thanks)).

But I so often read this frustration from the CC pros: someone comes to them with no idea what they want. I do the same thing - I go to my local designer, tell her what my party is for, how many attending, and she runs ideas past me. I always figured I'm paying her $2 - 4 a serving for her creative brain power and skills in putting the confection together. Isn't this the case?




Honestly what I d with the people that want this type of treatment...i just say ok...give me your invite or faorite colors and they will only see the finish cake..I never had any troubles with not liking the cakes..I just make sure they sign on the dotted line...At designers discretion
icon_lol.gif

mamacc Posted 29 Oct 2007 , 10:00pm
post #16 of 27

I actually don't mind it when they don't really know what they want for their kids. I ask them what the child's interests are/fave colors....etc. Then I see what I'm "feeling" and go with that. I don't give them too many details and they are always happy with the end result. I guess I like having some freedom with the design...

Courtney

Eggshells Posted 29 Oct 2007 , 11:37pm
post #17 of 27

Is anyone else uneasy with the fact that the invite is a copywritten work and therefore can't be reproduced?

Taken as "inspiration" is another thing and quite acceptable though...

Eggshells Posted 29 Oct 2007 , 11:37pm
post #18 of 27

Is anyone else uneasy with the fact that the invite is a copywritten work and therefore can't be reproduced?

Taken as "inspiration" is another thing and quite acceptable though...

playingwithsugar Posted 30 Oct 2007 , 12:06am
post #19 of 27

Taking the ball from Snowshoe1 -

How about telling them that there is an extra charge if you have to come up with a custom design for them? That might wake them up, too.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

Babarooskie Posted 30 Oct 2007 , 12:19am
post #20 of 27

I didn't mean like copying everything exactly the same from the invitation...
For example, if the invitation has stripes, I put stripes (of fondant) with the matching colors of the cake...
Don't get me wrong, I like to be creative and see what I come up with....but I'll only experiement with family and friends- never a paying customer. What if they don't like it??
Anyway... everything is fine and dandy...she made up her mind (again) and told me what she wanted. But thank you all for your advice and suggestions, and most importantly- letting me vent icon_lol.gif

Have a great night, everyone!!

tonedna Posted 30 Oct 2007 , 2:54am
post #21 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eggshells

Is anyone else uneasy with the fact that the invite is a copywritten work and therefore can't be reproduced?

Taken as "inspiration" is another thing and quite acceptable though...




I think everybody in here doesn't make an exact copy of the card on a cake...Is more about taking colors and ideas... icon_smile.gif

artist63 Posted 30 Oct 2007 , 10:22am
post #22 of 27

and I always thought it was helpful to ask the baker what they thought, or just say do whatever you think you are the artist here. lol I am pretty easy going and always figured if they got to make what interested them it would be more fun and in being more fun might even be more unique. Now I feel kind of bad. Wow all these years I thought I was so easy to please didn't know it is people like me that frustrate others.

Babarooskie Posted 30 Oct 2007 , 1:17pm
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by artist63

and I always thought it was helpful to ask the baker what they thought, or just say do whatever you think you are the artist here. lol I am pretty easy going and always figured if they got to make what interested them it would be more fun and in being more fun might even be more unique. Now I feel kind of bad. Wow all these years I thought I was so easy to please didn't know it is people like me that frustrate others.




Please don't take it the wrong way- it's just when (and I'm going to use myself as an example) I have 3 or 4 other orders, it's time consuming and kind of difficult to "come up" with something that I hope you like...It's just me but I like to be safe than sorry and it would be helpful if the client had a suggestion or already something in mind that they would like..

snowshoe1 Posted 30 Oct 2007 , 1:23pm
post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by playingwithsugar

Taking the ball from Snowshoe1 -

How about telling them that there is an extra charge if you have to come up with a custom design for them? That might wake them up, too.

Theresa icon_smile.gif




Oh yes - you should absolutely charge for design services or it should be built into the price. I usually pay extra when it is a collaboration effort (I assume this is because I'm getting a 'one of a kind' confection) - if I wanted a regular cake I'd make it myself or go to Walmart. I figure I'm paying for her talent and design style that I don't have (but hopefully will some day!!). I paid a premium to the architect, general contractor, and interior designer who collaborated with me when I went through a renovation. I work in the financial industry and if someone moans about trading fees - well, trade on your own, pay $10 a trade, and don't expect the same level of expertise, personal phone calls, personalized financial advice, etc...

artist63 Posted 31 Oct 2007 , 1:16am
post #25 of 27

no offense barbarooskie I was serious here I thought I was being nice by giving artistic freedom. Now hearing it from the other side I can totally see where it is frustrating to just come up with something that you hope your client wants. It was a good lesson for me.

joynerkitchen Posted 31 Oct 2007 , 2:02am
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by artist63

no offense barbarooskie I was serious here I thought I was being nice by giving artistic freedom. Now hearing it from the other side I can totally see where it is frustrating to just come up with something that you hope your client wants. It was a good lesson for me.




Maybe I'm missing something, but from what I understood all of your posts to mean you give them creative freedom and don't come back with wishy washy, "I don't know, I was hoping for something else, but I still don't know what it is I'm hoping for.

I would love the client who says here's what we are doing, come up with something you think will fit. Once I show the sketch or "something" I've come up with they might tweak what I've shown them, but not actually said, well "that's not what I was thinking of, but I don't have any suggests to help."

I think there is a difference between these two types of customers!

joynerkitchen Posted 31 Oct 2007 , 2:02am
post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by artist63

no offense barbarooskie I was serious here I thought I was being nice by giving artistic freedom. Now hearing it from the other side I can totally see where it is frustrating to just come up with something that you hope your client wants. It was a good lesson for me.




Maybe I'm missing something, but from what I understood all of your posts to mean you give them creative freedom and don't come back with wishy washy, "I don't know, I was hoping for something else, but I still don't know what it is I'm hoping for.

I would love the client who says here's what we are doing, come up with something you think will fit. Once I show the sketch or "something" I've come up with they might tweak what I've shown them, but not actually said, well "that's not what I was thinking of, but I don't have any suggests to help."

I think there is a difference between these two types of customers!

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