Question On Extra-Large Eggs

Decorating By Naty Updated 22 Oct 2007 , 12:55am by jmt1714

Naty Posted 21 Oct 2007 , 12:43pm
post #1 of 6

Hi everyone, I have a recipe that calls for 6 extra-large eggs. I only have large eggs. Do I use 7 to make up for the 6 extra-large ones?

Thanks,
Naty

5 replies
Metabea Posted 21 Oct 2007 , 12:57pm
post #2 of 6

This is what I found for you icon_smile.gif

The majority of cooking recipes will specify for large eggs however, you could use the equivalent in medium or extra large eggs.

* 1 large egg is the equivalent of 1 medium egg or 1 extra large egg.
* 2 large eggs is the equivalent of 2 medium eggs or 2 extra large eggs.
* 3 large eggs is the equivalent of 4 medium eggs or 3 extra large eggs.
* 4 large eggs is the equivalent of 5 medium eggs or 4 extra large eggs.
* 5 large eggs is the equivalent of 6 medium eggs or 5 extra large eggs.

Eggs are sized on their weight. Therefore, medium eggs weigh between 53 - 63g, large eggs weigh between 63 - 73g and extra large eggs weigh more than 73g.

sugarlove Posted 21 Oct 2007 , 2:30pm
post #3 of 6

In baking that would not be correct...1 large egg is not equal to 1 medium or 1 extra large egg because 1 medium weighs less and 1 extra large weighs more. I always weigh my ingredients including the eggs. For example, if you are making IMBC and the recipe calls for 1 large egg and you use 1 medium egg then your buttercream will not come out right because it doesn't have the minimum amount of egg whites required in relation to the butter and sugar. On the other hand if you use extra large eggs you'll use fewer eggs if the recipe calls for 8-10 large egg whites for 10oz of whites then with extra large eggs you are likely to only need about 5 or 6 extra large egg whites since they are larger eggs. In baking it is really important to weigh ingredients and record recipes using weights, doing it this way it wouldn't matter if you used medium,large, or extra large eggs because the amount needed would be in grams or ounces.

indydebi Posted 21 Oct 2007 , 3:46pm
post #4 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metabea


* 1 large egg is the equivalent of 1 medium egg or 1 extra large egg.
* 2 large eggs is the equivalent of 2 medium eggs or 2 extra large eggs.
* 3 large eggs is the equivalent of 4 medium eggs or 3 extra large eggs.
* 4 large eggs is the equivalent of 5 medium eggs or 4 extra large eggs.
* 5 large eggs is the equivalent of 6 medium eggs or 5 extra large eggs.

Eggs are sized on their weight. Therefore, medium eggs weigh between 53 - 63g, large eggs weigh between 63 - 73g and extra large eggs weigh more than 73g.




The bulk of this chart makes no sense to me! If a large egg is the same as a medium or extra large, then why do they even sell three different sizes? icon_confused.gif If this is true, then it sounds like consumer rip off to me .... charging more for extra large eggs when they appear to be the same as a large egg????

And under the logic displayed, if a large egg is the same as a medium or extra large, then under the mathematical communitive property rule, can we say a medium egg is the same as an extra large egg?

This is just. not. logical.

Metabea Posted 21 Oct 2007 , 11:20pm
post #5 of 6

I understand it in a way to be similiar to weight watcher points... as today I was eatting a non fat caramel dip for my apple dippers if I ate the whole thing it would be 7 points... if I ate the 3 servings seperate then it would only be 6 points... I figure it's that borderline #'s that make the difference. But then I never buy extra large eggs, always buy the large and if I was at all in wonder I guess I would wiegh them to see how much they weighed and figure from that.

Eggs are sized on their weight. Therefore, medium eggs weigh between 53 - 63g, large eggs weigh between 63 - 73g and extra large eggs weigh more than 73g. (so if you weigh your x-tra large eggs and they are 73 g then that is where the chart would be right... I didn't make the chart I just found it here http://www.helpwithcooking.com/egg-guide/guide-to-eggs.html)

jmt1714 Posted 22 Oct 2007 , 12:55am
post #6 of 6

I also weigh - for example I have a recipe that calls for 12 oz of egg whites, or 10 egg white. But when I measure, I usually end up using 11-12 egg whites (likely I leave some on in the yolk/shell.

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