How To Stack A Bc Iced Tiered Cake

Decorating By blissful Updated 1 Mar 2016 , 5:05pm by cor39

blissful Posted 26 Sep 2006 , 12:41pm
post #1 of 24

I did my first BC wedding cake and had a heck of a time stacking the tiers without making a mess. Is it better to use crusting BC for this or to stack the cake first than ice it at one time when you get to the hall. Any ideas would be appreciated. Thank you

23 replies
mmdd Posted 26 Sep 2006 , 1:51pm
post #2 of 24

I use crusting BC. Stacking isn't that hard....you just have to be very careful.


If I've made a mistake, it's only been at the bottom of that tier and I could cover it up with the border.

Good Luck!

KHalstead Posted 26 Sep 2006 , 1:55pm
post #3 of 24

try refrigerating the cakes before stacking.........then they are more durable while stacking and the icing won't smudge or smush quite as easily!

KittisKakes Posted 26 Sep 2006 , 1:59pm
post #4 of 24

After you get your supports cut to the right length, insert them into the cake about 3/4 of the way down. Sit the cake on top of the supports and let the weight of the cake push them down the rest of the way. This will keep you from getting your fingers in the icing.

I've never tried to ice the cake after it was stacked. I guess the main problem with that is there will be no icing on the tops of the stacked cakes.

Loucinda Posted 26 Sep 2006 , 2:00pm
post #5 of 24

I do the same as KittisKakes - works like a charm! (but remember the bigger the layer, the quicker it is going to push the dowels in - make sure to get your fingers out of the way!) I have never (knock on wood) messed a cake up doing it this way.

mkerton Posted 26 Sep 2006 , 2:03pm
post #6 of 24

I just did that same thing (inserting the dowels only 3/4 in) and it worked like a charm...

jylbug Posted 26 Sep 2006 , 6:50pm
post #7 of 24

Great tip. I can't wait to try it.

blissful Posted 26 Sep 2006 , 8:05pm
post #8 of 24

thank you all again, i'll try that next time

ConnieB Posted 26 Sep 2006 , 8:14pm
post #9 of 24

This is probably a stupid question....but how do you know what length to cut the dowels? How do you measure them? icon_redface.gif

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CONFECTIONCONNECTION Posted 27 Sep 2006 , 1:13am
post #10 of 24

Speaking of dowels.....I have substituted McDonalds straws....they are much easier to cut to size. They are very sturdy and have never had a problem. Remember MUST be McDonalds!!!!!!

sweetamber Posted 27 Sep 2006 , 1:35am
post #11 of 24

Some helpful member (sorry- I can't remember who) offered this link for bubble tea straws:
http://www.bubbleteasupply.com/store/store.php3?item_id=2
They're fat and sturdy and perfect for stacked cakes- not to mention cheap!

Amber

vanz Posted 27 Sep 2006 , 1:59am
post #12 of 24

Just wanna add: I read somewhere here a tip & wanna share it with you.

Put a sheet of parchment paper under the cakeboard to prevent icing from sticking to the cake board and making a mess when cutting the cakes.

I hope this make sense.

CONFECTIONCONNECTION Posted 27 Sep 2006 , 2:18am
post #13 of 24
Quote:
Quote:

They're fat and sturdy and perfect for stacked cakes- not to mention cheap!


Wow Amber-Thanks for that info. I think I will have to try them out. Have you ever used them? Maybe I can quit ordering a large diet with 20 straws!!! icon_lol.gifthumbs_up.gif

Julie

sweetamber Posted 27 Sep 2006 , 2:33am
post #14 of 24

I actually tried them a couple of days ago for the first time. They worked great! I was wondering how you were getting all those McD's straws....

Amber

ps- where in Mich are you? I'm south of kalamazoo

magentaa23 Posted 27 Sep 2006 , 2:52am
post #15 of 24

i refrigerate my cakes for a few hours after i ice them, so the icing is hard.. then i stack... i never had a smudge when i stack them

CONFECTIONCONNECTION Posted 27 Sep 2006 , 2:53am
post #16 of 24

I am south of Detroit. How many tiers did you stack using those straws?

Julie

sweetamber Posted 27 Sep 2006 , 3:00am
post #17 of 24

3 tiers...well I guess I only stacked 2 of them! It was a 10,8,6" cakeand I used 6 straws to support the 8 inch (5 in a circle and 1 in the middle) and 4 straws for the 6". I let this cake sit out at room temp for 8 hours- all part of my test- and everything held up just fine. I even moved it from one counter to another.

Amber

Jenn1978 Posted 27 Sep 2006 , 8:51am
post #18 of 24

[/QUOTE]Put a sheet of parchment paper under the cakeboard to prevent icing from sticking to the cake board and making a mess when cutting the cakes.


We use to put shredded coconut under teh cake board to prevent it from sticking, never thought about parchment paper....

cowdex Posted 27 Sep 2006 , 8:58am
post #19 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConnieB

This is probably a stupid question....but how do you know what length to cut the dowels? How do you measure them? icon_redface.gif

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I push mine in - score it with a finger nail then cut it to size. To cut use NEW pet nail clippers, pruning sheers or a small saw.

AMW Posted 27 Sep 2006 , 10:29am
post #20 of 24

Cakes that are cold transfer well while stacking. You can also use pizza paddles to transfer the cakes and then there are no fingers underneath. You can set one edge down and cleanly pull the paddle out. This was a god send to me! Just a note on the straws. I have always used straws but never from McDonalds. As long as they are not the flexible bendy type you are ok and, obviously, the thicker the better. I have stacked up to six fondant covered tiers with over 15 pounds of chocolate ornamentation (outrageously heavy) and it was just fine. I transport most of my cakes already assembled. Never any slippage. The whole engineering behind them and why they work is kinda fascinating.

blissful Posted 27 Sep 2006 , 12:00pm
post #21 of 24

All the ideas sound great but do you do the same thing when it is a wedding cake? I like to bring the cake tiers to the hall and stack it there, instead of finishing the cake at home and taking the chance of it falling over while I'm driving. There are so crazy drivers out there......like me icon_lol.gif

MrsMissey Posted 27 Sep 2006 , 12:27pm
post #22 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by ConnieB

This is probably a stupid question....but how do you know what length to cut the dowels? How do you measure them? icon_redface.gif

usaribbon.gif




Here is a link to an article on Cakecentral regarding stacked cakes. HTH!

http://www.cakecentral.com/article23-Teired-Stacked-Cake-Construction.html

ConnieB Posted 27 Sep 2006 , 12:54pm
post #23 of 24
Quote:
Quote:

I push mine in - score it with a finger nail then cut it to size. To cut use NEW pet nail clippers, pruning sheers or a small saw.




Quote:
Quote:

Here is a link to an article on Cakecentral regarding stacked cakes. HTH!

http://www.cakecentral.com/article23-Teired-Stacked-Cake-Construction.html




They y'all for all your help, I really appreciate it!

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cor39 Posted 1 Mar 2016 , 5:05pm
post #24 of 24

Question:  Is each layer supposed to be on an individual cake board?

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