Glaze For Fondant?? (Or How Do I Make Fondant Shiny)

Decorating By cryssi Updated 6 May 2014 , 1:57am by poey223

cryssi Posted 28 Jun 2006 , 3:49pm
post #1 of 24

I did a seach but didn't come up with anything...

Has anyone put some sort of glaze on fondant to make it shiny? I was thinking of just using unflavored gelatin and brushing it on. I know that the problem with gelatin is that if you use a pastry brush, it will leave lines. I've been thinking about this, and wondered if a simple powdered sugar/water glaze would be shiny enough. I'm making a watermelon cake, and wanted to get the smooth, shiny look of a watermelon...although when I looked at one last night it wasn't all that shiny so maybe I wouldn't need it...

Anyway, TIA!

crystal

23 replies
moydear77 Posted 28 Jun 2006 , 3:53pm
post #2 of 24

Air brush it with luster dust or paint with Luster Dust.

leta Posted 28 Jun 2006 , 4:03pm
post #3 of 24

One thing you might try is taking a ball of fondant in your hand and rubbing it over your fondant covered cake. That can polish it up and make it shiny.

cryssi Posted 28 Jun 2006 , 4:38pm
post #4 of 24

hmm, thanks! I didn't want to use luster dust b/c I wanted that glassy sort of look. I'll definitely try the fondant rubbing, though! That might work!

MissBaritone Posted 28 Jun 2006 , 4:54pm
post #5 of 24

rubbing with fondant will make it smooth but it won't make it shiny. The best thing I've found to get a real shine is to mix some glycerine with water so you get a painting consistency then brush it on and it'll dry with a lovely shine

cryssi Posted 28 Jun 2006 , 5:08pm
post #6 of 24

thanks! I'll try the glycerine!

cryssi Posted 5 Jul 2006 , 10:48pm
post #7 of 24

I rolled out my mmf on wax paper sprayed with Pam...gave it a nice, smooth finish...very watermelon-like! icon_smile.gif

DianeLM Posted 5 Jul 2006 , 10:58pm
post #8 of 24

I use confectioner's glaze, but sometimes it's not quite shiny enough. I'm going to try the glycerine and water next time (if I remember!)

MAK Posted 6 Jul 2006 , 4:12am
post #9 of 24

What's the ratio of glycerine to water?

poey223 Posted 29 Apr 2014 , 10:28pm
post #10 of 24

I'm in the same boat. I am making a Cop hat and the front strap and the brim have to look like Patent leather. I wonder how long the glycerine and water will take to dry. 

acakedecorator Posted 29 Apr 2014 , 10:42pm
post #11 of 24

Try steaming it to make it shiny. If you don't have a steamer, I have read that someone used their iron's steam setting (for larger projects like the thread starter's watermelon) and it worked great. For smaller items, someone said that they held it in the steam above boiling water.

Smckinney07 Posted 29 Apr 2014 , 10:47pm
post #12 of 24

A

Original message sent by acakedecorator

Try steaming it to make it shiny. If you don't have a steamer, I have read that someone used their iron's steam setting (for larger projects like the thread starter's watermelon) and it worked great. For smaller items, someone said that they held it in the steam above boiling water.

^^This^^

Or you can mix equal parts of corn syrup (which is similar to glycerine) and vodka/everclear and paint it.

Jakes Cakes Posted 30 Apr 2014 , 4:38am
post #13 of 24

Steaming or Dawn from Dinkydoodle's glaze is excellent :-)

poey223 Posted 30 Apr 2014 , 3:51pm
post #14 of 24

Thanks on the steam idea. I should have said that I am very familiar with that part. There was no way for me to steam it and then put it across the hat so it's already ON the hat. Now there is no way to steam the piece without steaming the hat, itself. So it does need to be some kind of brush on. I am definitely going to try the glycerin and water. 

-K8memphis Posted 30 Apr 2014 , 4:03pm
post #15 of 24

you can brush on gum arabic + water--you might not have any on hand--it's just a white powder costs a couple bucks from a cake deco place--but if you have any edible glitter, read the label, if it's gum arabic -- it is water soluble--just use that--just mix some with a bit of water--y'know test it on a scrap and see how you like it--michael's and hobby lobby sell the edible glitter that's made of gum arabic--the real light weight stuff in the little jars

 

this stuff:

 

http://www.globalsugarart.com/white-glitter-flakes-ounce-by-ck-p-25188.html

poey223 Posted 3 May 2014 , 1:31pm
post #16 of 24

K8Memphis...thanks so much for that suggestion. I am going to try that!!

DeliciousDesserts Posted 4 May 2014 , 3:29pm
post #17 of 24

AI use a spray I purchased from Global Sugar Art. It's a bit expensive, but it's perfect

howsweet Posted 4 May 2014 , 3:40pm
post #18 of 24

Hey, Delicious, which spray do you use? I use the lacquer spray from time to time. I'll spray the cake at set up and delivery. It's like $50 retail, but I like it.

DeliciousDesserts Posted 4 May 2014 , 4:03pm
post #19 of 24

AThat's the one! "Confectionary Arts International Lacquer Spray"

MBalaska Posted 4 May 2014 , 7:50pm
post #20 of 24

For a shiny coat on the buttons that I put on my pink cupcakes; I did the mixture of half Corn Syrup and half Vodka.  Used one of those little 10 cent craft paint brushes and painted it on.

Small project, small cost, easy to do.      

 

http://cakecentral.com/g/i/3158790/a/3436443/jumbo-cupcakes-smbc-gold-painted-fondant/

JaimeCakesLA Posted 5 May 2014 , 8:33pm
post #21 of 24

AWhen I don't steam my cakes (usually for the reason that I don't want to weaken a 3D fondant structure with water) I just paint on pure clear alcohol (vodka or rum. It especially works well with black fondant and gives it a great leather - like look.

paulstonia Posted 5 May 2014 , 8:58pm
post #22 of 24

That's what I do, just brush it with alcohol and it stays shiny.

poey223 Posted 6 May 2014 , 1:55am
post #23 of 24

Lots of great suggestions here. As I said I was going to do, I used the suggestion for the egg whites and shortening..it worked GREAT..buttttt. I did notice that the mixture created small lumps so if you use this, just make sure you wipe the brush before applying it. 

Just a note...straight Vodka was good until it dried completely. I love the look of the leather, but it will NOT give a "patent leather" look that lasts! 

poey223 Posted 6 May 2014 , 1:57am
post #24 of 24

Making a "cop hat" that looks like fabric. Any suggestions for that texture AFTER it's hardened??

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