Taking Care Of Your Feet When Baking/decorating

Decorating By augurey Updated 16 Nov 2011 , 9:24pm by augurey

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Annabakescakes Posted 14 Nov 2011 , 3:24am
post #31 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evoir

I wear hot pink ugly-a** croc knock-offs. I think they cost me $6 a few years ago. That's the first thing I'd suggest you buy. I also just bought a pair of Birkenstock chef clogs and they seem good, but are heavier than crocs. I need these though for doing sugar work, as my crocs have holes in the top!

As a physical therapist, I would also recommend you start slow with baking/decorating on your feet, if you have come from a desk job! You need to ease into it, and also watch the flexibility in your lower legs, upper legs/hips, and lumbar spine. posture is super important, and you need regular breaks, stretches, and strengthening work to improve your caking-fitness! Over time your feet and whole body will adapt to standing long periods, but you need to ease into it. Another key problem area is shoulder and upper limb dysfunction. Again, ease into it, stop for rests, and stretch/strengthen every day.

Even though we have a physically demanding job, you should also do regular exercise out of the kitchen/studio. Swimming and walking are great!

HTH!




Since you mention being a physical therapist and shoulder pain can you recommend anything special for it? All I have to do is hold my shoulder up and it aches like it has been stabbed with a rusty shank. Icing the sides of a cake with a spatula is excruciating!

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Baker_Rose Posted 14 Nov 2011 , 3:08pm
post #32 of 41

I have had foot problems for years. In my experience no ONE kind of shoe will automatically help me. It takes me sometimes 6 months of looking and hours of trying on shoes to find the next pair. So.....I'm always looking.

I have to try them on, one at a time with my existing shoe and "audition" each shoe. I'm not a fun person to shoe shop with!! And I think I have driven several attendants mad.

My last pair of shoes are unconventional. I was shopping for work boots with my husband. His company buys a pair of boots each year and I was hanging out when I started looking for myself. At the time I was still employed and my company required a slip-resistant shoe. I found a work boot that was popular with Gas-well work men and was slip resistant for many different substances. AND I love the lace up ankle support. I invested $150 in the boots and another $50 for my inserts. They are a dream to work in, no pain, no swelling in my ankles and lifting heavy things is more stable with the ankle support.

So, don't think that just one shoe will help, try on many. And if you can, try on the shoes when your feet hurt. You will notice a difference immediately if the shoe works for you. Even the $20 Dr. Schols inserts will help a basic shoe as well.

And, I found that drinking a lot of soda will swell your ankles. You can try the diabetic stockings to help with feet circulation. When you are working and on your feet drink water.

Tami icon_smile.gif

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jgifford Posted 14 Nov 2011 , 3:45pm
post #33 of 41

I only wear nursing shoes - - not only do they have more cushioning on the bottom, they're slip-resistant. As long as I don't get completely stupid, they don't slip on anything. Which is a good thing - - sometimes I can get a little messy, especially if I'm in a hurry.

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sewsugarqueen Posted 14 Nov 2011 , 4:12pm
post #34 of 41

I invested in a pair of SAS( San Antonio Shoes) which were very pricey here but with an insert they give great support and have anti-slip bottoms.
I would love to know if the crocs really give support or just feel good on feet.
I can stand 6-10 hours during the holidays at a bakery but my right foot, ankle and knee will swell. So far these shoes have really helped. I am thinking of bringing one of those mats for me to stand on at production table after reading about them.

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kaseynh Posted 14 Nov 2011 , 4:18pm
post #35 of 41

When I was still able to wear the Sanita clogs, I found this place has great pricing and customer service. http://www.footprints.com/
Due to balance issues and neuropathy, I have to wear a lace up shoe with a wide toe box and sturdy platform so I now wear Keen shoes.

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CalhounsCakery Posted 14 Nov 2011 , 4:54pm
post #36 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annabakescakes

Wow I guess I will be off to buy some [email protected]$$ crocs.... icon_wink.gif




LOL! I feel the same way about them, but looks like I should get some!

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MCurry Posted 14 Nov 2011 , 5:09pm
post #37 of 41

Invest in a good pair of chef shoes. To me that is more important than a mat. Get the mat too for extra support. Many chefs do wear Dansko but I find them too tight and hard to break in.

Either check out Shoes for Crews. I wore the Euro Clogs for years.
www.shoesforcrews.com

I now wear the Klogs brand. Check out the "Professional" section. I wear the Dusty ones. You can also add another insole if they wear out. Zappos.com is where mine were purchased.

Both are around $60.

I also wear support pantyhose most of the time. It is too hot in the summer!

Good luck!

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Evoir Posted 14 Nov 2011 , 10:49pm
post #38 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annabakescakes

Quote:
Originally Posted by Evoir

I wear hot pink ugly-a** croc knock-offs. I think they cost me $6 a few years ago. That's the first thing I'd suggest you buy. I also just bought a pair of Birkenstock chef clogs and they seem good, but are heavier than crocs. I need these though for doing sugar work, as my crocs have holes in the top!

As a physical therapist, I would also recommend you start slow with baking/decorating on your feet, if you have come from a desk job! You need to ease into it, and also watch the flexibility in your lower legs, upper legs/hips, and lumbar spine. posture is super important, and you need regular breaks, stretches, and strengthening work to improve your caking-fitness! Over time your feet and whole body will adapt to standing long periods, but you need to ease into it. Another key problem area is shoulder and upper limb dysfunction. Again, ease into it, stop for rests, and stretch/strengthen every day.

Even though we have a physically demanding job, you should also do regular exercise out of the kitchen/studio. Swimming and walking are great!

HTH!



Since you mention being a physical therapist and shoulder pain can you recommend anything special for it? All I have to do is hold my shoulder up and it aches like it has been stabbed with a rusty shank. Icing the sides of a cake with a spatula is excruciating!





I can recommend you get it looked at by a PT who can prescribe the appropriate set of exercises to help rebalance your rotator cuff muscles around your shoulder joint. They can also detect if you have a torn RC muscle causing an imbalance (there are four RC mms that work together to hold in your main shoulder joint...there is no structural joint stability like in the hip joint). Without actually seeing your shoulder move in all planes of movement it would be irresponsible for me to suggest any particular exercises as I might suggest one that makes your particular dysfunction worse. A physical exam is what you need! PTs then prescribe the right stengthening and stability exercises, plus stretches to help get your shoulder working better again. If you do have a torn RC mm you need an orthopaedic review, as they can be repaired surgically. Good luck!

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costumeczar Posted 15 Nov 2011 , 12:41am
post #39 of 41

OOOoh, Evoir, I didn't know you were a PT! My physical therapist showed me that my hand going numb wasn't carpal tunnel, it was bad posture. The shoulder stuff is spot on. The more you hunch over the counter the worse your shoulders get, and it affects your hips and your hands and everything. I'm a big wreck. He told me to stop working for 5 minutes every hour to stretch the muscles on the front of my shoulder. They get shortened with all the slumping I do and need to be stretched back out so that I can stand up straight.

My feet are messed up too, but I feel it in my lower back more than the feet.

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Evoir Posted 15 Nov 2011 , 2:39am
post #40 of 41

That's exactly right. I would say 90% of all chronic shoulder problems are caused by overuse injuries in the plane of activity - for pretty much everyone that is from waist hight to just over shoulder height. We stoop, roll our shoulders forward and the muscles in the front (pectorals, biceps) become short and tight. We get concurrent lengthening and weakening of the posterior shoulder muscles like rhomboids and trapezius muscles as well as upper back extensors. That places the rotator cuff at a mechanical disadvantage, which will increase wear ON the tendons and the tendon sheath. Treatment basically is stretching pecs, biceps, and actively eliciting muscle contraction and strength in the back component. Even actively depressing (lowering and pressing your shoulders downwards) and externally rotating your arms (imagine holding a tin of soup in your hand, keep your elbow in and rotate your forearm outwards to your side) will help you get used to the idea of better shoulder posture. For cake decorators I recommend (as your PT suggested) what we call "pause gymnastics"...pausing every hour for 5 minutes to stretch your back, shoulders and neck (including rotating side to side). I also like posture checks: when you stand with your arms by your side, your thumbs should be facing forward. Bad posture? You see that everywhere - thumbs are rotated inwards, so you see the backs of people's hands in this resting position (arms by side). When you correct your back and shoulder posture, you will notice that thumb moving to face forwards.

I should write a book about this stuff! Haven't practised for several years due to health problems (PT is heavy work, especially when working with sports people and armed service men and women). Cake decorating presents a whole new type of aching, but its a lot easier than PT.

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augurey Posted 16 Nov 2011 , 9:24pm
post #41 of 41

Thanks again everyone for the input.

My feet are still swollen to about twice their size, but thankfully the Advil (suggested by my doctor) has been allowing me to walk normally almost (but not quite) pain-free.

Hopefully soon enough I'll be completely back to normal (and won't get anymore comments from old ladies passing me on a walker asking me where my walker is and that I should get one through Medicare...).

I bought my first pair of compression knee hi's. Really good shoes and a mat will come in time when I can afford them; but I at least have a good pair of day-to-day shoes and the knee hi's that should get me through a bit (with lots of sitting breaks).


Now I just have to wait for the swelling to go down enough for me to be able to get my feet into a normal pair of shoes (I'm still stuck with slip on's).

Definitely learned a lot from this experience and don't particularly care to repeat it (if I can avoid it).

Thanks again icon_smile.gif

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