Freezing Cakes Prior To Decorating

Decorating By Pimples25 Updated 9 Oct 2006 , 9:58pm by fearlessbaker

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Pimples25 Posted 9 Oct 2006 , 9:35am
post #1 of 14

I need a bit of advice please, can you tell me the best way to freeze a cake so that it defrosts and doesnt taste dry or anything. Ive got quite a few cake orders coming up and it just means Im gonna be getting home from work and having to make cakes and decorate them ready for people the following day. Im worried about freezing cakes in case they end up dry or just tasting horrible. I know some people have mentioned sugar syrup, what does this do and should you put this on the cake before or after its been frozen and defrosted, also how do you apply it, brush it on or pour it on. Can you fill the cake before freezing, I tend to use Jam as a filling as everyone seems to like this. Ive been told you can decorate a cake with butercream icing while the cake is still frozen but is this also the case for fondant icing. Sorry I know Ive got lots of questions but if I can master this freezing bit itll make things a lot lot easier for me. I tend to use mainly Madeira cakes, not sure what theyre called in America or whether they are the same. Any advice would really be appreciated.

13 replies
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aliekitn99 Posted 9 Oct 2006 , 10:06am
post #2 of 14

If you wrap your cakes very well you shouldn't have any problems with taste or dryness. I have frozen many of my cakes and not had any problems. Just make sure you let them come up to room temp before icing your cakes or you may have trouble getting your BC to stick.

Wishing you the best,
aliekitn99

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indydebi Posted 9 Oct 2006 , 10:42am
post #3 of 14

I pulled a cake out of my freezer last week that had been in the freezer for just over a month. I had just saran-wrapped it and put it in the freezer the day I baked it. I pulled it out because I thought it had been in there too long so I was going to let my family eat it (save the GOOD cakes for the customers!) icon_biggrin.gif I let it thaw completely and when I unwrapped it, I was so thrilled to discover that it was as moist and fresh-tasting as the day it was baked! I expected some dryness and some "been in the freezer for awhile" taste. I was truly surprised ..... and very thrilled! i honestly could not taste a difference!

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praetorian2000 Posted 9 Oct 2006 , 1:15pm
post #4 of 14

I wrap mine in plastic wrap and then let them freeze as solid as possible. Afterwards, I wrap them tightly in foil and return them to the freezer. I have had cakes in their for 3 months and they come out moist and tender.
I just took a cake decorating class and the instructor--a professional cake decorator--said cakes are more moist, more tender, and better tasting after having been frozen. And she said the way I freeze my cakes is the exact same thing she does.

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jtb94 Posted 9 Oct 2006 , 1:25pm
post #5 of 14

I freeze my cakes. I put them on a cardboard, let them cool, then wrap at least three times with plastic wrap, then I put them in a plastic grocery store sack. When I need the cake, I get it out, let it thaw for a few hours, unwrap and decorate. Once I tried to decorate a cake frozen. It didn't work for me. I couldn't get the BC to crust enough for me to smooth it out.

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Pimples25 Posted 9 Oct 2006 , 1:59pm
post #6 of 14

Thanks for all your replies, so does anyone use sugar syrup or do you find you don't need to?

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aliekitn99 Posted 9 Oct 2006 , 2:28pm
post #7 of 14

You don't need to use the sugar syrup.

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Tkeys Posted 9 Oct 2006 , 3:33pm
post #8 of 14

I also like to freeze them while they are still a bit warm. I find that it traps a bit more moisture inside, and it makes them even better and keeps them from getting dry. Actually, i prefer the taste of my cakes when I freeze before decorating if i have frozen them while they are warm - they are much more moist. I wrap them in plastic wrap (actually, my new obsession is the glad press and seal). I let them cool a bit, flip them out onto a cooling rack, then wrap them in the plastic wrap, then I cover the plastic wrap (or the press and seal) in tin foil, then pop them in the freezer). You have to make sure you lay them flat in the freezer - or on a cookie sheet or cooling rack - so they freeze flat.

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fearlessbaker Posted 9 Oct 2006 , 3:49pm
post #9 of 14

I make sure my cakes have totally cooled and then place them in the freezer unwrapped till they are frozen solid and then use my nify vacuum system to seal them. Works great. Last week on another site there was a post about freezing cakes while warm. The conclusion is that it is unsafe because it causes food borne illnesses. I tried looking for the thread but didn't have time to search it out. Sorry

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Tkeys Posted 9 Oct 2006 , 4:03pm
post #10 of 14

I didn't see that post, but bacteria/mold cannot grow in the freezer because the temperature is not conducive to mold/bacteria growth. Indeed, one of the reasons you first bake things at high temperatures and then immediately freeze them is to kill off germs and then prevent re-growth, because room-temperature is when bacteria and mold are most likely to thrive and grow.

Regardless . . . people have different techniques for doing things - properly wrapped cakes can be frozen without causing freezer burn.

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fearlessbaker Posted 9 Oct 2006 , 9:15pm
post #11 of 14

I totally agree that everyone has their own technique for doing things and that is what is so wonderful about the process of baking. It is a never ending journey of learning. If you would like to learn more about this topic and where I learned this please go to www.baking911asksarah.com and in her search engine type refrigerating frostings. I think it is the 12th post(indicated on the right side of the post) that talks about freezing warm cakes. The posts before that go into great detail about freezing frostings etc.

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Cakelady232 Posted 9 Oct 2006 , 9:23pm
post #12 of 14

Freezing is great. Wrapped tight in Saran. No dryness. Forget the sugar syrup....reserve that for a genoise or dry cake.

defrost before frosting or the buttercream will not stick.

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Tkeys Posted 9 Oct 2006 , 9:32pm
post #13 of 14

If you read the following post carefully, it says that wrapping up warm products in plastic and setting aside on a shelf for cooling is not safe (which is true). It also states that the practice of wrapping in plastic and freezing may increase the condensation upon defrosting and may have an impact on long-term shelf stability . . . this is only important if you need cakes to be shelf-stable long term upon defrosting. I serve my cakes within a day or two upon defrosting, or keep refrigerated.

So . . . in short, I'd say be careful about how you share information. There is some good information in the link you provided, but it does not say that freezing cakes while warm causes food borne illnesses.

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fearlessbaker Posted 9 Oct 2006 , 9:58pm
post #14 of 14

Thank you so much for pointing that out to me. The reason I shared this info was to let all those interested read it and then make their own determinations without any interpretation from me.Thanks Again. I would never want to mislead anyone.

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