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Decorating By countrykittie Updated 30 May 2007 , 2:38am by chocolateandpeanutbutter

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countrykittie Posted 29 May 2007 , 7:00pm
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But, what is the difference between hi-ratio and ordinary vegetable shortning? I made the whimsical bakehouse icing and used ordinary common brand vegetable shortning, but it is greasier then I wanted. So, how do you tell if your brand is hi-ratio? Does it say hi-ratio on it? We only have Crisco and no-name or common brands where I'm from so I don't know how to tell the difference.

Can someone enlighten me please?

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weberm05 Posted 29 May 2007 , 8:29pm
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bump

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weberm05 Posted 29 May 2007 , 8:33pm
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randipanda Posted 29 May 2007 , 8:34pm
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Hi-Ratio shortening is also called emulsified because it contains emulsifiers (duh). Now, I have no idea what it means, but I guess it makes a difference. Used in cake baking it gives a finer lighter texture and in frosting it will keep it more stable. It is designed for pastries and bread and icing and such that have a hi ratio of sugar (thus being called hi ratio). Unfortunately, it isn't really normally seen in an average grocery store. You'll have to check out your local cake decorating/ baking supply store.

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prterrell Posted 29 May 2007 , 8:45pm
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you can buy it at www.countrykitchensa.com

I've never tried it, though.

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hillmn Posted 29 May 2007 , 8:56pm
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You can find it at cake decorating stores or online under various names like Sweetex. It is not meant to be used for baking, it is only meant for icing.

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randipanda Posted 30 May 2007 , 2:18am
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mmmm, you can use it for baking if you want. Some recipes turn out better with the regular shortening, but some, depending on the recipe, are better with the hi ratio. It just depends

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chocolateandpeanutbutter Posted 30 May 2007 , 2:38am
post #8 of 8

I see you are from Ontario. (Hi!) I get it at the Bulk Barn. It's in the section with peanut butter and that kind of stuff that comes in pails. Some Bulk Barns have it prepackaged for you, and some you have to scoop your own.

I've tried it in the WBH buttercream, and it was great. Everyone seemed to love it - very light, not too sweet. Since I've been using the hi-ratio shortening, my icings seem to be less sweet and they are definitely less greasy.

Give it a try - it really does make a difference.

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