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I never realized....EVER - Page 4

post #46 of 72
It was an exaggerated example to make a point. My niece is a pharmacist so I'm well aware. While most pharmacists work for major corporations, some own thier own shop.

I specifically chose cocaine because I am very well aware of some of the drastic measures parents take in difficult times. That's the point!!!! Just because you really need the money doesn't negate the fact it's illegal.

Just to clarify any misunderstanding, I am a CFL business. I bake from my home.

I do not undercut. I'll absolutely do my best to educate those who do CFL, small commercial kitchen, and major companies alike!

www.VeryDeliciousDesserts.com

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Delicious-Desserts/207874222593145

 

It's never "just cake!"

 

You may get a cake for $way to little but you won't get this cake!

Animal
(4 photos)
 
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www.VeryDeliciousDesserts.com

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Delicious-Desserts/207874222593145

 

It's never "just cake!"

 

You may get a cake for $way to little but you won't get this cake!

Animal
(4 photos)
 
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post #47 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by enga View Post
 

 I personally find it terrible that these schools, colleges and Universities take the money to crank out graduates with the promise of jobs in their field when there really aren't any. A perfect case of supply exceeding demand. Now I wish that I hadn't even gone back to school to become a pastry chef. The jobs in this field are scarce and hard to come by because many chefs are making or having their kitchen staff make their own desserts.

 

I must say, CFLs are looking better and better to me. I shouldn't have tried to open a business, kept my savings, took my Bakery Production diploma and moved to Iowa. Happily baking to my hearts content. 

 

Enga - I am not sure where you live, but if you have a degree as a pastry chef, I know there are jobs out there - at hotels, resorts, country clubs just to name a few venues.  But you may have to move to where those type of places are, if you happen to live in a rural area.  I'm not saying there are tons of them, but they do exist.

 

The city I live in has a very successful culinary arts program.  It is at our local community college, but somehow it has gained such notoriety, that it has a waiting list and selective admission process, and runs about $20,000 for tuition.  Most of the students are young with stars in their eyes, and they are discouraged from getting a job in a restaurant while they are in school.  If they saw behind the "curtain" they might decide that being a "chef"  (cooking on the line in a restaurant) isn't all that it is cracked up to be.

 

And about making desserts with existing kitchen staff:  I can guarantee you that most restaurants are just buying ready made desserts from their purveyors.  It is the rare, independent hotel/restaurant/resort that isn't just buying something off the truck, painting the plate, and serving it as if they had made it in house.  The independents are where you could find that pastry chef job. :)

 

Liz

Follow me on my Twitter handle: @Sugar_Iowa

Or on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SugarFineBakedGoodsAndConfections

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Follow me on my Twitter handle: @Sugar_Iowa

Or on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SugarFineBakedGoodsAndConfections

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post #48 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar View Post
 

Heck, if you don't want to turn them in to the health department, turn them in to the department of taxation for not collecting sales tax.

 

tax evasion is how they got al capone and the bad lawyers in The Firm-- i guess bootleg cakers fit in there somewhere ;)

 

just being light hearted but that is true too--

 

then i'm still reading through the thread but i just wanna say, there is not one cfl law of course so pets are not always a deal breaker

 

for example in california 

 

Quote:
 No infants, small children, or pets in kitchen during cottage food preparation

 

http://www.acgov.org/aceh/documents/AB01616FAQs_CCDEH_English.pdf

 

in tennessee you cannot have pets in the building--so while cfls are similar there are varying details

 

in texas if i understand correctly, they are in the process of writing up some guidelines but other than that it's wide open on pets

 

so it's not necessarily an automatic deal breaker everywhere

the only way to see the rainbow is to look through the rain

 

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the only way to see the rainbow is to look through the rain

 

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post #49 of 72

yes there are jobs out there for those with culinary degrees but they are the same jobs one can aspire to without a degree--there is no difference in pay for those with degrees-- there's no exclusivity-- look at a teaching degree for example--without one you can teach sunday school or something like that maybe teach in a daycare--but with it doors open, opportunities and salaries rise--

 

the only way to make salary/benefit/promotion increases as a chef is to work more hours--because there are thousands of immigrants ready and waiting to do your job faster, often more efficient and for low wages--simple supply and demand--

 

and you and i have a different point of view liz, with all respect, i think it is incredibly self serving of the schools to not want future grads to get in the industry now--for one they will need the speed and they need to realize there is not a financial gain to attending school--

 

sure it helps with confidence and some networking but it is ass whooping work--then have to pay off a school bill making the same money available to non-degreed? ouch 

 

to me, the answer is to balance the front and back of the house financially--spread those tips around especially in the places where wait staff can garner 60-80k--but...my (son) chef got in a different industry all together so he could have a life--and pay the school bill...

the only way to see the rainbow is to look through the rain

 

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the only way to see the rainbow is to look through the rain

 

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post #50 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by -K8memphis View Post
 

yes there are jobs out there for those with culinary degrees but they are the same jobs one can aspire to without a degree--there is no difference in pay for those with degrees-- there's no exclusivity--

 

and you and i have a different point of view liz, with all respect, i think it is incredibly self serving of the schools to not want future grads to get in the industry now--for one they will need the speed and they need to realize there is not a financial gain to attending school--

 

 

I agree with you completely K8 - kids who are in school and go to work in a restaurant see just what you have stated - the same job can be had with or without a degree, and yes, the schools definitely don't want them finding that out before they graduate.

 

But the truth of most jobs in the culinary industry doesn't match what they tell you in school - you don't spend your day planning menus and trying out recipes.  You are just cranking out prep, cranking out food, cleaning up and doing it all over again. :)  The truth just isn't that glamorous.

 

Liz

Follow me on my Twitter handle: @Sugar_Iowa

Or on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SugarFineBakedGoodsAndConfections

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Follow me on my Twitter handle: @Sugar_Iowa

Or on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SugarFineBakedGoodsAndConfections

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post #51 of 72

Another truth not mentioned by culinary schools is the age and *** discrimination that's prevalent in the food industry. I worked in professional kitchens for 20* years and I was always the only female in the kitchen. Sometimes they'd hire a young Spanish female but only to do cleaning, not food prep. It isn't a friendly atmosphere for females....as in many male chefs don't like to hire females and they don't like to promote them either.

 

The second biggest thing they didn't tell you in culinary school enga is that no one hires older women (older than their 20's). A 35 year old is OLD by kitchen standards. By the time your 50 they don't even hire men in kitchens.

 

I don't care to discuss the whys and get into a lot of details about this, but I assure you I know what I'm talking about from experience. Yes, there are exceptions............but that those are Exceptions not the norm.

post #52 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stitches View Post
 

Another truth not mentioned by culinary schools is the age and *** discrimination that's prevalent in the food industry. I worked in professional kitchens for 20* years and I was always the only female in the kitchen. Sometimes they'd hire a young Spanish female but only to do cleaning, not food prep. It isn't a friendly atmosphere for females....as in many male chefs don't like to hire females and they don't like to promote them either.

 

The second biggest thing they didn't tell you in culinary school enga is that no one hires older women (older than their 20's). A 35 year old is OLD by kitchen standards. By the time your 50 they don't even hire men in kitchens.

 

I don't care to discuss the whys and get into a lot of details about this, but I assure you I know what I'm talking about from experience. Yes, there are exceptions............but that those are Exceptions not the norm.

My daughter said that one of her teachers might call me to go speak about cake decorating and food in general for career day. I told her I'd be glad to go in and tell them to run as fast as they can from this industry, but if that's not the message they want they should find someone else!

post #53 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar View Post

My daughter said that one of her teachers might call me to go speak about cake decorating and food in general for career day. I told her I'd be glad to go in and tell them to run as fast as they can from this industry, but if that's not the message they want they should find someone else!

 

:lol:  foreal

the only way to see the rainbow is to look through the rain

 

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the only way to see the rainbow is to look through the rain

 

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post #54 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stitches View Post
 

Another truth not mentioned by culinary schools is the age and *** discrimination that's prevalent in the food industry. I worked in professional kitchens for 20* years and I was always the only female in the kitchen. Sometimes they'd hire a young Spanish female but only to do cleaning, not food prep. It isn't a friendly atmosphere for females....as in many male chefs don't like to hire females and they don't like to promote them either.

 

The second biggest thing they didn't tell you in culinary school enga is that no one hires older women (older than their 20's). A 35 year old is OLD by kitchen standards. By the time your 50 they don't even hire men in kitchens.

 

I don't care to discuss the whys and get into a lot of details about this, but I assure you I know what I'm talking about from experience. Yes, there are exceptions............but that those are Exceptions not the norm.


Add that to the fact that I live in a city that is so segregated it ranked number 1 in the nation. I worked twice as hard for my degree because of my ***, age and race. I didn't expect it to be like that in the culinary field. Being a meat wrapper kinda toughened my skin but it was nothing compared to the kind of discrimination I would  face in the culinary world.

 

After working as a Meat wrapper, CNA, Pharmacy Tech, Health Unit Coordinator, and a Health Food store kitchen bake off clerk/meat wrapper/wellness clerk and still being unhappy, I asked myself, what kind of job would you love to do for the rest of your life? Baking won hands down. So that was the field I chose to go back to school for. Oh what a dumb dumb chicken little........ SMDH. Do I have any regrets? Yeah, some but for the most part it was a great learning experience and a lot of it had nothing to do with baking or pastry arts. Would I recommend anyone to go into the field? No.

post #55 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Godot View Post

What - do you expect a pity party?

We've all had it hard for some reason or another.


No I don't Godot but thank you for posting! Its nice to know I'm not the only one who has had a hard time.

 

God Bless You!

post #56 of 72

I know exactly what you mean. I  studied for 5 years, and used to teach cake decorating... and I see tons of people selling cakes, everyone thinks making a cake is so easy and that anyone can do it. I find my self competing with people that just do it for the fun I guess.... its outrageous how everyone thinks they can beat a pro. its so aggravating... but like you said, they will just get what they payed for: unprofessional, maybe unsanitary results. Don't stoop down to their level, obviously the people who support you and recommend you, know how to tell the difference! Keep on going, and don't sell your knowledge short. :)

post #57 of 72

Culinary degrees are the new journalism degrees. You go in all starry eyed, and 5 years later you realized you screwed yourself.

I was lucky, I had one hell of a ballsy chef for a mother, spoke more than one language, and had a few connections. Just enough to get me into an unpaid position under an amazing pastry chef as a first job after graduating pastry school.
I thought I knew what I was getting into, but being a girl in a masculine French kitchen was unreal. I loved working in a proper kitchen, I miss it like crazy, but man alive it was wild.
I once had a pot of hot caramel thrown at me, thank God for chef's coats.
That was a *job* that having a really good connection got me. Most end up in minimum wage bakeries, or Red Robin's as line cooks, if they are lucky. The majority of the people I graduated with are in totally different lines of work.

 

Pastry school promises are on par with those cartoons of army recruiters telling teenagers they will make big bucks and travel the world.

post #58 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by scrumdiddlycakes View Post
 

Culinary degrees are the new journalism degrees. You go in all starry eyed, and 5 years later you realized you screwed yourself.

I was lucky, I had one hell of a ballsy chef for a mother, spoke more than one language, and had a few connections. Just enough to get me into an unpaid position under an amazing pastry chef as a first job after graduating pastry school.
I thought I knew what I was getting into, but being a girl in a masculine French kitchen was unreal. I loved working in a proper kitchen, I miss it like crazy, but man alive it was wild.
I once had a pot of hot caramel thrown at me, thank God for chef's coats.
That was a *job* that having a really good connection got me. Most end up in minimum wage bakeries, or Red Robin's as line cooks, if they are lucky. The majority of the people I graduated with are in totally different lines of work.

 

Pastry school promises are on par with those cartoons of army recruiters telling teenagers they will make big bucks and travel the world.

 

I was in the restaurant biz then the bakery biz before going to culinary school, and I had to chuckle about the hot caramel.  I've had various kitchen implements thrown at me.  One time a coworker became upset for something-or-other and flung her knife toward me.  Thankfully it clattered to the floor and she was disciplined for it.

 

Most of the people with whom I graduated are no longer working in this field simply because they couldn't afford to.  OTOH those who are still working in the field, including myself, either lucked out with FT food related corporate-type jobs or are lucky enough to still have their own business.

 

I work with a young girl who graduated from high school  a couple of years ago.  She was originally thinking of going to culinary school.  When she learned that everything is not roses, so to speak, she changed her mind and now is going to college for a business degree.

post #59 of 72
My problem with the bootleggers is just crap product. While there are always exceptions to the rule, I just really dislike those chemically based, badly created, overly sweet, full of shortening, too thick fondant, lumpy, bumpy, teetering, tottering, barely edible, made-with-a-licensed-character-on-the-top, cake wrecks. 
 
It makes the profession look bad, and lowers people's expectations. 
post #60 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by scrumdiddlycakes View Post
 

Culinary degrees are the new journalism degrees. You go in all starry eyed, and 5 years later you realized you screwed yourself.

I was lucky, I had one hell of a ballsy chef for a mother, spoke more than one language, and had a few connections. Just enough to get me into an unpaid position under an amazing pastry chef as a first job after graduating pastry school.
I thought I knew what I was getting into, but being a girl in a masculine French kitchen was unreal. I loved working in a proper kitchen, I miss it like crazy, but man alive it was wild.
I once had a pot of hot caramel thrown at me, thank God for chef's coats.
That was a *job* that having a really good connection got me. Most end up in minimum wage bakeries, or Red Robin's as line cooks, if they are lucky. The majority of the people I graduated with are in totally different lines of work.

 

Pastry school promises are on par with those cartoons of army recruiters telling teenagers they will make big bucks and travel the world.

 

Pastry school promises are on par with those cartoons of army recruiters telling teenagers they will make big bucks and travel the world.

 

;-D

You are so blessed, I dream about working under a classically pastry chef or chef, and  French, please, don't make me swoon, heck I would do it for free! They could throw all the pots they wanted I'd just come dressed in armor  for the experience alone. Shoot, I'd love to even be a fly on the wall at the French Laundry. Sigh!

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