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Why did the fondant bulge? - Page 4

post #46 of 63

It just seemed odd to me :roll:  -

So moving to your edges.  In order to get close to sharp edges with fondant your butter cream/ganache needs to be sharp also.  A nice fondant finish begins with a smooth finished butter cream or ganache.  Although I always chill my cakes before putting fondant on, many don't.  Getting sharp corners takes practice and technique.  There are many youtube videos you can access to learn corners.  Your corners appear a little droopy - you can also apply extra butter cream/ganache to fill them out before covering with fondant.   Another technique is called paneling - where you cut exact pieces of fondant, let them set up and apply the fondant that way. 

 

I can't stress enough that learning to do corners by smoothing butter cream/ganache and using two fondant smoothers is a valuable skill, just not one anyone learns overnight :)

 

The elements appear heavy.  What did you apply them with?  I would have either used a thick royal icing or melted chocolate.  You can use freeze spray with the chocolate to apply quickly.

Hope this helped some for the future. 

 

Jeanne

I love what I do and do what I love

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I love what I do and do what I love

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post #47 of 63

95% of white flour is loaded with synthetic ingredients just as bad as dawn's icing--

 

king arthur and white lily flour are not bromated but white lily is still bleached flour--b.l.e.a.c.h.e.d.-- and white lily does not brown as well as the bromated flour--

 

king arthur sells the 'enhancer' on the side thusly:

 

Quote:

And what IS Cake Enhancer, exactly? It's rice starch, polyglycerol ester, and mono- and diglycerides of fatty acids – complicated looking words, but nothing to be afraid of. These fatty acids come from vegetable fats, and act as emulsifiers, allowing fats and liquids to combine more easily. They also serve as stabilizers and texture enhancers. Widely used in commercial baked products, they keep baked goods fresh and soft, and help cakes stay light and fluffy.

  • lecithin found in a lot of chocolate-- lecithin is ubiquitous in tons of food--it is a by product of soy sludge
  • titanium dioxide -- white food color--almost all food color is wonked out wonkiness
  • potassium sorbate a synthetic preservative found in fondant
  • tetrafluoroethene to cold spray our chocolates

 

there's too many synthetics and just plain weird sh*t in use today to be squeamish about it--avoiding them is just about a full time job--

 

picking and choosing the ones you want --sure of course--but we are all using and eating them constantly every day--

read the ingredient label

 

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read the ingredient label

 

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post #48 of 63
Thankfully, us little operations that don't have product that needs to keep fresh for days, can avoid that stuff.
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*Top 100 Designers in The USA, Brides Magazine, 2013*<---little ole' me!
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post #49 of 63

yeah little maybe but slightly famous anyhow

read the ingredient label

 

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read the ingredient label

 

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post #50 of 63

I don't dam my fillings but I do press down on them to make sure the fillings aren't going to compress more while the cake sits around. I don't use sleeved fillings, either, just flavored buttercreams or thin layers of preserves etc, so the fillings don't really need dams. If you don't put super thick layers of filling that can also keep bulging from happening, but pressing down on the cake before icign them really helps.

 

As far as BUTT-r-creme goes, it's basically shortening, confectioner's sugar and artificial flavorings. Nasty.

post #51 of 63
  • lorann oils uses propylene glycol--
  • confectioner's glaze is srsly gross like carmine is gross (the latter used in red food color) both made from bugs of course--

 

gag

read the ingredient label

 

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read the ingredient label

 

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post #52 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by -K8memphis View Post
 
  • lorann oils uses propylene glycol--
  • confectioner's glaze is srsly gross like carmine is gross (the latter used in red food color) both made from bugs of course--

 

gag

 

at least the bugs are natural

post #53 of 63

all i'm saying is we should know what these labels say and what the ingredients are-- regular flour contains synthetics--

 

i guess the bugs start out natural, cakefat, but the red food color formula has been changed constantly for years and years because it is found over and over to be unsatisfactory in some way--so they re-compose it--and it fails again--on & on it goes...

 

propylene glycol can be deemed kosher in some formulations--

 

poinsettias, calla lilies and hydrangeas are most natural and poisonous if ingested--

 

so we all just gotta use our heads on this--

 

my recommendation is read the labels and know what it means--know what you're putting out there in your products

read the ingredient label

 

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read the ingredient label

 

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post #54 of 63
I completely agree with you k8. I like to know what I'm putting in to my body- and I for one don't want to go around eating bugs!! Even bread these days contain some form of hair, I find that disgusting. But for religious reasons I have to know what I'm eating and I don't think it's a bad idea that everybody does alittle research
post #55 of 63

Where is that beating a dead horse image?

post #56 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakefat View Post
 

Where is that beating a dead horse image?

 

 

:lol:

read the ingredient label

 

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read the ingredient label

 

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post #57 of 63

Where the hell is the OP??? LOL

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Debbie - US Army (Retired) --aka "The Cake Sarge"

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post #58 of 63
I can't stress enough that learning to do corners by smoothing butter cream/ganache and using two fondant smoothers is a valuable skill, just not one anyone learns overnight icon_smile.gif

The elements appear heavy.  What did you apply them with?  I would have either used a thick royal icing or melted chocolate.  You can use freeze spray with the chocolate to apply
[/quote]

Jeanne,
Thank you so much for constructive feedback. When it comes to the sharp corners how thin does the fondant need to be to allow for the weight too not droop the corners? I use home made mm fondant. Made out of nothing but marshmallows and powdered sugar, and butter cream is nothing but pure butter powdered sugar milk and vanilla.

My elements were just made out of fondant with exception to the poured sugar. I have only ever used water or melted marshmallow paste to attach.

Everything I have ever done cake wise has been with the thought process of "that looks fun, I wanna try it" a lot of people called me crazy for attempting this cake so early into my cake making experiences :p
post #59 of 63
I bake with white lily flour, for all of my desserts. I never have a problem with browning. I also use swans down.
post #60 of 63
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture View Post


And is this a regular occurrence with your cakes? Are you selling these, and if so, do they look like this before they are.collected and or delivered?

 

*

This Tangled cake was my first fondant cake. Made with Wilton Decorator icing in the bucket and Wilton fondant. No filling, no dam, I did dowel each tier, and chilled them threw most of the process.

 

The snowman cake was my 2nd fondant cake. I was having trouble getting any orders with the higher pricing, so thought I could make my own buttercream and fondant to make them cheaper and get orders. I made marshmallow fondant and buttercream half shortening and half butter. I made it in a rush, and didn't have time to chill it. The marshmallow fondant was harder to work with, really sticky. I didn't use filling or dam, but I did dowel.

 

The store bought fondant and buttercream pricing is about $3.50 per serving and the cheaper way is about $2.50 per serving.

 

Sorry so late on the response, been working 2 jobs, quit the 2nd job recently. I want to focus on the baking :)

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