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Disco Dust - Page 2

post #16 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowflakebunny23 View Post
 

 

Until about 2 (?) years ago, these glitters were sold everywhere in cake shops and food sections of the craft shops in the UK and you would regularly see them sprinkled on cupcakes etc.  Then the issue came up in a national TV show (a contestant used glitter dust and the judge asked if it was edible) and all of a sudden, all shelves were emptied.  The pots said 'non-toxic' on them and so people assumed it was safe to eat...apparently not the case.  Back then, I was just baking for myself and family and I have to say, I used them (and ate it) and I'm still here ;-) but certainly wouldn't do so now.  I have used them for cakes since (to make numbers on birthday cakes sparkle for example) but specify on the order form that these items should be removed before eating.

Here is a link to an article about "GlitterGate":  "Storm in a cupcake: How Miranda star sparked pandemonium after question over 'edible glitter' she used on Great British Bake Off reveals it's 'not to be consumed"

 

Excerpt:  "For years, cake glitter has been sold in pots labelled either ‘edible’ or ‘non-toxic’.Edible glitter is made from starch-based food products that can be digested by the body.   Non-toxic glitter is manufactured from plastic and is not digestible."

 

Excerpt:  "....prompted so much panic among viewers that ‘edible glitter’ has now been registered as one of the top ten food concerns in Britain by the Food Standards Agency."

 
* * * * * * *
 
Snowflakebunnny23~~I'm a hobby baker since 2010 and was SO excited about Disco dust!  LOVED IT!  After reading and researching, I now have about 10 containers that I can't even give away in good conscience.
 
post #17 of 83

Disco dust....when this question comes up I always picture (in my tiny frozen gray matter)  Crayola Crayons and Yellow Writing chalk on top of a cake for decorations,

(like elmers glue) they are NON-TOXIC. :cake:

Of course we all have our limits, but how can you possibly find your boundaries unless you explore as far and as wide as you possibly can? I would rather fail in an attempt at something new and uncharted than safely succeed in a repeat of something
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Of course we all have our limits, but how can you possibly find your boundaries unless you explore as far and as wide as you possibly can? I would rather fail in an attempt at something new and uncharted than safely succeed in a repeat of something
Reply
post #18 of 83
Play-doh is also non-toxic.
post #19 of 83
@Apti - that's the one! I was however very surprised that it was still being sold by some stands at cake international...I think they were the ones with the updated labels but still, makes you realise why people get confused.
Love the name the media gave it, 'Glittergate' icon_smile.gif
post #20 of 83
Apti, it's true, I guess most don't realize copy writers gotta write and bloggers gotta blog. Or they don't get paid. Once you approach it from that angle, it's much each to navigate through the news, yahoo and pinterest. I have found some great recipes on pinterest. But no one can come up with great new recipes constantly. It's a shame they get paid to act like they can.
post #21 of 83

I take issue with those who say that it's up to each decorator to decide.

 

No, actually, it is NOT.

 

There is a "bakery" in my area that is owned by a woman who told her employees that the FDA gave her special approval to use Disco Dust.  One of those employees went to the health department and the HD went directly to the FDA.  The FDA of course said that it is not an edible product, and last year, the health inspectors hand-delivered cease and desist letters to all of the bakeries in our area (including mine).  

 

Even in light of this, I still see local cake decorators, cake ball/pop, cookie, and cupcake people putting this garbage on their cakes, cookies, cake pops, etc. and frankly, I have nothing but contempt for them because they have decided that they know better when in fact, they could be doing great harm to the people who trust them to provide them with safe, edible goods.

 

[WARNING: GROSS ALERT]   My mom and daughter recently went to a Swarovski event (my mom buys a lot of Swarovski), and they were given big buckets of beautiful, sparkly peppermint popcorn.  My mom asked me a few days after the event to take a look at the popcorn because she wanted to know what was in it.  There was a liberal application of Disco Dust and...well...my mom was pretty startled when she pooped glitter.  Unfortunately, there was no manufacturer information on the popcorn.  I wonder what the other popcorn-eating patrons thought of their pretty sparkly poops.  LOL

 

It's just sad that this is even an issue.  So many people are unscrupulous. 

~ Sherri
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~ Sherri
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post #22 of 83

Awww, c'mon now, how bad can it be if it makes you poop glitter? :lol:

 

Can you pm me who that was?   Is that why it was such a big deal in Texas last year? I can't believe I never got the low down! I'm so out of the loop...

post #23 of 83

As an old retired cake decorator I have seen so very many changes in products...But not in what

customers want....They want sparkle for a child's birthday, they want metallic silver for a 25th anniversary, they want metallic gold for a 50th....So back in the day you used plastic pieces that were easily removed. Big plastic silver and gold scrolls or numbers etc.....strings of beads that were removed...

 

Then things changed and the concept of everything had to be "edible".....o.k. that's fine but customers still want silver and gold and glitter etc. Cake shows and contests started using gum paste, gelatin, fondant and actually at first I was told/taught you could use non-toxic artist chalks, scrape them into a power and use that for gum paste flowers..the cake supply companies then came out with the petal dusts/luster dusts etc...And seriously when you do gum paste flowers they are edible but would you sit and eat your flowers????  The big thing is "Wow" these flowers are made from a sugar product..Otherwise you could just use silk ones, right? Cheaper, easier but you don't get the wow of a talented cake decorator....or the pay that an accomplished cake decorator gets for a 100% edible cake....

 

Next the magazines etc started showing all the "bling"....do you use rhinestones all over...No customers and cake shows and contests wanted edible....you make isomalt jems..If you use the 100% edible glitter that is either corn starch or gum arabic you don't the "bling" the customer wants...The cake industry comes out with Disco Dust..I have yet to see a actual complete ingredient list for any of the petal, luster, pearl or disco dusts and even on Wiltons lusters it has a warning on the label because of the mica (pearlescent)...Same with Americolor sheen colors. Theirs are FDA approved but it's the exact same ingredient....Same with pearlized sugar pearls...So what do you tell customers...If you want that look..The sparkle the metallic gold and silver you will be using something that is non-toxic but not edible...It is not a food group...it is like make-up, crayons, play dough etc...Is it going to kill you?  no...should you remove it?  probably....OR we can use ribbon and plastic pearls and plastic embellishments....Or we can use grey as silver, yellow as gold and regular sugar crystals and edible glitter but it won't look like what you want..... It's something I just don't think is going to go away until retro cakes are the "in thing"   The big plastic staircases with the bridesmaids figurines and lots of ribbons and bows or Monsanto can make sparkley corn..:)    Sorry for being so long winded...

post #24 of 83

I'm not sure how I missed this whole thing until now but it has me concerned....I have a client who LOVES LOVES LOVES disco dust and sparkle and bling and disco dust!!!!! Has anyone ever been able to get ahold of an ingredient list for Disco Dust?  Is it really just plastic?  Ewwwww!  

post #25 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomsann View Post
 

As an old retired cake decorator I have seen so very many changes in products...But not in what

customers want....They want sparkle for a child's birthday, they want metallic silver for a 25th anniversary, they want metallic gold for a 50th....So back in the day you used plastic pieces that were easily removed. Big plastic silver and gold scrolls or numbers etc.....strings of beads that were removed...

 

Then things changed and the concept of everything had to be "edible".....o.k. that's fine but customers still want silver and gold and glitter etc. Cake shows and contests started using gum paste, gelatin, fondant and actually at first I was told/taught you could use non-toxic artist chalks, scrape them into a power and use that for gum paste flowers..the cake supply companies then came out with the petal dusts/luster dusts etc...And seriously when you do gum paste flowers they are edible but would you sit and eat your flowers????  The big thing is "Wow" these flowers are made from a sugar product..Otherwise you could just use silk ones, right? Cheaper, easier but you don't get the wow of a talented cake decorator....or the pay that an accomplished cake decorator gets for a 100% edible cake....

 

Next the magazines etc started showing all the "bling"....do you use rhinestones all over...No customers and cake shows and contests wanted edible....you make isomalt jems..If you use the 100% edible glitter that is either corn starch or gum arabic you don't the "bling" the customer wants...The cake industry comes out with Disco Dust..I have yet to see a actual complete ingredient list for any of the petal, luster, pearl or disco dusts and even on Wiltons lusters it has a warning on the label because of the mica (pearlescent)...Same with Americolor sheen colors. Theirs are FDA approved but it's the exact same ingredient....Same with pearlized sugar pearls...So what do you tell customers...If you want that look..The sparkle the metallic gold and silver you will be using something that is non-toxic but not edible...It is not a food group...it is like make-up, crayons, play dough etc...Is it going to kill you?  no...should you remove it?  probably....OR we can use ribbon and plastic pearls and plastic embellishments....Or we can use grey as silver, yellow as gold and regular sugar crystals and edible glitter but it won't look like what you want..... It's something I just don't think is going to go away until retro cakes are the "in thing"   The big plastic staircases with the bridesmaids figurines and lots of ribbons and bows or Monsanto can make sparkley corn..:)    Sorry for being so long winded...

Yup, it's never enough.  Pretty soon they'll want REAL Gold Silver and Platinum like the Kings and Queens of Old. Gold leaf

And I'll still be making booring cakes for small town folks.:roll:

Of course we all have our limits, but how can you possibly find your boundaries unless you explore as far and as wide as you possibly can? I would rather fail in an attempt at something new and uncharted than safely succeed in a repeat of something
Reply
Of course we all have our limits, but how can you possibly find your boundaries unless you explore as far and as wide as you possibly can? I would rather fail in an attempt at something new and uncharted than safely succeed in a repeat of something
Reply
post #26 of 83

;-D exactly....or maybe do contests with what looks the yummiest...

I saw a recipe today for chocolate lasagna that made my mouth water.....oreo cookies, pudding, whipping cream and on and on....to die for...:)

post #27 of 83
Thread Starter 
So I asked a cakepop designer on Instagram and she told me that she uses luster dust for her sparkly-gem pops. I So I ordered some luster dust and behold it looks, nothing like what her gempops looked like. I agree about websites posting pictures of items and you go to make them or it and it never turns out how its suppose to look. I try to always read the comments, but sometimes thats a big fail. Can it be on someones 2014 for to do list, to create an edible sparkle glitter that is safe to eat. lol. I want sparkle, but I dont want any lawsuits stating that I caused something medically wrong with someone, by eating my cupcakes.
post #28 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by dukeswalker View Post
 

I'm not sure how I missed this whole thing until now but it has me concerned....I have a client who LOVES LOVES LOVES disco dust and sparkle and bling and disco dust!!!!! Has anyone ever been able to get ahold of an ingredient list for Disco Dust?  Is it really just plastic?  Ewwwww!  

YES.  IT IS REALLY GROUND-UP PLASTIC.  (or powdered brass)

 

Read the links provided in my post above.  

 

Then google with these terms:  edible glitter?  plastic? and you will get these links and more:

 

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/cupcake-glitter-decorations-unsafe-uk-us/story?id=17445446

 

http://www.food.gov.uk/multimedia/faq/edibleglitter/#.UrMl_SeJ6_h

post #29 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by MBalaska View Post
Yup, it's never enough.  Pretty soon they'll want REAL Gold Silver and Platinum like the Kings and Queens of Old. Gold leaf

And I'll still be making booring cakes for small town folks.:roll:

Actually, from what I've heard, you can eat pure metallic gold safely. . . . but who wants to.

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

Reply

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

Reply
post #30 of 83

Hi, Yes I understand that and have seen these reports....but I have not seen is an actual ingredient

list on a jar of Disco Dust...So I guess what I'm asking is have you seen or been given an ingredient list

on a bottle of Disco Dust or from a company that manufactures it....Or are we to assume that the glitters

they are talking about are specifically Disco Dust....That is what I don't understand.....thanks

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