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Making Edible Glue?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Hi All!

 

I live in the Falkland Islands and have just starting getting into cake decorating.

We have no specialty cake shops here, I'm making a children's birthday cake for this weekend and I just can't find any edible glue anywhere! The whole islands also seems to have run out of Tyclose powder/meringue powder and I'm out of ideas!

 

My mum swears by using Apricot Jam went sticking intricate decorations but I just don't see how that could work?

 

What do you think would be best to use?

post #2 of 9

i'm not sure what you are placing where but white chocolate makes a good glue as well as royal icing--for gum paste glue you can beat an egg white with a little water for glue, piping gel is a great glue too you can even make piping gel--recipe i'm sure is google-able--

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post #3 of 9
I will also point out that literal glue, the kind that woodworkers cook up in a pot, that's made from horse hooves or rabbit skins, or fish bones, is nothing more than gelatin.
Therefore, food-grade gelatin would certainly qualify as edible glue. Whether it would be a useful adhesive for any given purpose, that's for you to determine.

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

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James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

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post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by hbquikcomjamesl View Post

I will also point out that literal glue, the kind that woodworkers cook up in a pot, that's made from horse hooves or rabbit skins, or fish bones, is nothing more than gelatin.
Therefore, food-grade gelatin would certainly qualify as edible glue. Whether it would be a useful adhesive for any given purpose, that's for you to determine.

 

piping gel is basically gelatin plus corn syrup --

 

i facetiously say it is what is holding the great wall up --

 

it's quite powerful

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post #5 of 9

wow--i'm seeing piping gel recipes made with cornstarch--i've only use the gelatin piping gel--and i'm reading here that this author says it stays tacky--

 

idk--if you apply too much it will stay tacky but if it's used right it will just about darn your socks and sew your shoe sole back together ;) if it's left in the air it dries brick hard--jar lids have to be cut off, etc.

one baker's never ever do is the next baker's 'i swear by this'
 
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post #6 of 9

Of course, that also means that when you eat Jell-O, you're basically eating a plate of horse's hooves. Or fish bones. Or some other boiled-down collagen-rich connective tissue. Bon appetit.

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

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James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

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post #7 of 9

or stock--it's tasty, james

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post #8 of 9

You get no argument from me on the stock (although in that case, it's the boiled down bones of an animal I'm presumably already eating). But we must remember the sensibilities of the vegetarians among us.

 

For some reason, I find myself thinking of a recipe that's been circulating on Kauai ever since a hurricane demolished large numbers of chicken coops (it seems that illegal cockfighting was very popular with the locals), and inundated the island with feral chickens:

 

Cooking a Kauai feral chicken:

Boil 3 days in a large pot, with several lava rocks. Then throw away the chicken, and eat the lava rocks.

 

But to get back to edible adhesives, remember: gelatin is glue, starch is paste, milk is loaded with casein, and egg white is albumen, and they're all used as adhesives in non-food applications.

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

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James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

Reply
post #9 of 9

:lol:

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