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FDA ruling could ban shortening with trans fats in US

post #1 of 201
Thread Starter 
Just saw this article...the FDA has announced a new ruling stating that partially hydrogenated oil will no longer be "generally recognized as safe". The impact to cake decorating is that shortening with trans fats would no longer be able to be sold in the US.
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/08/health/fda-trans-fats.html?_r=0

Here is an article to help make the transition to zero-trans-fat baking:
http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/FatsAndOils/FacetheFatsRestaurantResources/Baking-without-Trans-Fat_UCM_303915_Article.jsp

And here is a list of zero-trans-fat high ratio shortening products:
http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/FatsAndOils/FacetheFatsRestaurantResources/Cake-and-Icing-Shortenings-For-Restaurants-and-Bakeries_UCM_304610_Article.jsp
post #2 of 201

Noooooooooooooooo......I need my fatty shortening!!!!!!!!!!!!

Debbie - US Army (Retired) --aka "The Cake Sarge"

Good Cake Ain't Cheap! Cheap Cake Ain't Good!
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Debbie - US Army (Retired) --aka "The Cake Sarge"

Good Cake Ain't Cheap! Cheap Cake Ain't Good!
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post #3 of 201

As long as I can still use butter and Crisco…

 

I think preventing 20,000 heart attacks per year is a good thing, but it's too bad people don't just eat trans fats in moderation in the first place, thus eliminating the need to stop using them altogether.  Stating the obvious, that wouldn't happen…

post #4 of 201
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Norasmom View Post

I think preventing 20,000 heart attacks per year is a good thing, but it's too bad people don't just eat trans fats in moderation in the first place, thus eliminating the need to stop using them altogether.  Stating the obvious, that wouldn't happen…

Normally I would agree, but based on studies the only safe amount of trans fats is zero, so even consuming trans fats in moderation is harmful.

Since zero-trans-fat shortening often contains a small amount of trans fat (under 0.5g can be listed as zero on the label) it's not clear if they will need to be reformulated again to remove it completely.
post #5 of 201

remember how regular coffee was going to kill you, then it was healthy, then it was bad, now it's got antioxidants and it's great.

remember how vitamins were good, then bad, then it was proven healthy.

remember how chocolate was going to kill you, then it was healthy.

 

There may be a  lucrative business in illegal import of Trans-Fat Shortening, a Cake Cartel.....

Of course we all have our limits, but how can you possibly find your boundaries unless you explore as far and as wide as you possibly can? I would rather fail in an attempt at something new and uncharted than safely succeed in a repeat of something
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Of course we all have our limits, but how can you possibly find your boundaries unless you explore as far and as wide as you possibly can? I would rather fail in an attempt at something new and uncharted than safely succeed in a repeat of something
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post #6 of 201

I have read that food coloring is the next thing that they are working on banning, but there are some great natural alternatives, thankfully.

post #7 of 201

They just teased this story on Fox news with the tag "how will all your favorite foods taste when they take the good stuff out - frozen bread doughs and cookie doughs, frozen pizzas, etc."

 

They started with the list of affected foods and I really wasn't paying attention because I was reading this thread!

 

Glad I only use butter right now. :)

 

Liz

Follow me on my Twitter handle: @Sugar_Iowa

Or on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SugarFineBakedGoodsAndConfections

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Follow me on my Twitter handle: @Sugar_Iowa

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post #8 of 201

Following Jason's last link on the products that have 0% trans-fat, I noticed that all of them contain palm oil, which is probably one of the worst types of fat out there.  It's very high in cholesterol. Both my parents and their siblings all had hereditary heart issues; as a result, they read labels like hawks way before label-reading became a national pastime.

 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090502084827.htm

 

(I realize the link is from 2009 but palm oil itself hasn't changed)

post #9 of 201
Thread Starter 
Palm oil is high in saturated fat, but I haven't found any zero-trans-fat high ratio shortening product without palm oil (Cargill made one with canola oil but it is no longer available). The recommendation for saturated fat is to limit it to less than 7% of your total daily calories, while the recommendation for trans fat is none at all.

http://healthyliving.msn.com/diseases/cholesterol/trans-fats-versus-saturated-fats-1

Assume a recipe for 3 cups of frosting calls for 1/2 cup of palm oil shortening, 1/2 cup of shortening is 900 calories, and the shortening is 50% saturated fat (typical for palm oil). The entire recipe contains 450 calories from saturated fat. If you use 1/4 cup of frosting on a cupcake, you are getting 37 calories from saturated fat. The saturated fat limit (7%) for a 2000 calorie diet is 140 calories, so a single cupcake would count for about 1/4 of your daily limit of saturated fat.

A canola-based shortening would be closer to 25% saturated fat, so the cupcake with frosting made from the healthier shortening would count for 1/8 of your saturated fat limit.

Butter is 50% saturated fat so the numbers would be similar to the palm oil shortening.
Edited by jason_kraft - 11/7/13 at 2:11pm
post #10 of 201

Actually, palm oil, being a plant product, contains no cholesterol, since cholesterol only occurs naturally in animals.

 

The strangest thing I see, with regard to fats, is that decades ago, coconut grease (I refuse to call a solid fat an "oil") was considered one of the worst substances you could ingest that wasn't overtly toxic; now, I see it touted as a health food.

 

At any rate, it is also my understanding that there are a number of naturally occurring trans fats that aren't nearly as bad for you as the ones that don't occur in nature.

 

And of course, this thread reminds me of a filthy locker room joke in which the punchline is "Crisco is SHORTENING!"

 

----

 

As to banning food colorings, well, several of them have been banned for decades. Orange No. 1 was banned before most of us were born. Red No. 2 in the 1970s.

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

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James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

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post #11 of 201
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hbquikcomjamesl View Post

Actually, palm oil, being a plant product, contains no cholesterol, since cholesterol only occurs naturally in animals.

Food that itself contains cholesterol doesn't have much of an impact on your blood cholesterol levels, saturated fat has a far greater impact by increasing LDL (bad cholesterol). Trans fat both increases LDL and lowers HDL (good cholesterol).
post #12 of 201
Crisco switched to no trans fat a couple of years ago.
post #13 of 201

I have the good fortune to have cholesterol levels that are both rather on the low side, and strongly balanced in my favor. I'm convinced that the fact that Cheerios are my favorite cereal, and that my usual breakfast when traveling is oatmeal, has something to do with it.

 

And quite right, our bodies typically manufacture more cholesterol  than they absorb from food.

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

Reply

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

Reply
post #14 of 201
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar View Post

Crisco switched to no trans fat a couple of years ago.

no Cake Cartel for me..........so I'm not going to get my cigarette speed boat and Miami mansion?  dang it.

How will the High Ratio Commercial Shortening be affected I wonder. ( if affected at all )

Of course we all have our limits, but how can you possibly find your boundaries unless you explore as far and as wide as you possibly can? I would rather fail in an attempt at something new and uncharted than safely succeed in a repeat of something
Reply
Of course we all have our limits, but how can you possibly find your boundaries unless you explore as far and as wide as you possibly can? I would rather fail in an attempt at something new and uncharted than safely succeed in a repeat of something
Reply
post #15 of 201
Thread Starter 
Every major manufacturer of high ratio shortening has been selling a zero-trans-fat version for a few years now, especially since California banned trans fats in restaurants and bakeries a few years ago. Chances are all trans-fat versions of high ratio shortening will be phased out completely, and everyone will just switch to the ZTF versions.

After we switched to ZTF (Sweetex Z) the biggest difference was that our BC was more temperature sensitive, other than that it was pretty much the same. YMMV depending on the recipe.
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