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covering cheesecake with fondant?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Ok, covering cheesecake with fondant, good or bad?  I am doing a wedding cake and they want cheesecake on bottom layer but they want it covered with white fondant so everything matches.  I was reading everyone's post and started to feel a glimmer of hope.  I saw something about putting it in between layers of cake but had some questions about that like:  Are all parts baked and then put together?  Will the cheesecake smash out when fondant is put on it and leave a bulge? 

I believe someone else spoke about stacking cheesecake to get the right height.  Is there a board and support in between them?

Would greatly appreciate the help.  Getting nervous!

post #2 of 14

Personally, I wouldn't do it.   But every time I put fondant in the fridge it becomes sticky, and just a mess.  I know some other people don`t have that problem.  

 

Do you have an idea of how long they plan on having the cake sit out for?  It would become a food safety concern after a few hours  :sad:    I have no wedding experience other than my own so I have no idea what the norm is on how long a cake sits at room temp.

post #3 of 14

 I was just having this convo with my sister on the phone the other day, if this is not my sister I am sorry, but I think it is! lol. I am starting to think it is not a good idea either, what about modeling chocolate? 

post #4 of 14

First big question - what else is on top of that bottom cheesecake layer?  And how many total layers is the cake supposed to have?  This could be doable depending on your situation.  But personally, I wouldn't put a layer of cheesecake at the very bottom of a multi-layered (let alone tiered) cake even if it were small.  But that's me assuming this is the traditional meaning of a large (tiered) wedding cake which does need supports (dowels, straws, SPS cake system).  Everyone has their favorite...I use bubble straws and plastic cake plates between tiers. 

 

I have made a very tall layer cake that consisted of brownie/cookie/cheesecake layers.  But it was simply iced with frosting - no fondant. And I agree that stacking the two cheesecake layers in the center helped give it stability.  Considering it had heavy layers of brownie and chocolate chip cookie on top it held up very well.  But I did refrigerate it overnight so it was quite firm and took a lot of elbow grease to cut/serve.  This beast weighed in at almost 12lbs before frosting but it didn't bulge; sag; or break,  I suspect having those dense brownie and cookie layers gave it a firm base and sturdy top. You'll notice my layers are much thicker than the original poster though.

http://www.fatgirltrappedinaskinnybody.com/2011/06/ultimate-smore-anniversary-cake/

 

Second big question - do you have refrigeration at the venue?  You can read a lot of varying success/disaster stories out there regarding fondant and refrigerators.  I do have luck with refrigerating fondant decorated/covered cakes and I live in a very humid area and make my own MMF (tends to be softer and quicker to sweat).  If I were you I would definitely let the cake refrigerate overnight at the coldest temp and as long as possible before removing to transport.  I have found that keeping my finished cake in a cardboard box (i.e. clean/new shipping box) helps absorb moisture as the cold cake condensates while coming to room temp.  Depending on how warm it is and what kind of coverage you have (from sunlight) I would say you shouldn't leave it out too long. If you are just setting it up at the wedding and leaving it would be hard to monitor. 

So many varying factors here so I think some more details would help :D  

post #5 of 14

I make them, I will stack 2 2" ones, but not directly on top of each other. I use a board and dowels between.

I use ganache instead of butter cream, and then cover with fondant, and keep it refrigerated.

Don't put the fondant straight onto the cheesecake, which might be obvious, but just wanted to clarify :)

 

It isn't shelf stable, so there is a limited time it can remain unrefrigerated, so keep that in mind.

As far as it being the bottom layer, I prefer a cake to be bottom heavy than top heavy, and properly supported, it bears no weight from the cakes on top at all.

post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks so much! This gives me some ideas to get it done. I do think they are able to refrigerate until close to time, so may only set out about an hour. They only want cheesecake for wedding party so they want a fake cake on top
post #7 of 14

Definitely sounds more doable since it will only be layers of cheesecake and a fake dummy on top.  Good luck!!

post #8 of 14

I've done it quite a few times as well, using the same method scrumdiddly described.

I ususally bake 2 x 2" cheesecakes with a cookie base and bake another cookie-base seperately (blind-baking) to go on top of the second cheesecake. More work than baking just 1 cake, so factor that into your price.

The ganache will make sure you`ll have a nice smooth and firm base which you can cover as any other cake as well

Gotta love ganache, it makes so much possible!! :-)

post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by KateCoughlin View Post

First big question - what else is on top of that bottom cheesecake layer?  And how many total layers is the cake supposed to have?  This could be doable depending on your situation.  But personally, I wouldn't put a layer of cheesecake at the very bottom of a multi-layered (let alone tiered) cake even if it were small.  But that's me assuming this is the traditional meaning of a large (tiered) wedding cake which does need supports (dowels, straws, SPS cake system).  Everyone has their favorite...I use bubble straws and plastic cake plates between tiers. 

I have made a very tall layer cake that consisted of brownie/cookie/cheesecake layers.  But it was simply iced with frosting - no fondant. And I agree that stacking the two cheesecake layers in the center helped give it stability.  Considering it had heavy layers of brownie and chocolate chip cookie on top it held up very well.  But I did refrigerate it overnight so it was quite firm and took a lot of elbow grease to cut/serve.  This beast weighed in at almost 12lbs before frosting but it didn't bulge; sag; or break,  I suspect having those dense brownie and cookie layers gave it a firm base and sturdy top. You'll notice my layers are much thicker than the original poster though.
http://www.fatgirltrappedinaskinnybody.com/2011/06/ultimate-smore-anniversary-cake/



Second big question - do you have refrigeration at the venue?  You can read a lot of varying success/disaster stories out there regarding fondant and refrigerators.  I do have luck with refrigerating fondant decorated/covered cakes and I live in a very humid area and make my own MMF (tends to be softer and quicker to sweat).  If I were you I would definitely let the cake refrigerate overnight at the coldest temp and as long as possible before removing to transport.  I have found that keeping my finished cake in a cardboard box (i.e. clean/new shipping box) helps absorb moisture as the cold cake condensates while coming to room temp.  Depending on how warm it is and what kind of coverage you have (from sunlight) I would say you shouldn't leave it out too long. If you are just setting it up at the wedding and leaving it would be hard to monitor. 
So many varying factors here so I think some more details would help icon_biggrin.gif   
I just want to eat that entire cake you have there. No icing necessary, just hand that over, as is.
*Top 100 Designers in The USA, Brides Magazine, 2013*<---little ole' me!
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*Top 100 Designers in The USA, Brides Magazine, 2013*<---little ole' me!
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
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post #10 of 14

May I stick my fork in there too?  Yummmmmmmmmmm......

There. Their. They're not the same.

 

I hope I die before "your" becomes the official contraction of "you are."

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There. Their. They're not the same.

 

I hope I die before "your" becomes the official contraction of "you are."

Reply
post #11 of 14

I'm gonna die...that looks soooo good!!!

post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture View Post


I just want to eat that entire cake you have there. No icing necessary, just hand that over, as is.

 

Thank you!  That means a lot coming from you.  It was a delicious cake and enjoyed by all.

post #13 of 14
My mouth is watering icon_eek.gif
post #14 of 14

I live in a very humid weather, but I found out that if you want to refrigerate a cake that has been covered with fondant let´s say for over night, and you want to keept it from sweating the next day when you take it out of the refrigerator, you have to put it inside of a plastic bag.  And do not take it out of the bag until it is back to room temperature.  

Arte en Pastel -Cancun, Mexico
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Arte en Pastel -Cancun, Mexico
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