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Serious about: Gluten Free Baking! - Page 3

post #31 of 49
Thread Starter 


OK, have to share. I used my regular yellow cake recipe but used the flour blend recipe from the Simply Gluten book mentioned above. I used it 1:1 what I would use cake flour, and mixed it as I normally would.

SUCCESS.

Besides forgetting to turn my oven back down in my haste and over browning the tops, these are freakin delish. They still have a slight aftertaste but a vast improvement on my former recipe!
post #32 of 49

I bake GF just as a hobby for some friends that need it. I have great success with taking just about any regular recipe, substituting for the flour: 3/4 part white rice flour and 1/4 part tapioca and that's it. no gums etc. BUT the trick is, and you have to do this or it will taste gross, you have to mix the flours with the liquid, or make up the entire recipe and let the batter sit for a few hours. the longer you let it sit, the better the flavor. depending on what the recipe calls for you can let it sit out on the counter or in the fridge. I found that on the internet awhile ago. It works. 

post #33 of 49

My daughter has recently been diagnosed with CD and I am venturing into the GF world with both feet!  This has been a good read and I will be investing into some more experimentation.  Thanks for all the information!
 

Making life sweet!

Lindas Just Desserts

Inspected and licensed commercial kitchen
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Making life sweet!

Lindas Just Desserts

Inspected and licensed commercial kitchen
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post #34 of 49

I realize I don't bake GF often but this thread has peek my curiosity into looking for alternatives to the common gums used in GF baking.   I came across this site on this subject and thought maybe some of you with more experience could chime in with your thoughts.  The Psyllium Fiber caught my eye.

 

http://gluten-free-bread.org/5-alternatives-to-xanthan-gum-and-guar-gum-in-gluten-free-baking

I love what I do and do what I love

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I love what I do and do what I love

https://www.facebook.com/JeanneWinslowCakeDesign

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post #35 of 49

I don't bake gluten-free goods. But I know of somebody who does (I've heard she's very good). Here's a link to her blog.

 

http://sweetnessandbite.com

post #36 of 49
On a related note, the FDA finally approved their definition of "gluten-free" as <20ppm of gluten. If you label or advertise your foods as gluten-free you have one year to make sure you are compliant.

http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm363069.htm
post #37 of 49
Thread Starter 
Jason this isn't in the business thread. Lets keep this to HOW to bake without wheat flour. I even asked that in my 1st post. Thanks.
post #38 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF View Post

Jason this isn't in the business thread. Lets keep this to HOW to bake without wheat flour. I even asked that in my 1st post. Thanks.

No problem!
post #39 of 49
Thread Starter 
thanks friend!

Also, you said sorghum is necessary, why? What does it bring to the party?
post #40 of 49
In our R&D we found that sorghum flour was the closest match to wheat flour in both texture and flavor profile. Oat flour also worked well but there can be gluten cross-contamination issues with oats, so we decided sorghum was the safer choice.
post #41 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF View Post



OK, have to share. I used my regular yellow cake recipe but used the flour blend recipe from the Simply Gluten book mentioned above. I used it 1:1 what I would use cake flour, and mixed it as I normally would.

SUCCESS.

Besides forgetting to turn my oven back down in my haste and over browning the tops, these are freakin delish. They still have a slight aftertaste but a vast improvement on my former recipe!

I'm glad the flour blend worked for you!

post #42 of 49

Hey there!

I pretty much exclusively bake gluten free, as my company is geared toward all allergy sensitive baking.  I've done sugar free, egg free, dairy free, etc., etc.

 

Anyway, My personal flour blend uses superfine sweet white rice flour, tapioca flour, xanthan gum, potato starch, salt and cornstarch.  If you buy the superfine it is really not gritty at all!  I made some petit fours this weekend with one of my favorite pound cake recipes (substituted 1-for-1) and was VERY pleased.  Sometimes I find that I need to add just a little bit of extra fat (butter or oil - never shortening) for that extra fine crumb.  The cornstarch REALLY makes this flour like a 'cake flour' so the crumb is delicate, so if you are looking for more sturdy cake, I would leave that out.  No one (I mean NO ONE) that tastes my cakes, cupcakes or cookies ever guess that it is gluten free, my recipe is that good.  It took me a long time, but all good things do - right?

Tara


Edited by Misstaralyn - 8/4/13 at 8:13pm

Sweet Sammie's Bake Shop

Specializing in Allergy Sensitive Sweets
https://www.facebook.com/SweetSammiesBakeShop

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Sweet Sammie's Bake Shop

Specializing in Allergy Sensitive Sweets
https://www.facebook.com/SweetSammiesBakeShop

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post #43 of 49

One question i have seen gluten free premixed all-purpose and cake flour in specialty stores does anyone know if i can use these as a sub. For regular flour in any cake recipe or if it’s better to find my own mix of flour substitute. I am new to the gluten free intolerance (only been diagnosed intolerant to gluten for two months) haven’t had a cake in that time because all the premade mixes i have found are awfully dry.thks

post #44 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by AshleyCF25 View Post
 

One question i have seen gluten free premixed all-purpose and cake flour in specialty stores does anyone know if i can use these as a sub. For regular flour in any cake recipe or if it’s better to find my own mix of flour substitute. I am new to the gluten free intolerance (only been diagnosed intolerant to gluten for two months) haven’t had a cake in that time because all the premade mixes i have found are awfully dry.thks

 

 

i am very new to wheat free baking--yes you can sub the store bought flours--check the ingredients to see if they contain xanthan or guar gum and avoid doubling up on that in your recipe--i also want to mention that  the big reason to blend your own flours is cost--not to mention as evidenced by this thread--the results--but boy it's a gamble at first huh.

 

as a general rule of thumb gf flours follow the formula  2 parts grain, 2 parts starch,1 part protein--but if you read the ingredients on the different store bought blends they vary greatly from this 'formula'

 

for an all purpose gf flour blend 1 cup each:

  • white rice flour
  • sorghum flour
  • tapioca flour* (jason said that tapioca starch is better)
  • cornstarch
  • almond or coconut flour

 

for a gf bread flour blend :

  • 1 cup brown rice flour
  • 1 cup sorghum flour
  • 1 cup tapioca flour* (jason said that tapioca starch is better)
  • 1 cup cornstarch
  • 3/4 cup millet or chickopea flour
  • 1/3 cup instant mashed potatoes flakes

 

xanthan gum has been used for over 40 years to thicken and stabilize--it is made by fermenting a carbohydrate--usually corn syrup and it is a chain of sugars called polysaccharides--

 

i like gf recipes that eliminate flour altogether or use it incidently

 

jason, i am hoping you will comment on this post and give some guidance--thanks

the only way to see the rainbow is to look through the rain

 

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the only way to see the rainbow is to look through the rain

 

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post #45 of 49

jason, i am hoping you will comment on my post and give some guidance--thanks

the only way to see the rainbow is to look through the rain

 

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the only way to see the rainbow is to look through the rain

 

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