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Box Mix or Scratch for start up small business - Page 7

post #91 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by gatorcake View Post

 

Why is this supposed to be something that works in favor of those who use box mixes?  It really does not do them much of a favor.  The argument is not scratch is greater than all--that no matter how poor a scratch cake is, it will always better better than a box mix.  Maybe there are some, what were they called, "militant" scratch bakers that will hold this view, but those individuals will just look ridiculous.  

 

A well made box cake is better than a poorly made scratch cake?  And?  Taco Bell is better than burned food from a restaurant that is claiming to serve authentic Mexican cuisine, that means nothing when that restaurant cooks the food perfectly, using the freshest ingredients.  McDonald's apple "pie" will taste better than poorly prepared pies from the local bakery, it is no contest when that bakery bakes their pies using a well made-crust and fresh apples.  

 

The point is this--justifying the quality of a product by comparing it to a poorly prepared product does nothing for those that bake from a box.  Because by not insisting on the quality--that they are as good, if not better, you already concede the point to "militant scratchers" that believe when all else is equal box based cakes (even those that are doctored) are simply inferior.   Thus people who bake from boxes should never endorse this idea because when it comes down to it those arguing that scratch > box are presuming that they are well-prepared not poorly prepared.

That was...awesome.

*Top 100 Designers in The USA, Brides Magazine, 2013*<---little ole' me!
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*Top 100 Designers in The USA, Brides Magazine, 2013*<---little ole' me!
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Reply
post #92 of 113

Again like I said, I made a grooms cake for a wedding mine was boxed , the wedding cake was scratch.  Two of the four tiers were left from the wedding cake because it tasted awful and my cake was completely gone by the end of the day.  All I am saying is that my costumers prefer box.  There is no right or wrong on how the cake is made as long at the person ordering it is happy.

post #93 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by gatorcake View Post

Why is this supposed to be something that works in favor of those who use box mixes?

I think the point is that it's easier to get consistent results from a box mix. Baking from scratch requires a different skill set and a deeper understanding of the chemistry behind baking, so it's easier to create a poor quality scratch cake than it is to create a poor quality cake from a box mix (as long as you follow the directions).

On the other hand, this consistency also makes it more difficult to take a box mix cake to the next level and create a truly differentiated product.
post #94 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by texas_mom View Post

Again like I said, I made a grooms cake for a wedding mine was boxed , the wedding cake was scratch.  Two of the four tiers were left from the wedding cake because it tasted awful and my cake was completely gone by the end of the day.  All I am saying is that my costumers prefer box.  There is no right or wrong on how the cake is made as long at the person ordering it is happy.

The only conclusion you can reliably draw from that anecdote is that your customers don't like awful cake.
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post #95 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft View Post


I think you are confusing the issue by bringing freezing into this. If you bake a cake from scratch (the ingredients of which come from a factory BTW) and then freeze it, you can thaw it later and the quality will be just as good if not better, assuming the recipe can stand up to freezing of course.

We made our cakes from scratch by necessity, since we had to develop custom recipes for customers with various allergies. However, to save time we put together our own gluten-free mix using rice flour, sorghum flour, tapioca starch, and xanthan gum which we stored in bulk. Do you consider that baking from scratch or from a mix?

I think the real issue is the ingredients used in the recipe, not necessarily where in the supply chain said ingredients are combined or the specific production process being used by the baker.

I'm not confusing anything you are the one concentrating on the freezing part. It has no relevance in my example. My point is that you can't buy something already made, alter it and call it custom. It is not in my opinion.

 

Yes I do consider that scratch baking you still have to develop the recipe know how the ingredients interact with each other, measure etc. Just because you make it in bulk doesn't alter that. You're not opening a box adding vanilla extract or pudding and calling it custom.

 

As much as I love a good debate I don't consider this back and forth with you to be one. I've stated my opinion. You've stated yours. I won't engage any further.

 

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Don't aspire to make a living, aspire to make a difference.

 

 

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post #96 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by j92383 View Post

Yes I do consider that scratch baking you still have to develop the recipe know how the ingredients interact with each other, measure etc. Just because you make it in bulk doesn't alter that. You're not opening a box adding vanilla extract or pudding and calling it custom.

Makes sense. For a time we were selling our flour mix (which involves combining four ingredients that have already been processed by someone else), am I correct in assuming that you would consider anyone else who purchased it to be working from a mix? What about if they purchased a recipe that detailed the correct proportions of the four ingredients so they could create the mix themselves?
post #97 of 113

I have come to the conclusion that for myself I do not care so much for the baking part of the process but rather the decorating and the artistic part of the making of the cake.  Muy cake are more  about presentation and the wow ! factor and my customers know that and they are satisfied with box mix and the pretty out come of it all.

post #98 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by as you wish View Post

Anna, I don't know what to tell you. I'm not offended; you amuse me tremendously! I don't have a lot to say about different fondants because there are not many options available where I live. Any recipe for making it myself involves gelatin (Ew, yuck, gross, gross!) and the other options for purchase are Wilton (bleck!), Virgin Ice (also bleck!), some "kiddie approved" multiple-fruit flavoured junk that really, really reminds me of fruit-scented play doh, and a store brand. Given those options, I choose Satin Ice. I buy their "buttercream" flavour, not the vanilla. When I get it, it smells really good. And I don't have a defective nose! If it gets old, yes, it absolutely smells disgusting. I have a container of leftover pieces that have been coloured and worked with for my son to practice with. That container smells unbelievably bad to me! But when it is fresh, it is nice.
I don't expect we are going to agree on this. I don't really care; I find the discussion interesting. I have nothing to gain or lose by who likes or doesn't like Satin Ice fondant! I do wonder though, is it possible you have only ever managed to get your hands (and mouth and nose) on old product?

 

I think it is very likely I have only tried old product, since I tried some at the bakery I used to work, a friend had some we worked on a cake together with, and she had gotten it on clearance, and I ordered some from the bakery supply I use... But, I can't imagine it being much better, then tasting that bad, when there is no dairy in it... IDK. I have no desire to waste my money on any, ever again, since I had bought a 5 pound bucket for $30 and threw it all away. I had it at a wedding before, too. NASTY cake, nobody at our table at it, it was from scratch and tasted like flour with a little sugar in it. DRY, and horrible.
Beginners, be sure to parrot advice and get your post count up as fast as you can. After all, it's not what you know, it's what people THINK you know.
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Beginners, be sure to parrot advice and get your post count up as fast as you can. After all, it's not what you know, it's what people THINK you know.
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post #99 of 113
I bake from scratch. I don't like boxed or store-bought cakes. If I were a client, and I paid $800 for a wedding cake, I'd be pretty ticked to learn my cake was made from a box mix. Baking is an art, and I think it's an art worth learning if one wants to sell his products in the custom cake business.

I guess I'm a snob because I think buttercream should contain actual butter, too.
post #100 of 113

today I delivered a cake. I used MacsMom doctored WASC recipe for an orange dreamsicle cake. I am friends with the customers so I stayed awhile. While out of the room I overheard "that is the best cake I have ever tasted" And they LOVED the way it was decorated. So my theory is..you do it your way and I'll do it my way. To each his own...live and let live...there are more important things in life to worry about than how someone else is baking their cakes. I am sure everyone of your cakes are delicious. I wish I could taste them all in one big cupcake food orgy...

post #101 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rosegin View Post

I bake from scratch. I don't like boxed or store-bought cakes. If I were a client, and I paid $800 for a wedding cake, I'd be pretty ticked to learn my cake was made from a box mix. Baking is an art, and I think it's an art worth learning if one wants to sell his products in the custom cake business.

I guess I'm a snob because I think buttercream should contain actual butter, too.

I just got my final payment for a $769 cake, and they aren't ticked at all that I use mixes. They were practically licking the plate... Perhaps if they had spent the extra $31 they would angry right? 

 

BUTTERCREAM should have butter in it, all icing doesn't have to, though. Like White Mountain Cream, from Fannie Farmer doesn't have butter in it. It is so light and creamy, and amazing. 

 

I think catering to your customers is pretty important, and mine like my cake. Actually, they LOVE my cake. 

Beginners, be sure to parrot advice and get your post count up as fast as you can. After all, it's not what you know, it's what people THINK you know.
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Beginners, be sure to parrot advice and get your post count up as fast as you can. After all, it's not what you know, it's what people THINK you know.
Reply
post #102 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annabakescakes View Post

I just got my final payment for a $769 cake, and they aren't ticked at all that I use mixes. They were practically licking the plate... Perhaps if they had spent the extra $31 they would angry right? 

BUTTERCREAM should have butter in it, all icing doesn't have to, though. Like White Mountain Cream, from Fannie Farmer doesn't have butter in it. It is so light and creamy, and amazing. 

I think catering to your customers is pretty important, and mine like my cake. Actually, they LOVE my cake. 
Do you doctor your mixes? Wasc? I'm just curious I haven't eaten a scratch cake since I was a child and my mother didn't have time to teach me how to bake from scratch so now I'm afraid to try, perhaps one day when I'm feeling very zen I will .
post #103 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annabakescakes View Post

I just got my final payment for a $769 cake, and they aren't ticked at all that I use mixes. They were practically licking the plate... Perhaps if they had spent the extra $31 they would angry right? 

 

BUTTERCREAM should have butter in it, all icing doesn't have to, though. Like White Mountain Cream, from Fannie Farmer doesn't have butter in it. It is so light and creamy, and amazing. 

 

I think catering to your customers is pretty important, and mine like my cake. Actually, they LOVE my cake. 

I understand where you are coming from.  Everyone I bake for I tell them upfront that I use box mixes and they are ok with it.  As long as it taste good and especially if it looks good they are satisfied.  Like I said before as long as the costumer is happy it is all good.  Baking, decorating, etc. I see as an art form and we all have different techniques to express our talents.

post #104 of 113

WASC stands for "White Almond Sour Cream" it is a doctored boxed cake mix recipe and is a dense but moist cake batter that often used when baking.  I used the recipe today.  I made leopard printed cupcakes (the prints were inside the cupcake).  I could not have done the prints with a thinner batter.

post #105 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by gatorcake View Post

Why is this supposed to be something that works in favor of those who use box mixes?  It really does not do them much of a favor.  The argument is not scratch is greater than all--that no matter how poor a scratch cake is, it will always better better than a box mix.  Maybe there are some, what were they called, "militant" scratch bakers that will hold this view, but those individuals will just look ridiculous.  

A well made box cake is better than a poorly made scratch cake?  And?  Taco Bell is better than burned food from a restaurant that is claiming to serve authentic Mexican cuisine, that means nothing when that restaurant cooks the food perfectly, using the freshest ingredients.  McDonald's apple "pie" will taste better than poorly prepared pies from the local bakery, it is no contest when that bakery bakes their pies using a well made-crust and fresh apples.  

The point is this--justifying the quality of a product by comparing it to a poorly prepared product does nothing for those that bake from a box.  Because by not insisting on the quality--that they are as good, if not better, you already concede the point to "militant scratchers" that believe when all else is equal box based cakes (even those that are doctored) are simply inferior.   Thus people who bake from boxes should never endorse this idea because when it comes down to it those arguing that scratch > box are presuming that they are well-prepared not poorly prepared.

I think you missed my point. I wasn't speaking in favor of either side with that statement. My post came after texas_mom who said her clients thought her scratch cakes were awful (or something to that effect) and she said she would go back to her box mixes. My response pointed out that scratch baking is not for everyone. If box is what you do best, have at it. It'll turn out better than your "awful" scratch cakes.

Here's my point spelled out: Many complain that scratch cakes are inherently dry or awful or this or that. I believe it's because those folks DON'T know how to bake from scratch. As a card-carrying Militant Scratch Baker who not only bakes from scratch but creates and develops great scratch recipes from scratch (and I say this with all humility), I get irritated when scratch cakes get a bad rap because the baker quite simply sucks at scratch baking. So I say if your box cakes are great and your customer loves them, THAT box cake is better than a sorry attempt at scratch baking a.k.a poorly-made scratch cake so stick with the box or learn how to bake from scratch. I hope I've cleared that up well enough.
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