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Is buttercreme icing "unprofessional?" - Page 2

post #16 of 30

Personally I would love to do more butter cream only cakes! SMBC is a beautiful thing when you use good vanilla, and you can see all the pretty specks from the seeds and whatnot. I won't color my SMBC past pastel shades, so I'm limited to the design options, but I love a good bc only cake. I developed a method of carving it awhile back actually, and love doing that. 

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post #17 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by lunawhisper0013 View Post

As I have said in my previous thread, I am very new to this site, and in many ways, to the cake community at large. I have posted several of my favorite cakes here and I have gotten good responses on many of them but there is a recurring theme among the comments.

 

"I can't believe that is buttercreme"

"I can't imagine doing that cake in buttercreme"

"I wish I could do something like that in buttercreme"

and so forth...

 

I started in a grocery store and so am most comfortable with the buttercreme icing.  I use fondant on occasion but mostly just for decorative accents and never to fully ice the cake.  Most of my clients tell me that they don't like the taste of fondant, but fondant seems to be the universal standard for "professional" cakes. 

 

I like to think outside of the box and have a background in art and drawing which had helped me greatly with my piping skills and my ability to sculpt buttercreme icing. This is what I do everyday but on here, 3D and elaborate themed cakes in buttercreme seem like extremely foreign concepts.

 

So, long story short, is buttercreme icing largely considered a grocery store or armature icing in the world of "professional" bakeries and decorators?

I think what they are saying it the decorator is so good that they can make buttercreme look as smooth as fondant.

post #18 of 30
Thread Starter 
@AZCouture

What do you do to carve it? You have me curious...unless it is a trade secret. I understand that too icon_smile.gif
post #19 of 30

I am an amateur but in my opinion I think it cakes more skill to get a really polished finish with buttercream than it does with fondant. I say this because I can make a decent looking cake with fondant but most certainly couldn't with fondant. I just think fondant is more forgiving. TBH most people I know (myself included) pick the fondant off a cake to actually eat it. 

post #20 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by niniel1 View Post

I am an amateur but in my opinion I think it cakes more skill to get a really polished finish with buttercream than it does with fondant. I say this because I can make a decent looking cake with fondant but most certainly couldn't with fondant. I just think fondant is more forgiving. TBH most people I know (myself included) pick the fondant off a cake to actually eat it. 

since I have started flavoring my MMF with Lorann flavorings I am noticing people eating it more often than not! (you would think that I am a paid advertiser for Lorann...lol)

 

As for Bettercream, Pastry Pride or dreamwhip I can't find it icon_cry.gif

post #21 of 30

To me certain styles of cake look better in buttercream and others look better in fondant.  A buttercream cake where the icing is intensely colored looks less professional to me fwiw

post #22 of 30

I think when people say buttercream cake, they think of very dated styles of decorating.  Big buttercream roses, shell borders, etc etc.  When someone (like yourself) is very good at using buttercream, people probably assume it's fondant.  There are amazing  (and professional!) things that can be done with buttercream by those that are very skilled.  Perhaps some of cake world just needs a lesson in what really is possible with buttercream!

 

As a side note, most of my cakes are requested with my home made MMF fondant.  I've found fondant, at least MMF, tastes very different when freshly made.  Even 24 hours after being made it has lost some of the flavor and the texture changes, but the fondant I use to cover my cakes is usually made right before I put it on, or not more than a few hours before I put it on.  I know most people let their fondant rest, and I wonder how much that affects what people think of it when they eat it.  

 

I am always trying to convince customers to go with a buttercream design.  I've actually considered running a promotion to discount buttercream ruffle or petal style cakes so I can do a few of those!  

post #23 of 30
I try to roll my fondant (mmf) as thin as possible and I've yet to see anyone pick it off, it has usually all but melted in to the buttercream.
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post #24 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by kikiandkyle View Post

I try to roll my fondant (mmf) as thin as possible and I've yet to see anyone pick it off, it has usually all but melted in to the buttercream.


Yes, this would help. :)  I've seen where people roll it 1/4" thick (yuck) to cover their cake.  Looks terrible when they cut into it.

 

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post #25 of 30

Luna, I don't believe I have commented on any of your cakes, but If I had said something along those lines, it would have been out of envy, not a criticism. Buttercream, regardless of its ingredients, is more difficult than fondant, that is, unless you just smear it on like I was taught back in the dark ages. Smooth buttercream is my biggest challenge. Your cakes are beautiful!

post #26 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carrie789 View Post

Luna, I don't believe I have commented on any of your cakes, but If I had said something along those lines, it would have been out of envy, not a criticism. Buttercream, regardless of its ingredients, is more difficult than fondant, that is, unless you just smear it on like I was taught back in the dark ages. Smooth buttercream is my biggest challenge. Your cakes are beautiful!


This: nodding:  Working with fondant is much more forgiving than buttercream.  Buttercream demands a certain "hand" to execute well, IMO, and not everybody can do it well.  Fondant, OTOH, is much more user-friendly.

post #27 of 30

Buttercream is not unprofessional. Neither is fondant or any other icing that one chooses to use on a cake. As long as it looks and taste good that is what matters. It is the execution of the fondant or buttercream that makes it look professional or unprofessional. Yours look very professional. People are just in awe and shock that yours are buttercream because they are done exceptionally well. I wished my buttercream skills were like yours. I need a ton more practice.

 

What kind of buttercream do you use? 

 

Also, I know that a lot of people don't like the "fake" buttercream, but it has its place. If someone wants a "buttercream" icing and it is in the heat outside then the fake buttercream is the one to use and not the real buttercream. 

post #28 of 30
Thread Starter 
Well, being a store decorator as my day job, I use the "fake" buttercream quite a bit. I tried some other recipies but I didn't like the way they crusted up so I just stuck with what I knew.

And thank you very much for the compliments. It is nice to hear those kind of things from people who are peers in the business and really know what they are looking at vs someone who just walks in the store and wants a "pretty" cake.
post #29 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by lunawhisper0013 View Post

Well, being a store decorator as my day job, I use the "fake" buttercream quite a bit. I tried some other recipies but I didn't like the way they crusted up so I just stuck with what I knew.

And thank you very much for the compliments. It is nice to hear those kind of things from people who are peers in the business and really know what they are looking at vs someone who just walks in the store and wants a "pretty" cake.

If crusting up is the problem, up the fat content in it. (Butter, shortening, whatever you are using)

post #30 of 30

Quote:

Originally Posted by ReneeFLL View Post

Buttercream is not unprofessional. Neither is fondant or any other icing that one chooses to use on a cake. As long as it looks and taste good that is what matters. It is the execution of the fondant or buttercream that makes it look professional or unprofessional. Yours look very professional. People are just in awe and shock that yours are buttercream because they are done exceptionally well. I wished my buttercream skills were like yours. I need a ton more practice....

Yes, precisely .

And when you see tubs of Fondant on your local grocery store shelves beside the boxed cake mixes, you'll know that the general public are giving up shortening based buttercream for fondant.  Hasn't happened yet.  Keep up the good work.

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