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Cakes didn't survive the trip :-(

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

 

I made these cake for a wedding and only the one wrapped in fondant survived the trip in the car. The three tiered cake and the one with the cherry blossoms slid apart. I used dowel rods and supported each layer. What could I do different to keep them from sliding apart?

post #2 of 25

You could try SPS. You can find a lot of info on SPS on this site.

post #3 of 25

Hi, I am so sorry to read about the disaster, but I'm glad that the cakes were still presentable! 

 

What did you fill the cakes with? Sometimes I find that my fruit or custard filled cakes shift a lot if I don't dam them in with BC or ganache.

 

The type of BC I use might also lend to the problem. If I use a softer BC (ie Cream Cheese), my cakes shift so I stick to my SMBC to ice and fill with the cream cheese.

post #4 of 25

Yes, try SPS.  It works wonders.

Answers to the most often asked questions re: SPS. SPS instructions are on Page 15 of the Sticky at the top of the Cake Decorating Forum. Supplies can be ordered from Oasis Supply, Global or BakeryCrafts.
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Answers to the most often asked questions re: SPS. SPS instructions are on Page 15 of the Sticky at the top of the Cake Decorating Forum. Supplies can be ordered from Oasis Supply, Global or BakeryCrafts.
Reply
post #5 of 25
Thread Starter 

Thank you for the comments I will use the sps next time for sure. The cake picture was taken before they were moved. They looked like s___ when they got there. Will learn from my mistake.

post #6 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by terrybiehl View Post
I used dowel rods and supported each layer. What could I do different to keep them from sliding apart?

Each tier.  A central dowel or two (or multiple skewers) hammered through all and into the base board may have prevented them from sliding apart.

post #7 of 25

SPS

post #8 of 25
Please will someone tell me what sps is? I'm delivering a cake on sat and i'm terrified that will happen to me too.
post #9 of 25
Read my signature line, below
Answers to the most often asked questions re: SPS. SPS instructions are on Page 15 of the Sticky at the top of the Cake Decorating Forum. Supplies can be ordered from Oasis Supply, Global or BakeryCrafts.
Reply
Answers to the most often asked questions re: SPS. SPS instructions are on Page 15 of the Sticky at the top of the Cake Decorating Forum. Supplies can be ordered from Oasis Supply, Global or BakeryCrafts.
Reply
post #10 of 25

Were the cakes in the sun in the vehicle for a long time?

 

Was the road very bumpy or the car vibrating a lot?

 

Were the fillings/icings in the cakes "slippery"?

 

All of these things can contribute to sliding.

 

I make sure that the cakes are shielded from sunlight, that the AC is on full blast and actually hitting the cakes, and I put a thick layer of memory foam under the boxes to dampen vibration & bumps.

post #11 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by maybenot View Post

I make sure that the cakes are shielded from sunlight, that the AC is on full blast and actually hitting the cakes, and I put a thick layer of memory foam under the boxes to dampen vibration & bumps.

 Thank you for the suggestion of memory foam under the boxes!  I delivered a cake 2 weeks ago to a wedding in a state park and the curves in the road were bad enough, but the pot holes were the worst!  It seemed like the bumps were shaking the icing off the side of the cake.  

post #12 of 25

In addition to using SPS or bubble straws with two center dowels spiked into the drum, I always transport cakes chilled hard.  And the cakes are very hard because I bake a scratch buttermilk cake that has a high butter content (so the cake is firmer when cold than say an oil based cake or a doctored mix) and the buttercream is hard as well because of the butter content. I shield from sun (even place a blanket or beach towel over the box) and drive like there is an unstrapped newborn in the backseat. I don't care if I get passed--i am going slow and picking my way through a road with extreme pot holes or washboards (a common obstacle here when delivering to ranches). I also always make sure that my cake is level and in the back of the SUV. The back seat is too angled and the floorboards can become very hot if not insulated under the cake. 

post #13 of 25

Ok, neither one made it?? What did you do to those poor things that neither one made it? :( 

*Top 100 Designers in The USA, Brides Magazine, 2013*<---little ole' me!
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
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*Top 100 Designers in The USA, Brides Magazine, 2013*<---little ole' me!
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Reply
post #14 of 25
Thread Starter 
I had each tier supported by dowel rods and I drove a dowel rod down through the entire cake. I did have a jam between the layers and the cake was moist which I think was part of the problem.
post #15 of 25

I hate to say it but all I can think of is that the cakes were not cold &/or you drove like the devil :(  I know all about bad roads. I lived in mountains and cities.   In the 30+ yrs I delivered cakes I can remember only about 3 or 4 that fell apart and boy do I remember how it feels! 

I have often used jam as filling.  I also have said that center doweling gives people false hope/sense of safety.

There have been other threads on how to drive with a cake - I wish I could point them out.  Maybe take the time to search them and pick up some tips that will help in the future.

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