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Someone talk to me about varying whipped ganache firmnesses :) - Page 3

post #31 of 40

I've never worked from a recipe for them that calls for whipping, now that I think about it. 

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post #32 of 40

i think whoever brought up bread had a solid analogy:  you start with the base product of bread (or ganache), then you can do things to that, altering the texture and use:  toasted bread (or whipped ganache).  No one starts out with a recipe to make toast starting with wheat and yeast, it is a treatment that happens. (though there are several breads that lend themselves to a better end product of toast) It is a treatment that has proven quite controversial icon_wink.gif.  Just pass the spoon and I'll help remove the topic from the bowl. 

post #33 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by scrumdiddlycakes View Post


Then they weren't real truffles!

That's what I was going to say! Wait until my blog post tomorrow, I get slightly violent about this topic.

 

AZ, first of all you know me too well becasue I looked for the Devo video and couldn't find a link to the whole thing.

 

Second, how did you make truffles without whipping ganache? Chocolate truffles are basically whipped ganache with maybe some flavorings or butter, depending on the type of truffle they are. If you made truffles without whipping a ganache at any point I suspect a bad recipe!

post #34 of 40

I have also never whipped my ganache for truffles, but if you had premade shells, it would be nice to pipe the whipped ganache in the shells prior to enrobing.

 

My professional chocolate and confections text doesn't have you whip your ganache for truffles.  Depending on if you will be piping or slabbing, you can add more or less liquid, but whipping isn't mentioned for this application..

 

Another great way to use ganache is to whip the air in with a cream whipper, to use on the inside of a bon bon.  You can inject it right into your pre-made shell.

 

Liz
 

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post #35 of 40

It's not just like toast. I disagree. Toast involves a chemical reaction which is non-reversible (google the Maillard reaction). You can heat and stir whipped ganache, then cool it down and it will have lost its air. Whipping ganache is a process of simply incorporating air to lighten its texture. It's lighter in colour but it's very stable, and it's still made of chocolate and cream! 

 

Bluehue - some white chocolate will develop a rancid taste when heated and cooled, like in the process of making white chocolate ganache. It's only a characteristic of particular types of white chocolate. I was merely advising OP to be aware, and thus, be on the safe side when making WCG by keeping it refrigerated. Unless of course one has a tried and true white choc they use with good results. sometimes the fats added to white chocolate can go rancid, just like butter does.

 

And as Mccaulir has added, you can add more chocolate to ganache (and hence, whipped ganache) to increase its firmness, which is ideal in warmer weather. Thousands of Aussie cake decorators can't be wrong! I know it certainly works for me. Just like Bakels market a summer and a winter version of its fondant, I make MY ganaches suitable to weather conditions.

 

The OP was asking about whipping ganache, I was actually answering her question! 

 

Happy ganaching folks!

 

:-)

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post #36 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by liz at sugar View Post

I have also never whipped my ganache for truffles, but if you had premade shells, it would be nice to pipe the whipped ganache in the shells prior to enrobing.

 

My professional chocolate and confections text doesn't have you whip your ganache for truffles.  Depending on if you will be piping or slabbing, you can add more or less liquid, but whipping isn't mentioned for this application..

 

Another great way to use ganache is to whip the air in with a cream whipper, to use on the inside of a bon bon.  You can inject it right into your pre-made shell.

 

Liz
 

Yeah, I'm thinking of the whipped filling. The chefs at my pastry program referred to doing that as a truffle filling, so I was thinking of that. I've made them both ways before, whipped and nonwhipped, but if I'm going to use it inside a cake I whip it good. If I'm making truffles where you use a thick ganache and scoop, then roll in the cocoa, I generally end up skipping the rolled-in-cocoa part and just eat the ganache with a spoon. Just cut to the chase.

post #37 of 40

I was just being a snark about them not being truffles, lol. I have also used recipes that don't require any whipping.

 

 

In any case OP... whether or not people think whipped ganache is real ganache or not, or if it does or does not belong on cake, I use it all the time, as do thousands of other decorators and pastry chefs.

It works like a charm, people love it, and my cakes don't 'squish' out.

post #38 of 40

Yeah, the truffles I make are just hand rolled balls of ganache. Where's Devo?

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post #39 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture View Post

Yeah, the truffles I make are just hand rolled balls of ganache. Where's Devo?

You are so demanding! http://www.iviewtube.com/v/184496/devo-whip-it-(official-music-video-classic)

post #40 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by scrumdiddlycakes View Post

I was just being a snark about them not being truffles, lol. I have also used recipes that don't require any whipping.

 

 

In any case OP... whether or not people think whipped ganache is real ganache or not, or if it does or does not belong on cake, I use it all the time, as do thousands of other decorators and pastry chefs.

It works like a charm, people love it, and my cakes don't 'squish' out.

Yeah, it's very stable. Just like the stable in the video, har de har har har!

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