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Using Push Down method makes a dense cake?

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

I wanted to try the "push down' method where you push down on the top of a freshly baked cake to level it. I then froze the cakes and now when i defrosted it, it's really hard and dense. is it from the pushing down? has anyone else had this happen?

post #2 of 25

I don't know about the hardness, but pushing down on the cake will make it denser. After all, where is it the uneven part supposed to go? Maybe someone can give you advice on the hardness.

post #3 of 25

I too, had tried the "push down"method and yes it DID make the cake more dense. I stopped doing it and am back to leveling the cakes.

We must let go of the life we have planned, so as to accept the one that is waiting for us. Joseph Cambell
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We must let go of the life we have planned, so as to accept the one that is waiting for us. Joseph Cambell
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post #4 of 25

I've never understood the idea of pushing down on a cake to level it. It has to change the density and texture.
 

post #5 of 25

I always wondered why the #$*& someone would push down the top of a cake. That's like mashing a marshmallow down, it would just compress it.

post #6 of 25

It does not make any sense to me either.  If the cake still takes up the same width but less height then you must be expelling the air out of your cake and their goes your lightness.  Level.  Then save your scraps (if you don't want to eat them on the spot) and make cake pops or something with them.

post #7 of 25

I read a suggestion on here a while back about putting something on top of the cake after you tort and fill the cake (wrapped in saran wrap, of course) to help level the cake and to make sure there would be no bulges.  Can't remember who made the suggestion but there was a whole thread about it.  Does that fall into this same category?  I don't remember tasting or noticing any difference in the cake, but maybe that was just me.  You don't put a really heavy tile or whatever on the cake, but something is placed on top of it.

post #8 of 25

Many suggestions on here are not valid. It's like the commercial with the girl and her french model boyfriend...they can't put anything that isn't true on the internet...bon joor!

post #9 of 25
Kara, how do you prevent the cake bulge? TIA
post #10 of 25
Density is mass/volume. If you have the same mass (weight) and smash it down to a smaller volume you will increase the density. Simple physics! After years of testing to find those perfectly tasty and light textured recipes you certainly won't catch me mashing down my cakes. That's why some awesome person created the Agbay. The tile weight is for filled cooled cakes. The idea is to apply a weight equal to the anticipated weight of the fondant to let the filling settle and do its squishing out before putting the fondant on. It's to prevent those unsightly fondant bulges. At least that's my take on it!
I'd rather be baking!
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I'd rather be baking!
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post #11 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sammy09 View Post

Kara, how do you prevent the cake bulge? TIA

You mean the dome on the top of the cake? Lower baking temp usually works for that, but if you level it it doesn't matter if the Statue of Liberty grows out of it while it's baking, you can just cut it off. 

post #12 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar View Post

You mean the dome on the top of the cake? Lower baking temp usually works for that, but if you level it it doesn't matter if the Statue of Liberty grows out of it while it's baking, you can just cut it off. 

Exactly!  Plus, no dome = no snacks!!

I'd rather be baking!
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I'd rather be baking!
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post #13 of 25
Quote:

Originally Posted by Gerle 

 

One would never do this to a Sponge cake of course.

I read a suggestion on here a while back about putting something on top of the cake after you tort and fill the cake (wrapped in saran wrap, of course) to help level the cake and to make sure there would be no bulges.

Yes this is correct... we have been doing it for years with our Mud Cakes...BUT you never ever wrap it them in glad wrap after you have torted and filled the layers... that would defeat the purpose. icon_rolleyes.gif.

Can't remember who made the suggestion but there was a whole thread about it. Most cakers who bake mud cakes do this....  but at the end of the day - each to their own.

 Does that fall into this same category?  No, how could it - sqishing down a warm cake and levelling out a cold filled and torted cake is completely different.

I don't remember tasting or noticing any difference in the cake, but maybe that was just me.  Agree...I haven't  noticed any difference in the taste of a cake after levelling it out with a tile.... You don't put a really heavy tile or whatever on the cake, but something is placed on top of it. Yes, you place a heavy Tile on the top of the cake.... Ceramic tiles are heavy... otherwise there would be no point in doing it.

Many have never tried baking a proper Mud cake - let alone placing a tile on top to level and expel the excess air.....

I would never do this to a Victoria Sponge or Carrot Cake...but for Mud Cakes...most certainly.

Bluehue

post #14 of 25

Does making it dense make it stay together better when slicing and serving?

post #15 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by ctshappy View Post

Does making it dense make it stay together better when slicing and serving?

A dense cake is usually easier to cut = no crumbling.

Another good thing about a Mud Cake, they are always moist.

Bluehue

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