Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cake Decorating › Peer Review Cake Club!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Peer Review Cake Club! - Page 40

post #586 of 762

Karen55 - I was not asking for comments on my work.  I was guoting another poster and replied about her work :)

post #587 of 762

YES I AM IN !

post #588 of 762
I would appreciate feedback! I feel pretty confidant in my fondant skills, but my buttercream cakes tend to look sloppy/rushed. Here are my two most recent cakes
Fondant:
http://cakecentral.com/g/i/3168190/a-traditional-buche-de-noel-a-yule-log-cake-that-took-first-in-a-high-school-competition/

And Butter Cream:
http://cakecentral.com/g/i/3168192/simple-buttercream-cake-for-my-sister-in-law-all-she-wanted-was-a-vanilla-cake-with-something-purple/

Thanks in advance!
post #589 of 762
Well (and keep in mind that I'm the guy who mostly bakes 9x13 single-layer sheet cakes, and serves them in-pan), my reaction to the Christmas cake is a flabbergasted "THAT's a CAKE!?!"

And I'd agree with you on the BC. It looks like it would be perfect if you're actually going for the "rustic stucco" look, but not if you're looking for perfectly smooth. (And when I end up with rustic stucco, it's never been by design.) I'll also say that the pointilistic decorating motif, extending to the lettering, is the best part of it. I'm guessing that "knitting" is the theme. Or maybe some kind of needlepoint. Or some kind of rug art.

There are dozens of different kinds of buttercream, and it's possible to vary the texture just by varying the way the ingredients are mixed. I specialize in a stiff, almost-fondant-like, hand-blended BC, using the recipe that's been on the back of the C&H powdered sugar box since before most of us were born (and variations thereof), but mixing everything with an ordinary dinner fork, rather than a mixer. Other people do various types of meringue BC. Some use all shortening and still call it BC; others say that it isn't BC without the butter.

If one kind of BC doesn't do it for you, try a different kind.

Another thing to consider is that if you trowel a pattern into BC (like the one in most of my cakes; there's a Flickr link in my signature), it usually loses the "rustic stucco" look.

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

Reply

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

Reply
post #590 of 762
Quote:
Originally Posted by hbquikcomjamesl View Post

Well (and keep in mind that I'm the guy who mostly bakes 9x13 single-layer sheet cakes, and serves them in-pan), my reaction to the Christmas cake is a flabbergasted "THAT's a CAKE!?!"

And I'd agree with you on the BC. It looks like it would be perfect if you're actually going for the "rustic stucco" look, but not if you're looking for perfectly smooth. (And when I end up with rustic stucco, it's never been by design.) I'll also say that the pointilistic decorating motif, extending to the lettering, is the best part of it. I'm guessing that "knitting" is the theme. Or maybe some kind of needlepoint. Or some kind of rug art.

There are dozens of different kinds of buttercream, and it's possible to vary the texture just by varying the way the ingredients are mixed. I specialize in a stiff, almost-fondant-like, hand-blended BC, using the recipe that's been on the back of the C&H powdered sugar box since before most of us were born (and variations thereof), but mixing everything with an ordinary dinner fork, rather than a mixer. Other people do various types of meringue BC. Some use all shortening and still call it BC; others say that it isn't BC without the butter.

If one kind of BC doesn't do it for you, try a different kind.

Another thing to consider is that if you trowel a pattern into BC (like the one in most of my cakes; there's a Flickr link in my signature), it usually loses the "rustic stucco" look.

Thanks for the compliments and the input. I'll have to try another recipe and see if that's not the root of my issues. Your icing on the 50th cake is so smooth and glassy! Beautiful!
post #591 of 762

Hi Victoria;

Yes, your fondant Christmas log cake is very well done :)

Your b'cream work isn't all that bad for a beginner.  The dots are well placed, straight and the color gratuation is well done.  What you need to work on is getting your cake iced right :) The over-all icing is to thin (not in consistency but in amount) - there is cake showing through - those dark spots. You need at least 2 consistencies of b'cream - thin to cover the cake and (usually/mostly) medium for decorating.  As another poster said there are many different b'cream recipes.  Here is one of my favorites: http://cakecentral.com/a/2-icing

Some of your dots have 'tips' on them.  This indicatesd you are still squeezing the bag slightly when you lift away so once the dot is the size you want it to be, stop squeezing, count to 3 before lifting the bag away with a comma movement.  If there is a 'tip' that will wipe it away. Most beginners have a problem with this:)

Then the top edge should be smoothed by using the cake spatula to gently swipe the excess icing to the center of the cake.  Also you didn't use any borders.  They give the cake a real finished look.

Another tip:  Make sure to clean up around the cake before you take pictures:)  Later on in your decorating you will rue the fact you don't have a good, clean pic of your 1st work :)

Hope these tips help you better yourself:)

post #592 of 762
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi View Post

Hi Victoria;
Yes, your fondant Christmas log cake is very well done icon_smile.gif
Your b'cream work isn't all that bad for a beginner.  The dots are well placed, straight and the color gratuation is well done.  What you need to work on is getting your cake iced right icon_smile.gif The over-all icing is to thin (not in consistency but in amount) - there is cake showing through - those dark spots. You need at least 2 consistencies of b'cream - thin to cover the cake and (usually/mostly) medium for decorating.  As another poster said there are many different b'cream recipes.  Here is one of my favorites: http://cakecentral.com/a/2-icing
Some of your dots have 'tips' on them.  This indicatesd you are still squeezing the bag slightly when you lift away so once the dot is the size you want it to be, stop squeezing, count to 3 before lifting the bag away with a comma movement.  If there is a 'tip' that will wipe it away. Most beginners have a problem with this:)
Then the top edge should be smoothed by using the cake spatula to gently swipe the excess icing to the center of the cake.  Also you didn't use any borders.  They give the cake a real finished look.
Another tip:  Make sure to clean up around the cake before you take pictures:)  Later on in your decorating you will rue the fact you don't have a good, clean pic of your 1st work icon_smile.gif
Hope these tips help you better yourself:)

Thank you! I will try the technique you mentioned, I was definitely having issues with pointy dots haha icon_smile.gif I know the different people have different techniques when it comes to smoothing cakes, so I think I need to start going through and trying them until I get the right one for me. Also, I should mention, my kitchen was blazing hot when this was made and I couldn't deal with the icing any more. The dots were actually done while the cake was in the freezer and I stood on a chair to ice it... So conditions could have been better to say the least.
post #593 of 762
Sounds interesting, would be interested
post #594 of 762

OK, I just finished a birthday cake for my little grand daughter who aspires to be a chef when she grows up. She wants to compete in a baking challenge--(she has a lot more nerve than I do!) She loves "helping" me in the kitchen, whether I need it or not. I encourage her efforts, although it is a lot easier without, as those of you with children know all too well. She loves my calling her my little chef so that definitely came to mind when thinking of her cake this year.

 

There are a lot of flaws I see in this effort. The table legs are wonky and I'm not at all pleased with the chef's hat, (can't remember the proper name---something that begins with a "T".) The BC border is uneven as the BC hadn't warmed up yet from the 'fridge. I seldom use BC anymore since my hands aren't as steady as they used to be. With a cold bag it was nigh impossible. That's why I am more comfortable with gum paste and fondant.

 

Anyway, here they are and I await your comments. 

 

I tried to use the URL located under the photos rather than posting them here on this post. But it was refused saying that I needed to use the photo's URL--that it appeared I used the page's URL. If someone could help me, I'd appreciate it for the future. I have been successful in the past so don't know what I did differently this AppleMark

 

 time.  Thanks,   Jan

 

AppleMark

If you have knowledge, let others light their candles on it.

Never fear shadows. They simply mean there's a light shining somewhere nearby.
Reply
If you have knowledge, let others light their candles on it.

Never fear shadows. They simply mean there's a light shining somewhere nearby.
Reply
post #595 of 762
It's a damnsight better than anything I could do (not that that's saying much).

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

Reply

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

Reply
post #596 of 762

There is no reason to use UNhealthy wording.  It would have been much nicer if you had said something like": it's a whole lot better than I could have done:.

post #597 of 762

Milkmaid it's wonderful.  Like a party on a cake top.  There's so much tiny detail work.

~~We are living in a world today where lemonade is made from artificial flavors and furniture polish is made from real lemons. ~Alfred E. Newman  
Flowers
(3 photos)
Fishing / Hunting
(12 photos)
Cupcakes!
(21 photos)
Reply
~~We are living in a world today where lemonade is made from artificial flavors and furniture polish is made from real lemons. ~Alfred E. Newman  
Flowers
(3 photos)
Fishing / Hunting
(12 photos)
Cupcakes!
(21 photos)
Reply
post #598 of 762

"I see sprinkles. It's going to be a crumby day."

 

"Bakers just roll with it!"

 

"If at first you drop your cake ..make cake pops."

 

"Sift Happens!"

Reply

"I see sprinkles. It's going to be a crumby day."

 

"Bakers just roll with it!"

 

"If at first you drop your cake ..make cake pops."

 

"Sift Happens!"

Reply
post #599 of 762
Quote:
Originally Posted by milkmaid42 View Post
 

OK, I just finished a birthday cake for my little grand daughter who aspires to be a chef when she grows up. She wants to compete in a baking challenge--(she has a lot more nerve than I do!) She loves "helping" me in the kitchen, whether I need it or not. I encourage her efforts, although it is a lot easier without, as those of you with children know all too well. She loves my calling her my little chef so that definitely came to mind when thinking of her cake this year.

 

There are a lot of flaws I see in this effort. The table legs are wonky and I'm not at all pleased with the chef's hat, (can't remember the proper name---something that begins with a "T".) The BC border is uneven as the BC hadn't warmed up yet from the 'fridge. I seldom use BC anymore since my hands aren't as steady as they used to be. With a cold bag it was nigh impossible. That's why I am more comfortable with gum paste and fondant.

 

Anyway, here they are and I await your comments. 

 

I tried to use the URL located under the photos rather than posting them here on this post. But it was refused saying that I needed to use the photo's URL--that it appeared I used the page's URL. If someone could help me, I'd appreciate it for the future. I have been successful in the past so don't know what I did differently this AppleMark

 

 time.  Thanks,   Jan

 

AppleMark

Milkmaid- your inspiration for this cake makes me smile. My 4 year old daughter loves to help me bake too and I know she would adore your cake. I know you're asking for some helpful criticism here but I don't have a whole lot to give. For me, this cake feels like a scene in a rustic bakery in a beautiful, quaint European village~ a glimpse back to days gone by :) You say the table legs are wonky, but I think that adds to the charm of the cake! They are not so wonky that they look slobby, it looks more intentional. I think the chef's hat is also adorable. I wish I could see a bit better from your picture but the chef's face also looks beautifully detailed and realistic. I love to make fondant figurines and have not mastered the realistic look...yet :) It's funny how we can be critical of ourselves and others simply see a lovely cake. IF I could really say anything constructive, it would be that MAYBE you could have varried the color of the cake itself so that it didn't blend as much with the chef. Or perhaps photographing it against a black background may have given a bit more color contrast. But that's it because really, this cake is so sweet and makes me long for some good European bread! Well done :)

post #600 of 762

Hi, here is my latest cake - done just for fun as I wanted to do something :-)

 

http://cakecentral.com/g/i/3171236/a/3443655/roses-and-ruffles-chocolate-cake-filled-with-chocolate-orange-buttercream-and-decorated-with-sugarpaste-roses-and-vertical-ruffles/

 

I didn't have any gumpaste to hand so used fondant for the roses, which means that the petals were awfully fragile.  I need to practise more with proper gumpaste and see what the difference is.  I really enjoyed doing the vertical ruffles, though :-)

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cake Decorating
Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cake Decorating › Peer Review Cake Club!