Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cake Decorating Business › Bakery Job Interview
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Bakery Job Interview

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

Ok, so I went for a working job interview at a local bakery in town. I was given one of their recipes and told to mix and bake the product. I was then given a cake to frost and decorate as I wanted with buttercream. I passed with flying colors, so at the end of hearing how will the cupcakes and cake look after baking, and how wonderful my decorated cake looks I get I will start you at $7.25 an hour. I couldn't believe it. I made more,(8.50) then that at Food Lion and there I don't even have to bake, just plop on the board and decorate. Here I thought going to a regular bakery would be more decorating freedom and more money. So is this average money for a private owned bakery? Cause if so I guess I need to get a not so fun job and save the cake decorating for a hobby.

post #2 of 19

I have heard that it is pretty tough working in a bakery.  So sorry that you are having to deal with people like this.  I only do it for fun and as a hobby.  When I decide to cook cakes I normally do it for the neighborhood kids. They love it when they get cakes.  That way I am not under any stress and can enjoy baking and decorating.  Good luck with the bakery job!! Hopefully, it will get better for you!!

post #3 of 19

I get minimum wage at the bakery I work at and know that's what others start at in my area.  A very physical job at times lugging buckets 30-40 lbs and heavy trays, not to mention dishes and clean up.  That is the reality of most bakeries... profit line is not high in our area and I'm sure many other places.   For me it lets me decorate cookies the way I love and since I live in apt with cats will never bake out of house.   

  I think you would need to build up reputation and clients before you would get more money.

...plus side is produce I get and our boss is very generous about letting us eat what we want there.  Of course this way I can tell customers  what stuff tastes like.  maybe cake shops do better  Can someone tell me how their profit margin works vs  bread/pastry bakery.

Of course chocolate is the answer!
Reply
Of course chocolate is the answer!
Reply
post #4 of 19
Typically you would find out relevant information about the job (such as compensation) before the interview, otherwise what's the point of interviewing, especially a working interview?

Unfortunately in some areas there are bakers (licensed or not) that set prices below market value, which depresses the entire market. As a result, minimum wage may be all this bakery can afford and still make a profit if customers are being stolen by undercutting competitors. Grocery stores can usually pay more since their bakeries are often subsidized by other departments.
post #5 of 19

I always say this industry has a very poor sweat to dollar ratio and truly, I steer people away from it as a Plan A in life.  I wish someone would have told me :) (a million years ago)

post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 

Well, in 2008 I resigned from working as manager of a flower shop, that I have been working for for 18 years. I was getting burnt out on the floral industry trade as I have been in the industry for over 30 years. As I started working in a florist right out of high school. I wanted to trade in my fresh flowers for sugar flowers. So I quit to start my new carreer knowing I would have to start at the bottom again. So I started at Food Lion, to get the speed I would need, and the basic experience. But not making it on the pay and hours they could give me I also went back to the flower shop part time as designer, not manager. Now, 4 years later still making about the same as when I started in 2008, not much. I am just surprised as to how low the pay scale is for decorators. As I said I could understand low pay from a grocery store, but surprised at the pay being lower at a privately owned bakery. I am worth more then that and if they want a 7.25 designer/decorator they will get that, roses and balloons. Unfornately you get what you pay for as everyone says on here, 19.99 cake from Food Lion where I get 8.50 an hour or a 49.99 cake from a private bakery and I get 7.25 an hour. Hmmmmm?

post #7 of 19
Welcome to the food business. You work when everyone else is having fun and at the end the end of your paycheck you still have bills left to pay.
post #8 of 19
Hmm can you say "starving artist" boys and girls ? My daughter interviewed at a high end famous bakers private business here in California. After a "normal" I am told, 4-6 month process they couldn't even offer her enough to even make is worthwhile to drive the 120 every day just to get to work. Artists rarely make what they are worth, sad but true:-(
post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft View Post
Unfortunately in some areas there are bakers (licensed or not) that set prices below market value, which depresses the entire market. As a result, minimum wage may be all this bakery can afford and still make a profit if customers are being stolen by undercutting competitors. Grocery stores can usually pay more since their bakeries are often subsidized by other departments.

That was my first thought. When people undercharge, they're shooting themselves in the foot because of the above, cheating themselves of fair remuneration and are undercutting someone else.

post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft View Post

Unfortunately in some areas there are bakers (licensed or not) that set prices below market value, which depresses the entire market. As a result, minimum wage may be all this bakery can afford and still make a profit if customers are being stolen by undercutting competitors. Grocery stores can usually pay more since their bakeries are often subsidized by other departments.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by howsweet View Post

That was my first thought. When people undercharge, they're shooting themselves in the foot because of the above, cheating themselves of fair remuneration and are undercutting someone else.

 

yes this is all true

 

and

 

when i go to Michael's i am amazed at the tools available for the clever and the clumsy do-it yourselfers

 

africkenmazing--we're just talking in another thread about a low priced pillow cake--

 

hey you can buy a dang pillow cake pan--it doesn't have to be a sculpture--it's a simple two layer cake!

 

so not only do peeps underprice, the industry has been slowly pulling the rug out from under us for sometime a few decades

 

mortally unfriendly to owners as the tool makers try to stay alive too

 

no good answers--

 

<insert musical notes> stayin' alive, stayin' alive ahh ahh ahh ahh staying ali-i-i-i-ive

the only way to see the rainbow is to look through the rain

 

Reply
the only way to see the rainbow is to look through the rain

 

Reply
post #11 of 19

Been there....done that.    Compensation is not normally discussed (here) at the first interview.   I worked at a bakery for years that paid low wages.    I considered it "paid training"......learned what I could and got the hell out.  

Debbie - US Army (Retired) --aka "The Cake Sarge"

Good Cake Ain't Cheap! Cheap Cake Ain't Good!
Reply
Debbie - US Army (Retired) --aka "The Cake Sarge"

Good Cake Ain't Cheap! Cheap Cake Ain't Good!
Reply
post #12 of 19

like ddaigle said, bakery jobs are good for experience and training, but certainly not for money!

I know our local bakeries pay minimum wage, ($9.19), here, and have a very high employee turnover. Unfortunately, it's all they can afford though, like Jason said, they have a lot of undercutting competition.

One of our places went out of business about 2 months after Safeway opened up down the street, people just got their bread and nasty cheap cupcakes there instead.

A specialty bakery will almost always be a better job, that's what I did when I first started, in a shop that only sold custom cakes.

post #13 of 19

undercutting competition is bad, real bad

 

these are the users not the pushers

 

the pushers, the enablers are all the companies that make all our stuff available to everybody

 

i can buy cake deco stuff--really cool sh*t at my local grocery store

 

at my l.o.c.a.l g.r.o.c.e.r.y s.t.o.r.e

 

i can't necessarily equip myself for a tier cake there but you should see the awesome products they have--on occassion

 

like for holidays for example

 

they had these cookie pans--that made awesome detailed valentine cookies amongst many other things

 

the enablers and the enabled are gaining momentum for sure

the only way to see the rainbow is to look through the rain

 

Reply
the only way to see the rainbow is to look through the rain

 

Reply
post #14 of 19

In my rural neck of the woods, back in 1996 I worked at a grocery store bakery as the full time 2nd decorator.  The 1st decorator made $14 an hour to my $8 per hour and she had a very nice full benefit package and supported a disabled husband and two kids on that money.

 

Same town, flash forward to today, 2013 and a cake decorator makes $8 an hour, usually starting at $7.50 no matter her/his skill set or experience.  Part time, no benefits or a benefit offering that is 110% of your weekly take home pay, making it impossible to accept.

 

No wonder I retired.
 

Always put your eggs in one basket.......why do you want to carry two?
Reply
Always put your eggs in one basket.......why do you want to carry two?
Reply
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baker_Rose View Post

In my rural neck of the woods, back in 1996 I worked at a grocery store bakery as the full time 2nd decorator.  The 1st decorator made $14 an hour to my $8 per hour and she had a very nice full benefit package and supported a disabled husband and two kids on that money.

 

Same town, flash forward to today, 2013 and a cake decorator makes $8 an hour, usually starting at $7.50 no matter her/his skill set or experience.  Part time, no benefits or a benefit offering that is 110% of your weekly take home pay, making it impossible to accept.

 

No wonder I retired.
 

 



It's amazing how much the retail landscape has changed.  I'm one of the last FT bakers/decorators in my chain.  If I leave, retire (which is many years away, btw), or something-or-other, my position itself will no longer exist.  I'll be replaced by two or three PT people on minimum wage who will have minimal training because it's cheaper.  It's all about the bottom line for any publicly traded company.

 

We recently had a PT clerk quit after roughly 6 months.  She was scheduled 6 days/week for no more than 4 hours a shift, and what she made didn't even cover the gas for her 50-mile round trip to/from the store.  The position was the only one she could find in our area. She finally decided it wasn't worth the hassle, and I can't blame her one single bit.

 

I worked for an independent bakery for a spell many years ago.  I was paid less per hour than what I'd been last making at another supermarket chain, but I was paid more per hour than probably most of the other employees (discovered that by accident), many of whom had already had been there for years.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cake Decorating Business
Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cake Decorating Business › Bakery Job Interview